loathe

verb
\ ˈlōt͟h \
loathed; loathing

Definition of loathe

transitive verb

: to dislike greatly and often with disgust or intolerance : detest

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Other Words from loathe

loather noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for loathe

Synonyms

abhor, abominate, despise, detest, execrate, hate

Antonyms

love

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Choose the Right Synonym for loathe

hate, detest, abhor, abominate, loathe mean to feel strong aversion or intense dislike for. hate implies an emotional aversion often coupled with enmity or malice. hated the enemy with a passion detest suggests violent antipathy. detests cowards abhor implies a deep often shuddering repugnance. a crime abhorred by all abominate suggests strong detestation and often moral condemnation. abominates all forms of violence loathe implies utter disgust and intolerance. loathed the mere sight of them

Loath vs. Loathe

Many usage commentators point out that the spelling of loath the adjective is distinct from loathe, the verb that means "to dislike greatly." Merriam-Webster dictionaries record loathe (along with loth) as a variant spelling for the adjective, at the same time indicating that the spelling with an e is not as common as the form without it. Both words hark back to Old English, and the e ending in each has come and gone over the centuries - but if you want to avoid the ire of those who like to keep the language tidy, stick with loath for the adjective and loathe for the verb.

Examples of loathe in a Sentence

In fact, he was an energetic walker his whole life, but he loathed fresh-air fiends and he was rather stuck on the idea of being dissolute. — Paul Theroux, New York Times Book Review, 21 Apr. 1991 How I loathed the look of that type on my pages! Everything I wrote seemed, in that type, arrhythmic, dull, stupid. — Joseph Epstein, The Middle of My Tether, 1983 I loathed the job so much that I did it quickly, urgently, almost violently. — W. P. Kinsella, Shoeless Joe, 1982 Pushing the table from him while he spoke, as though he loathed the sight of food, he encountered the watch: the hands of which were almost upon noon. — Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby, 1839 They were rivals who truly loathed each other. I loathe having to do this. It was a habit his wife loathed.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The New York Times’s loved-and-loathed needle was simply out of commission during the early, uncertain period of the evening. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "4 winners and 2 losers from the 2018 midterm elections," 7 Nov. 2018 This, of course, drives cattle-loathing environmentalists nuts. Candice Rainey, Condé Nast Traveler, "The Colorado Ranch Retreat That Gives You a Real Taste of Cowboy Life," 20 July 2018 The nickname is universally loathed by physicists, including Peter Higgs himself, from whom the boson gets its name. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Nobel-prize winning physicist who coined “god particle” dead at 96," 3 Oct. 2018 Trump is widely loathed by the Palestinians following his decision last December to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Mohammed Daraghmeh, Fox News, "Palestinian-American candidate is source of West Bank pride," 8 Aug. 2018 All else being equal, a 62-year-old white, Christian Democrats who lives in rural Montana will loathe Republicans less than a 23-year-old Hispanic, agnostic Democrat who lives in Los Angeles. Ezra Klein, Vox, "The political tribalism of Andrew Sullivan," 11 Dec. 2018 People loathe the media, even more than politicians. Fox News, "FOX NEWS FIRST: Bruce Ohr kept Mueller deputy 'in the loop' about dossier, sources say," 31 Aug. 2018 Kavanaugh was a top aide to President George W. Bush, whom Trump loathes. Philip Elliott, Time, "Inside Donald Trump's Supreme Court Deliberations," 9 July 2018 If Jones sounds like the epitome of a player who’s loved as a teammate and loathed as an opponent, there’s a reason. Curtis Zupke, latimes.com, "Prospects for Kings, Ducks built tight bond on junior hockey squad," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'loathe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of loathe

12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for loathe

Middle English lothen, from Old English lāthian to dislike, be hateful, from lāth

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Learn More about loathe

Dictionary Entries near loathe

Loasaceae

loasa family

loath

loathe

loathful

loathing

loathingly

Statistics for loathe

Last Updated

16 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for loathe

The first known use of loathe was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for loathe

loathe

verb

English Language Learners Definition of loathe

: to hate (someone or something) very much

loathe

verb
\ ˈlōt͟h \
loathed; loathing

Kids Definition of loathe

: to dislike greatly

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More from Merriam-Webster on loathe

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with loathe

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for loathe

Spanish Central: Translation of loathe

Nglish: Translation of loathe for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of loathe for Arabic Speakers

Comments on loathe

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