heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding; heeds

Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to pay attention

transitive verb

: to give consideration or attention to : mind heed what he says heed the call

heed

noun
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \

Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

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Examples of heed in a Sentence

Verb It may be possible to desensitize a cat to being petted for extended periods.  … A safer solution is to consistently limit petting time, and to heed the cat's cues that she's had enough. Cat Watch, August 2008 In-line skating is not for everyone, and even those for whom it is ideally suited can skate into trouble, especially if they fail to heed safety precautions. — Jane E. Brody, New York Times, 2 May 1991 However, he should heed an axiom from the pretelevision age: physician, heal thyself. — George F. Will, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1986 She failed to heed the warnings. if we had heeded the ranger's advice, we might not have gotten lost Noun Neither the British ministry nor the British Parliament welcomed American voices in determining policy in 1763, or ever. The British government paid little heed to the public press on either side of the water. — Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books, 16 Nov. 2006 She retrained as a doctor and it was through her pioneering research with cancer patients in the early 1960s (she showed how narcotics could be used without adverse effect) that the medical profession began to take heed. — Kate Kellaway, Prospect, January 2003 Imagine swimming along with playful seals and then diving down to see such rarities as batfish.  … Fleets of hammerhead sharks pay divers no heed, nor do the penguins move out of the way. Town & Country, January 1983 took heed of the student's learning disability so as to arrive at reasonable expectations for him pay heed to what you're doing with that knife while you're talking
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb This is the type of storm where people should heed evacuations. Dave Epstein, BostonGlobe.com, "Hurricane Dorian: What the latest forecast says," 30 Aug. 2019 One big wild card is the Federal Reserve, which could help restore confidence among investors by heeding Trump's call for more easy money. Matt Egan, CNN, "Remember December? Markets could face another 'bearish black hole'," 7 Aug. 2019 Instead of heeding the warning, Moose’s obsession only grows stronger, springing him into a much darker and possibly dangerous series of actions — all for that movie star’s signature. Alexia Fernandez, PEOPLE.com, "John Travolta Is a Crazed Stalker Out for Retribution in His New Film The Fanatic," 25 July 2019 Public health officials are warning people to heed their heat warnings. Errol Barnett, CBS News, "Heat wave across central U.S. prompts health warnings," 17 July 2019 There simply is no mainstream bloc among politicians of any party that seems interested in heeding that majority opinion. Adam Weinstein, The New Republic, "Most Veterans Say America’s Wars Are a Waste. No One’s Listening to Them.," 12 July 2019 Should Calipari heed the calls for more 3-point shooting, this lineup could be particularly potent on the offensive end. Jon Hale, The Courier-Journal, "Calipari has no shortage of options for picking Kentucky's starting lineup next season," 2 July 2019 People from in and around the Closs family’s hometown of Barron and as far away as the Minneapolis area, about 80 miles (130 kilometers) to the southwest, heeded the call for volunteer help. Jeff Baenen, The Seattle Times, "Authorities assess items found in search for missing girl," 23 Oct. 2018 As Facebook catches heck over a cavalier approach to user data, many people are heeding the call to #DeleteFacebook. David Lazarus, latimes.com, "California Inc.: Hollywood is courted by a newly moviegoing Saudi Arabia," 2 Apr. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Ham & Eggers take heed: SDSU has banned motorized scooters, skateboards, bikes, et al. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Decisions over Fernando Tatis Jr., Andy Green, farm system facing Padres," 24 Aug. 2019 But the galactically curious should take heed: Space travel will probably remain prohibitively expensive for anyone outside the 1% for a long, long time. Jackie Wattles, CNN, "Is the future of space travel just for super rich people?," 25 July 2019 Scan the area and try to locate the snake, then take heed and back away. Mary Forgione, latimes.com, "It’s rattlesnake season: 12 things you need to know," 7 June 2019 The homes, some built without heed to code, lack ties to the electricity grid and sewage systems. Simon Romero, New York Times, "Hawaii’s Volcano Country, Where Land Is Cheap and the Living Is Risky," 25 May 2018 So pay heed to Moses’ and Kitch’s use of the word over the course of the play. Barbara Ellis, The Know, "Review: Curious Theatre’s “Pass Over” puts violence against young black men at center stage," 14 Sep. 2019 The protestors, who came together in an unusual show of religious solidarity, chanted slogans against Zomato and said the food-delivery company was not paying heed to their demands. Manavi Kapur, Quartz India, "Zomato says it’s impossible to factor in veg and non-veg preferences into delivery logistics," 11 Aug. 2019 Even those with good job security should take heed as everyone can feel an income pinch during a recession, as companies might eliminate bonuses, reduce overtime or slow pay increases, Anastasio noted. Washington Post, "Worried about a recession? Protect yourself but don’t panic," 16 Aug. 2019 The Dolphins are surely challenged to take heed given the undertaking that lies ahead this year. Jarrett Bell, USA TODAY, "U.S. women's national soccer team coach Jill Ellis shares wisdom with Miami Dolphins," 4 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heed

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood

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Time Traveler for heed

Time Traveler

The first known use of heed was before the 12th century

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Statistics for heed

Last Updated

27 Oct 2019

Cite this Entry

“Heed.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heeded. Accessed 21 November 2019.

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More Definitions for heed

heed

verb
How to pronounce heed (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to (advice, a warning, etc.)

heed

noun
How to pronounce heed (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention or notice

heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding

Kids Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to : mind Heed my warning.

heed

noun

Kids Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention sense 1 The wild dogs had been to the house … and he had paid no heed to them.— Scott O'Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins

Other Words from heed

heedful adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on heed

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heed

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with heed

Spanish Central: Translation of heed

Nglish: Translation of heed for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of heed for Arabic Speakers

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