heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding; heeds

Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to pay attention

transitive verb

: to give consideration or attention to : mind heed what he says heed the call

heed

noun
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \

Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

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Examples of heed in a Sentence

Verb

It may be possible to desensitize a cat to being petted for extended periods.  … A safer solution is to consistently limit petting time, and to heed the cat's cues that she's had enough. Cat Watch, August 2008 In-line skating is not for everyone, and even those for whom it is ideally suited can skate into trouble, especially if they fail to heed safety precautions. — Jane E. Brody, New York Times, 2 May 1991 However, he should heed an axiom from the pretelevision age: physician, heal thyself. — George F. Will, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1986 She failed to heed the warnings. if we had heeded the ranger's advice, we might not have gotten lost

Noun

Neither the British ministry nor the British Parliament welcomed American voices in determining policy in 1763, or ever. The British government paid little heed to the public press on either side of the water. — Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books, 16 Nov. 2006 She retrained as a doctor and it was through her pioneering research with cancer patients in the early 1960s (she showed how narcotics could be used without adverse effect) that the medical profession began to take heed. — Kate Kellaway, Prospect, January 2003 Imagine swimming along with playful seals and then diving down to see such rarities as batfish.  … Fleets of hammerhead sharks pay divers no heed, nor do the penguins move out of the way. Town & Country, January 1983 took heed of the student's learning disability so as to arrive at reasonable expectations for him pay heed to what you're doing with that knife while you're talking
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But in two ways, business folk should heed his message, particularly those who care about the long term. The Economist, "Popenomics," 7 Sep. 2019 Trump’s call for American businesses to leave China is being heeded — not because of his tweets, but because of his tariffs. Nicholas Phillips, National Review, "The Trade War Is Smart Geopolitics," 5 Sep. 2019 Other drivers heeded advice to take alternate routes and crowded onto Interstate 680 and Highway 24. Michael Cabanatuan, SFChronicle.com, "I-80 reopens after chicken truck crash shut down westbound lanes in San Pablo," 5 Sep. 2019 And by all accounts, Hayes heeded Warinner's message. Orion Sang, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan football's Ryan Hayes starts to emerge at offensive tackle," 4 Sep. 2019 Whether Harris has heeded that advice is uncertain. Rainer Sabin | Rsabin@al.com, al, "How a Tide true freshman became a starting LB in 90 days," 26 Aug. 2019 Semeta heeded city staff’s recommendation to hold off on creating an ad hoc committee because a citywide broadband master plan is already under development. Priscella Vega, Daily Pilot, "H.B. council delays official decision on Ellis Avenue condo development as residents push to nix project," 20 Aug. 2019 Victor, a Chinese American college basketball player, heeds his father’s request to travel to Beijing and avenge his murder. Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times, "L.A. book events this week: Meet authors with deep roots to California’s past and present," 26 July 2019 Golfers have heeded that urging, in unknown numbers, round by round, every day of golf season, since Arcadia Bluffs opened in Manistee County 20 years ago. Keith Matheny, Freep.com, "Plastics pollution? Course urged golfers to hit balls into Lake Michigan," 22 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Even those with good job security should take heed as everyone can feel an income pinch during a recession, as companies might eliminate bonuses, reduce overtime or slow pay increases, Anastasio noted. Washington Post, "Worried about a recession? Protect yourself but don’t panic," 16 Aug. 2019 The Dolphins are surely challenged to take heed given the undertaking that lies ahead this year. Jarrett Bell, USA TODAY, "U.S. women's national soccer team coach Jill Ellis shares wisdom with Miami Dolphins," 4 Aug. 2019 Even though Tropical Depression Barry did not unleash catastrophic flooding in Louisiana, many across the Gulf Coast were urged to take heed of tornado and flash-flood warnings Monday as the storm moved north. Jonathan Drew, BostonGlobe.com, "Weakened Barry still poses flood, tornado risks," 15 July 2019 Even Claude Morgan, a fixture on the S.A. music scene since 1964 and the leader of the influential country act the Buckboard Boogie Boys, took heed. Hector Saldana, ExpressNews.com, "How the B-52s impacted San Antonio’s music scene in the ’80s," 14 Aug. 2019 These were labeled as Moka’s presents, but Nola took no heed of distinctions. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Rescued from captivity, Moka the tiger celebrates his first year at Alpine animal sanctuary," 27 July 2019 So yeah, those are things Hannah better pay heed to. Jessica Radloff, Glamour, "Chris Harrison Thinks Bachelorette Hannah Brown Should ‘Beware’ of Jed," 23 July 2019 Iran’s Revolutionary Guards said on Saturday that the ship entered the strait from the wrong direction, wasn’t paying heed to maritime regulations and could potentially have collided with other vessels. Alex Morales, Time, "U.K. Seeks to Ease Tensions in Persian Gulf After Iran Seizes Oil Tanker," 21 July 2019 Spaghetti Warehouse loyalists take heed: Pak is not ruling out opening the original brand in Houston. Greg Morago, Houston Chronicle, "Warehouse 72, Spaghetti Warehouse’s upscale sibling, to open Aug. 1 in Houston," 9 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heed

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood

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Statistics for heed

Last Updated

15 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for heed

The first known use of heed was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for heed

heed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to (advice, a warning, etc.)

heed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention or notice

heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding

Kids Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to : mind Heed my warning.

heed

noun

Kids Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention sense 1 The wild dogs had been to the house … and he had paid no heed to them.— Scott O'Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins

Other Words from heed

heedful adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on heed

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with heed

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heed

Spanish Central: Translation of heed

Nglish: Translation of heed for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of heed for Arabic Speakers

Comments on heed

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