heed

verb
\ˈhēd \
heeded; heeding; heeds

Definition of heed 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to pay attention

transitive verb

: to give consideration or attention to : mind heed what he says heed the call

heed

noun
\ˈhēd \

Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of heed in a Sentence

Verb

It may be possible to desensitize a cat to being petted for extended periods.  … A safer solution is to consistently limit petting time, and to heed the cat's cues that she's had enough. Cat Watch, August 2008 In-line skating is not for everyone, and even those for whom it is ideally suited can skate into trouble, especially if they fail to heed safety precautions. — Jane E. Brody, New York Times, 2 May 1991 However, he should heed an axiom from the pretelevision age: physician, heal thyself. — George F. Will, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1986 She failed to heed the warnings. if we had heeded the ranger's advice, we might not have gotten lost

Noun

Neither the British ministry nor the British Parliament welcomed American voices in determining policy in 1763, or ever. The British government paid little heed to the public press on either side of the water. — Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books, 16 Nov. 2006 She retrained as a doctor and it was through her pioneering research with cancer patients in the early 1960s (she showed how narcotics could be used without adverse effect) that the medical profession began to take heed. — Kate Kellaway, Prospect, January 2003 Imagine swimming along with playful seals and then diving down to see such rarities as batfish.  … Fleets of hammerhead sharks pay divers no heed, nor do the penguins move out of the way. Town & Country, January 1983 took heed of the student's learning disability so as to arrive at reasonable expectations for him pay heed to what you're doing with that knife while you're talking
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

So the next time a friend or loved one is going through something similar, heed the words of Babe Laufenberg on how to console them. Mac Engel, star-telegram, "Cowboys' radio voice opens up about son's fight against cancer," 18 June 2018 The pair were coordinated with Charles's hot pink boutonnière offsetting Camilla's pale pink ensemble, and among the few heeding royal tradition in their outfit choices. Tamara Abraham, Harper's BAZAAR, "Prince Charles and Camilla Coordinate in Pink for the Royal Wedding," 19 May 2018 Feinstein reminded Pruitt about that investigation, and questioned if his EPA is heeding the lessons learned from it. Evan Halper, latimes.com, "Will Trump's pick to run EPA in California show up for work?," 18 May 2018 The Republican House leadership didn't seem to be heeding the Republican governor, however. Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati.com, "Covington schools off again after Kentucky lawmakers pass budget," 2 Apr. 2018 Christensen heard his constituents and quickly heeded their requests. Hannah Smothers, Cosmopolitan, "State Rep. Confirms He's Introducing a Bill to Ban Arie From Minnesota," 6 Mar. 2018 Our ‘Zero Tolerance’ approach to enforcement sends a clear message to those who still don’t heed the warning to designate a sober driver before celebrations begin. Stephanie Petit, PEOPLE.com, "Vince Vaughn Arrested for DUI, Resisting Arrest in California," 10 June 2018 The boards are nailed in place to keep the strangers out — in case gawkers don’t heed the No Trespass signs affixed to the front of the home and to the trunks of greening trees surrounding it. Chris Graves, Cincinnati.com, "Pike County: Death in the foothills," 15 May 2018 To a question from the judge, Martins suggested that defense lawyers who don’t heed his prosecutor’s notice might be charged with violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act, conviction of with carries a maximum 10-year prison sentence. Carol Rosenberg, miamiherald, "9/11 attorneys say they can’t defend clients without questioning CIA about torture," 19 Jan. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Judging by the stout defence that Mexico displayed as the game progressed, Osorio's players took heed of his message. SI.com, "Mexico Boss Juan Carlos Osorio is Building Back the Trust of El Tri's Fans," 19 June 2018 Boskin, an advisor in George H.W. Bush’s administration, is certainly no regulatory zealot, so Silicon Valley should take heed of his prediction. Aaron Pressman, Fortune, "Data Sheet—Why Big Tech Will Dominate Policy Debates for Decades," 30 Apr. 2018 But the hurry to embrace industry means little heed was paid to the economics and now firms fall by the wayside. Time, "The Trouble with Sharing: China's Bike Fever Has Reached Saturation Point," 2 Apr. 2018 Much of official Washington had paid little heed when the provision with the law was passed, expecting the list to be shelved and forgotten as soon as it was released, as such reports often are. Gardiner Harris, New York Times, "Coming U.S. List of Oligarchs Linked to Putin Alarms Russia’s Rich," 26 Jan. 2018 And Houstonians in oil and gas and those who care about our long-term economic prosperity must take heed: The big paydays most certainly won’t last forever. Houston Chronicle, "Competition for top talent keeps pay scale high in oil industry," 13 July 2018 Developers seem to be paying little heed to the lessons of the last building boom. Dominique Fong, WSJ, "China’s Ghost Towns Haunt Its Economy," 15 June 2018 As for the identity of the killer, Pearce pays little heed to the progress of the murder mystery. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Charlize Theron Explores Motherhood’s Discontents in “Tully”," 4 May 2018 And China may pay no heed to American sanctions on Iran, which would further stoke tension between the two. The Economist, "The American president is stirring up trouble in a volatile oil market," 4 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of heed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heed

Verb

Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood

Noun

see heed entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about heed

Phrases Related to heed

pay heed to

take heed of

Statistics for heed

Last Updated

13 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for heed

The first known use of heed was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for heed

heed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to (advice, a warning, etc.)

heed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention or notice

heed

verb
\ˈhēd \
heeded; heeding

Kids Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to : mind Heed my warning.

heed

noun

Kids Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention sense 1 The wild dogs had been to the house … and he had paid no heed to them.— Scott O'Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins

Other Words from heed

heedful adjective

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on heed

What made you want to look up heed? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a generally accepted meaning of a word

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Great Scrabble Words—A Quiz

  • scrabble-tiles-that-read-scrabble-quiz
  • Which of the following Q-without-U words means the number five in cards or dice?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!