hate

noun, often attributive
\ ˈhāt \

Definition of hate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : intense hostility and aversion usually deriving from fear, anger, or sense of injury
b : extreme dislike or disgust : antipathy, loathing had a great hate of hard work
c : a systematic and especially politically exploited expression of hatred a crime motivated by bigotry and hate often used before another noun hate mailan organization tracking hate groups — see also hate crime
2 : an object of hatred a generation whose finest hate had been big business— F. L. Paxson

hate

verb
hated; hating

Definition of hate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to feel extreme enmity toward : to regard with active hostility hates his country's enemies
2 : to have a strong aversion to : find very distasteful hated to have to meet strangers hate hypocrisy

intransitive verb

: to express or feel extreme enmity or active hostility harsh faces and hating eyes— Katherine A. Porter
hate one's guts
: to hate someone with great intensity

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Other Words from hate

Verb

hater noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for hate

Synonyms: Noun

abhorrence, abomination, detestation, execration, hatred, loathing

Synonyms: Verb

abhor, abominate, despise, detest, execrate, loathe

Antonyms: Noun

affection, devotion, fondness, love

Antonyms: Verb

love

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Choose the Right Synonym for hate

Verb

hate, detest, abhor, abominate, loathe mean to feel strong aversion or intense dislike for. hate implies an emotional aversion often coupled with enmity or malice. hated the enemy with a passion detest suggests violent antipathy. detests cowards abhor implies a deep often shuddering repugnance. a crime abhorred by all abominate suggests strong detestation and often moral condemnation. abominates all forms of violence loathe implies utter disgust and intolerance. loathed the mere sight of them

Examples of hate in a Sentence

Noun

These crimes are motivated by prejudice and hate. They have been unable to overcome their hates and fears.

Verb

He was a cruel tyrant who was hated and feared by his people. She hated them for betraying her. They were political rivals who truly hated each other. What is it that you hate about him most? children whose families have taught them to hate They hate being apart from each other. I hate the idea of leaving my mother alone all week.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The hashtag #bellpottingermustfall became popular on Twitter, and Bell Pottinger employees received a stream of hate mail. Ed Caesar, The New Yorker, "The Reputation-Laundering Firm That Ruined Its Own Reputation," 25 May 2018 The national media spotlight also has helped bolster Oregon's reputation as a historic hotbed of hate. Aimee Green, OregonLive.com, "Defense: Black teen allegedly killed by white man had violent history, too," 4 May 2018 Prosecutors say Fields was the driver of the vehicle and was photographed hours before the attack with a shield bearing the emblem of one of the hate groups taking part in the rally. Robert Strickley, Cincinnati.com, "NKY native James Alex Fields pleads not guilty in Charlottesville attack," 5 July 2018 But environmentalists have a love-hate relationship with Shark Week. Radhika Viswanathan, Vox, "Overfishing is decimating sharks. This map shows where they cross paths with fishing boats.," 26 July 2018 Places where our own love-hate relationship with wild animals flings open the door for the unexpected. Aditi Shrikant, BostonGlobe.com, "When wild animals urbanize," 13 July 2018 With noticeable results, many CPAP users, even those like Blumstein with a love-hate relationship with their devices, persist. Washington Post, "New ways to conquer sleep apnea compete for place in bedroom," 12 July 2018 The love-hate relationship travelers have toward flying is inescapable. Pat Lenhoff, chicagotribune.com, "Column: The magic and horror of air travel," 12 July 2018 As his and Ruth’s love-hate flirtation simmers, Sam briefly shacks up with the beautiful, flighty wrestler Rhonda Richardson (Kate Nash). Judy Berman, New York Times, "What to Remember Before ‘GLOW’ Comes Back for Season 2," 25 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

People are going to either love or hate the collection. Rachel Epstein, Marie Claire, "Nikita Gill Is Reimagining Fairytales as Empowering Messages for Adult Women," 10 Sep. 2018 Love them, hate them or envy them, the Warriors’ supreme skill this year was being irritating. Ben Golliver, SI.com, "Warriors' Greatness May Annoy Some but They Aren't Going Anywhere," 9 June 2018 Depending on the region, they either love or hate us. Fox News, "Odd-man out? President Trump talks trade, tariffs at the G7 summit," 9 June 2018 Why the show-runners decided to make these two young girls hate each other in season two is a mystery. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "'Stranger Things' Season 3: Everything We Know So Far," 10 Dec. 2018 Most people have developed a love/hate relationship with various platforms yet still check them obsessively. Adam Schubak, Good Housekeeping, "5 Things to Do Before 2018 Ends That Will Help You Kick Off 2019," 30 Nov. 2018 There's a lot to love and hate about dry shampoo, simultaneously. Allure Editors, Allure, "The Best New Beauty Products This Month," 9 July 2018 Hyperbolic denunciations of particular enemies in scripture become a universal license to hate and condemn others. Jonathan L. Walton, Time, "Why Authoritarians Love to Quote This Bible Passage," 22 June 2018 That complaint is more than fair—like or hate the messages about the role of elites in society that bubble up in his scripts, Bird is undoubtedly an artist who seeks to challenge viewers. David Sims, The Atlantic, "Incredibles 2 Is an Exhilarating Ride," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hate

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for hate

Noun

Middle English, probably derivative of haten "to hate entry 2," replacing hete "hate, hatred," going back to Old English, going back to Germanic *hatiz- (whence, also inflected as an i-stem as in Old English, Old Saxon heti "hatred," and, inflected as a neuter strong noun, Old Norse hatr "hatred, spite" and Gothic hatis "anger, enmity"), perhaps going back to Indo-European *ḱh2d-es-, derivative of a base *ḱeh2d- "grief, pain, hatred," whence, with different ablaut grades and suffixation, Oscan cadeis (genitive singular) "ill will," Middle Irish cais "love, hatred," Old Welsh cás "bitterness, hatred" (Celtic from a derivative *ḱh2d-ti-), Greek kêdos (neuter) "care, grief, (in plural) funeral rites, mourning, connection by marriage," Avestan sādra- "grief, pain, calamity"

Note: Though this Indo-European etymon is generally accepted in etymological dictionaries of the relevant older languages, the semantic relations are far from transparent, in particular the relation between "grief, mourning, care" (Greek, Iranian) and "hatred" (Germanic, Italic, and Celtic, though the ambiguity of the Irish word is peculiar).

Verb

Middle English haten, going back to Old English hatian, going back to Germanic *hatōjan- (whence Old Saxon haton "to hate," Old High German hazzōn, Old Norse hata,), derivative from the base of *hatiz- hate entry 1

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Statistics for hate

Last Updated

25 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hate

The first known use of hate was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for hate

hate

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a very strong feeling of dislike

hate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of hate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to dislike (someone) very strongly : to feel hate for (someone)

: to dislike (something) very strongly : to find (something) very unpleasant

hate

noun
\ ˈhāt \

Kids Definition of hate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: deep and bitter dislike

hate

verb
hated; hating

Kids Definition of hate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to feel great dislike toward
hate someone's guts
: to hate someone very much

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More from Merriam-Webster on hate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with hate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hate

Spanish Central: Translation of hate

Nglish: Translation of hate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on hate

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