fragment

noun
frag·​ment | \ ˈfrag-mənt How to pronounce fragment (audio) \

Definition of fragment

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a part broken off, detached, or incomplete The dish lay in fragments on the floor.

fragment

verb
frag·​ment | \ ˈfrag-ˌment How to pronounce fragment (audio) \
fragmented; fragmenting; fragments

Definition of fragment (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall to pieces

transitive verb

: to break up or apart into fragments

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Synonyms for fragment

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for fragment

Noun

part, portion, piece, member, division, section, segment, fragment mean something less than the whole. part is a general term appropriate when indefiniteness is required. they ran only part of the way portion implies an assigned or allotted part. cut the pie into six portions piece applies to a separate or detached part of a whole. a puzzle with 500 pieces member suggests one of the functional units composing a body. a structural member division applies to a large or diversified part. the manufacturing division of the company section applies to a relatively small or uniform part. the entertainment section of the newspaper segment applies to a part separated or marked out by or as if by natural lines of cleavage. the retired segment of the population fragment applies to a part produced by or as if by breaking off. only a fragment of the play still exists

Examples of fragment in a Sentence

Noun The dish lay in fragments on the floor. I could only hear fragments of their conversation. Verb The party is fragmenting into warring factions. These issues are fragmenting our society. The property is being fragmented into subdivisions.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun To boost the efficiency further, the researchers simplified things a bit by directly connecting the blue enzyme to the green fragment. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "A mildly insane idea for disabling the coronavirus," 28 Nov. 2020 This fragment was still quite large, measuring 3,900 miles across. Ashley Strickland, CNN, "Hubble watches massive storm on Neptune reverse course," 17 Dec. 2020 The fragment of energy is a lot like stars in a distant galaxy. Tim Childers, Popular Mechanics, "New Theory Casually Upends Space and Time," 10 Dec. 2020 Some researchers have tried to make flu vaccines that only contain HA’s stalk, but this fragment is highly unstable. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "An innovative universal flu vaccine shows promises in it first clinical test," 7 Dec. 2020 Jens Naumann was 17 when an accident sent a fragment of metal from a railway line flying into his left eye. Simon Makin, Scientific American, "Bionic Eye Tech Learns Its ABCs," 4 Dec. 2020 One fragment in particular showed the remnants of four lines of text, consisting of about 15 letters. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "College undergrads find hidden text on medieval manuscript via UV imaging," 20 Nov. 2020 For six years, the surreal fragment was on view there to generate excitement and raise funds for the pedestal to hold the colossal statue coming to New York from France. New York Times, "Reimagining Lady Liberty’s Torch to Meet This Moment," 23 Oct. 2020 From there, the fragment is used to train the immune system to detect and destroy the virus. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Here’s everything you need to know about Pfizer’s positive vaccine news," 9 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The change will fragment liquidity and add cost and complexity for all manner of operations that in recent decades have settled in London. Rochelle Toplensky, WSJ, "Who Wins From Brexit? New York," 17 Dec. 2020 The implementation of the 1994 Northwest Forest Plan did improve habitat on federal lands in the Northwest, Lesmeister said, but forest conditions on private and state lands have continued to fragment. Zach Urness, USA TODAY, "Spotted owls pushed closer to 'extinction vortex' by Oregon wildfires," 2 Dec. 2020 Instead of mass rallies and totalitarian cults, society will fragment into mutually incomprehensible bubbles, and only celebrity will possess the transcendental power necessary to deliver electoral numbers. Rana Dasgupta, Harper's Magazine, "The Silenced Majority," 24 Nov. 2020 One way to meet the imminent end of Freedom-of-Choice here is the way Little Rock did—to fragment the city into zones that may breed hostility and instability. Arkansas Online, "OPINION | EDITORIAL: Schools’ path to integration," 18 Oct. 2020 Finally, the protest made its way over to a strip-mall parking lot near a Kwik Trip — Wisconsin’s gas station of choice — and, after a few more cheers and chants, began to fragment as people wandered home. Luther Ray Abel, National Review, "On the Ground at Trump’s Wisconsin Rally," 19 Aug. 2020 This reframing overcomes the shortfalls of the two-state solution, as these activists see them, which are to enshrine divisions among Palestinians and fragment the Palestinian people. Tareq Baconi, The New York Review of Books, "Israel’s Annexation Plan, a New Era in Palestinian Resistance," 2 July 2020 But the controversy is only the latest salvo in an ongoing battle over how to balance human and wildlife needs in India’s increasingly fragmented 177 million acres of forests, most of which lie inside Adivasi areas. Paul Salopek, National Geographic, "Millions of indigenous people face eviction from their forest homes," 15 May 2019 For a time, Hangouts actually achieved this Google messaging utopia, but Google eventually lost interest in maintaining the app and kept fragmenting the user base by launching new messaging apps. Ron Amadeo, Ars Technica, "Google unifies messenger teams, plans “more coherent vision”," 8 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fragment.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fragment

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1818, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for fragment

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Latin fragmentum, from frag-, variant stem of frangere "to break, shatter" + -mentum -ment — more at break entry 1

Verb

derivative of fragment entry 1

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Time Traveler for fragment

Time Traveler

The first known use of fragment was in the 15th century

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Statistics for fragment

Last Updated

9 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Fragment.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fragment. Accessed 18 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for fragment

fragment

noun
How to pronounce fragment (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of fragment

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a broken part or piece of something
: an incomplete part

fragment

verb
How to pronounce fragment (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of fragment (Entry 2 of 2)

: to break or to cause (something) to break into parts or pieces

fragment

noun
frag·​ment | \ ˈfrag-mənt How to pronounce fragment (audio) \

Kids Definition of fragment

: a broken or incomplete part a fragment of rock a fragment of music

fragment

noun
frag·​ment | \ ˈfrag-mənt How to pronounce fragment (audio) \

Medical Definition of fragment

: a part broken off or detached

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Comments on fragment

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