loathe

verb
\ ˈlōt͟h How to pronounce loathe (audio) \
loathed; loathing

Definition of loathe

transitive verb

: to dislike greatly and often with disgust or intolerance : detest

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Other Words from loathe

loather noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for loathe

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Choose the Right Synonym for loathe

hate, detest, abhor, abominate, loathe mean to feel strong aversion or intense dislike for. hate implies an emotional aversion often coupled with enmity or malice. hated the enemy with a passion detest suggests violent antipathy. detests cowards abhor implies a deep often shuddering repugnance. a crime abhorred by all abominate suggests strong detestation and often moral condemnation. abominates all forms of violence loathe implies utter disgust and intolerance. loathed the mere sight of them

Loath vs. Loathe

Many usage commentators point out that the spelling of loath the adjective is distinct from loathe, the verb that means "to dislike greatly." Merriam-Webster dictionaries record loathe (along with loth) as a variant spelling for the adjective, at the same time indicating that the spelling with an e is not as common as the form without it. Both words hark back to Old English, and the e ending in each has come and gone over the centuries - but if you want to avoid the ire of those who like to keep the language tidy, stick with loath for the adjective and loathe for the verb.

Examples of loathe in a Sentence

In fact, he was an energetic walker his whole life, but he loathed fresh-air fiends and he was rather stuck on the idea of being dissolute. — Paul Theroux, New York Times Book Review, 21 Apr. 1991 How I loathed the look of that type on my pages! Everything I wrote seemed, in that type, arrhythmic, dull, stupid. — Joseph Epstein, The Middle of My Tether, 1983 I loathed the job so much that I did it quickly, urgently, almost violently. — W. P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe, 1982 Pushing the table from him while he spoke, as though he loathed the sight of food, he encountered the watch: the hands of which were almost upon noon. — Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby, 1839 They were rivals who truly loathed each other. I loathe having to do this. It was a habit his wife loathed.
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Recent Examples on the Web Yang is precisely the kind of New Yorker—happy-go-lucky, tech-savvy, and intermittent—whom Fran Lebowitz would loathe. Michael Schulman, The New Yorker, "Andrew Yang, Fran Lebowitz, and Who Gets to Be a “Real” New Yorker," 21 Jan. 2021 Marinelli was loathe to use a high draft pick on the position. David Moore, Dallas News, "5 issues facing the Cowboys’ defense this offseason, including key free agent decisions," 19 Jan. 2021 The film is considered a masterpiece, but the at-home audiences loathe it. Joe Reid, Vulture, "What Happens in the Mirror Universe Where Darren Aronofsky Made Batman Instead of Christopher Nolan?," 12 Jan. 2021 Like Brexit or loathe it, that is how democracy is supposed to work. Walter Russell Mead, WSJ, "Brexit Arrives, for Better or Worse," 4 Jan. 2021 This was also the case in the US, and many veterans, who had depended on the product while deployed, came to loathe it in peacetime. James Griffiths, CNN, "Derided in the West, spam is so beloved in Asia that one company has invented a meat-free version of it," 26 Dec. 2020 This is part of the reason Democrats loathe the electoral college these days and Republicans love it. NBC News, "Meet the Press - December 20, 2020," 20 Dec. 2020 Most of us are loathe to remove any of the color from our landscapes by cutting flowers. Dan Gill, NOLA.com, "Resolutions for gardeners: Dan Gill's 14 suggestions on making 2021 a verdant year," 30 Dec. 2020 Seattle safety Jamal Adams said the level of accountability within the unit has increased to the point where players are loathe to be the guy that make a mistake and let the team down. oregonlive, "Seattle Seahawks’ defense proving its upward trend is legitimate after dominating the New York Jets," 14 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'loathe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of loathe

12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for loathe

Middle English lothen, from Old English lāthian to dislike, be hateful, from lāth

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Time Traveler for loathe

Time Traveler

The first known use of loathe was in the 12th century

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Statistics for loathe

Last Updated

15 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Loathe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/loathe. Accessed 27 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for loathe

loathe

verb

English Language Learners Definition of loathe

: to hate (someone or something) very much

loathe

verb
\ ˈlōt͟h How to pronounce loathe (audio) \
loathed; loathing

Kids Definition of loathe

: to dislike greatly

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Comments on loathe

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