foster

adjective
fos·ter | \ˈfȯ-stər, ˈfä-\

Definition of foster 

(Entry 1 of 4)

: affording, receiving, or sharing nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties They are foster parents to three foster children.

foster

verb
fostered; fostering\ˈfȯ-st(ə-)riŋ, ˈfä- \

Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to give parental care to : nurture They are considering fostering a child.

2 : to promote the growth or development of : encourage fostered the college in its early years policies that foster competition

Foster

biographical name (1)
Fos·ter | \ˈfȯ-stər, ˈfä-\

Definition of Foster (Entry 3 of 4)

Stephen Collins 1826–1864 American songwriter

Foster

biographical name (2)

Definition of Foster (Entry 4 of 4)

William Z(ebulon) 1881–1961 American Communist

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Other Words from foster

Verb

fosterer \ˈfȯ-stər-ər, ˈfä- \ noun

Examples of foster in a Sentence

Verb

Such conditions foster the spread of the disease. Would you consider fostering a child?

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Juana is set to head to New York City to be with her husband and 15-year-old daughter, who recently was released from foster care, according to group organizer Julie Schwietert-Collazo. Lara Korte, WSJ, "New York Volunteers Win Release for Two More Migrants Separated From Children," 10 July 2018 Trinity House helps fill a void for those 16 to 21 who are aging out of foster care, housing up to 10 young men at a time. Maureen C. Gilmer, Indianapolis Star, "Trinity House will be home to young men aging out of foster care," 6 July 2018 When no such option is available, the child should at least be placed in a home environment with a licensed foster parent trained in childcare and trauma. Darlene Byrne, Time, "I'm a Judge Who Decides if Children Should Be Separated from Abusive Parents. Here’s How Trump’s Immigration Policy Should Change," 27 June 2018 Children whose parents are arrested by immigration officials are transferred to the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services, which attempts to place them with other relatives or foster parents. Eli Rosenberg, Washington Post, "Sessions defends separating immigrant parents and children: ‘We’ve got to get this message out’," 5 June 2018 The protections outlined in the bill do not apply to the two agencies contracting directly with DCF to provide foster care services. Fox News, "LGBT advocates express opposition to Kansas adoption bill," 26 Apr. 2018 Layla gained a couple of pounds in the shelter and was placed with a foster parent for about five weeks, where she was trained and gained more weight. Lurissa Carbajal, azcentral, "'She was literally at death's door': A mastiff gets a second chance at life," 21 Apr. 2018 Luggage of Hope is a new Heart Gallery of Broward County initiative aimed to smooth the transition for foster children. Krislyn Placide, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Heart Gallery of Broward County collects luggage for foster children," 12 July 2018 Aaliyah is legally free for adoption, and once a placement is identified her foster mother is willing to stay involved in Aaliyah’s life. BostonGlobe.com, "Aaliyah, 3, loves dancing to music," 7 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

He was fostered for a few months before eventually being taken in by Don and Cheryl Tveidt, who lived near Anchorage. Michael Katz, idahostatesman, "His mother left him in a box. 31 years later, this Boisean has reunited with his father.," 12 July 2018 With Syrian patients, in Israel In the meantime, in the northern Israeli coastal town of Nahariya, the process of fostering new attitudes among Syrians continues. Dina Kraft, The Christian Science Monitor, "Syrian civil war, on Israel's doorstep, brings swirl of changing attitudes," 11 July 2018 From early on, fandom has thus fostered collecting. Nancy Baym, WIRED, "Book Excerpt: How Music Fans Built the Internet," 10 July 2018 So spending your money with organizations that meet your values is a key way of immediately fostering diversity at your company. Tom Alexander, chicagotribune.com, "Five things you can do to improve diversity and inclusion at your company today, like right now, this moment," 5 July 2018 Grace fostered lifetime friendships working at Mrs. Murphy's Donuts for several years. courant.com, "Grace A. Kulik," 5 July 2018 Camp Grier/Bren Photography Camp Grier fosters in kids from second through 12th grades a love for outdoor labor – and celebrating the fruits of it. Page Leggett, charlotteobserver, "'We leave technology behind' at Camp Grier, and enjoy nature instead," 5 July 2018 Violent crime stunts economic development, fosters helplessness, contributes to community level trauma, strains our criminal justice system, and of course, homicides have a devastating impact on families and communities. kansascity, "Jean Paul Bradshaw," 30 June 2018 According to a recent Religion News Service article, feeling a sense of awe takes us out of ourselves and fosters positive social relationships, lowers stress and cultivates overall well-being. Jody Schmal And Mizanur Rahman, Houston Chronicle, "10 awe-inspiring Texas sites to help beat the dog days of summer," 29 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'foster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of foster

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for foster

Adjective

Middle English, from Old English fōstor-, from fōstor food, feeding; akin to Old English fōda food

Verb

see foster entry 1

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Learn More about foster

Dictionary Entries near foster

fossor

fossorial

fossulate

foster

Foster

fosterage

foster care

Phrases Related to foster

foster care

foster parent

Statistics for foster

Last Updated

11 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for foster

The first known use of foster was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for foster

foster

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

—used to describe a situation in which for a period of time a child lives with and is cared for by people who are not the child's parents

foster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to help (something) grow or develop

: to provide the care that a parent usually gives to a child : to be or become the foster parent of a child

foster

adjective
fos·ter | \ˈfȯ-stər \

Kids Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: giving, receiving, or offering parental care even though not related by blood or legal ties a foster parent a foster child a foster home

foster

verb
fostered; fostering

Kids Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give parental care to

2 : to help the growth and development of We're trying to foster a sense of responsibility.

foster

adjective
fos·ter

Legal Definition of foster 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: affording, receiving, or sharing nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal relationships a foster child a foster parent

fostered; fostering

Legal Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give parental care to

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