foster

adjective
fos·​ter | \ ˈfȯ-stər How to pronounce foster (audio) , ˈfä- \

Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: affording, receiving, or sharing nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal ties They are foster parents to three foster children.

foster

verb
fostered; fostering\ ˈfȯ-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce foster (audio) , ˈfä-​ \

Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 4)

transitive verb

1 : to give parental care to : nurture They are considering fostering a child.
2 : to promote the growth or development of : encourage fostered the college in its early years policies that foster competition

Foster

biographical name (1)
Fos·​ter | \ ˈfȯ-stər How to pronounce Foster (audio) , ˈfä- \

Definition of Foster (Entry 3 of 4)

Stephen Collins 1826–1864 American songwriter

Foster

biographical name (2)

Definition of Foster (Entry 4 of 4)

William Z(ebulon) 1881–1961 American Communist

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Other Words from foster

Verb

fosterer \ ˈfȯ-​stər-​ər How to pronounce Foster (audio) , ˈfä-​ \ noun

Examples of foster in a Sentence

Verb Such conditions foster the spread of the disease. Would you consider fostering a child?
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Pearson’s life growing up in foster care, drug dealing, serving a prison sentence on second-degree murder charges, and overcoming time on the streets to become an actress. Althea Legaspi, Rolling Stone, 8 Sep. 2021 The state child protective agency received more than $25 million in federal funds to help current or former foster care youths during the COVID-19 pandemic. Peggy O’hare, San Antonio Express-News, 7 Sep. 2021 In Laëtitia, the director turns his camera on a crime that shook his home country in 2011: the murder of 18-year-old Laëtitia Parrais, who lived with her twin sister Jessica in foster care. Judy Berman, Time, 31 Aug. 2021 Per Indiana Administrative code, the rates for residential treatment and foster care agencies that are for-profit community businesses are also enhanced by a small profit margin. Philip Potempa, chicagotribune.com, 27 Aug. 2021 A decade ago, Navarro and his two older brothers were taken out of their parents’ custody and put in foster care. Jack Harris, Los Angeles Times, 24 Aug. 2021 Amin was taken away by Child Protective Services and put into foster care. NBC News, 23 Aug. 2021 For that separation to be replicated again seven months later when I was placed from foster care to adoption, another bond and attachment broken. Jenn Selby, refinery29.com, 23 Aug. 2021 The two boys survived and were placed in foster care, joining a White couple who eventually adopted the twins. Gary Robbins, San Diego Union-Tribune, 21 Aug. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In December, seven states and the District of Columbia threw their support behind his claim, writing that protecting the privacy of state residents will foster greater trust between citizens and state officials. Nicholas Rowan, Washington Examiner, 22 Feb. 2021 Daily Paper continues to foster a global community with their latest capsule collection titled From Africa To The World. Greg Emmanuel, Essence, 25 Aug. 2021 For the past 77 years, that sacred hour has been an interracial, interfaith, and intercultural experience meant to foster faithful community and find ways to affirm all people as children of God. Maisie Sparks, The Christian Science Monitor, 19 July 2021 The two nonprofits see it as an opportunity to foster community between their different demographics. Megan Taros, The Arizona Republic, 30 June 2021 Somnium Space initiated a Creators Fund to support and foster their creators’ community who want to build inside Somnium Metaverse. Cathy Hackl, Forbes, 28 June 2021 But the rule comes down to the university's efforts to put health and safety first, to support its academic mission and to foster a campus community where people think about the greater good. Devi Shastri, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 18 May 2021 Parks also help to foster the community by providing a retreat for residents and opportunities for volunteers to come together to care for them, Hill said. Julia Jacobo, ABC News, 22 Apr. 2021 The shop, which is located in New York’s Chinatown, also leads W.O.W Project, which was launched by owner Mei Lum to foster the neighborhood’s creative community. Dale Arden Chong, Glamour, 16 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'foster.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of foster

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for foster

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Old English fōstor-, from fōstor food, feeding; akin to Old English fōda food

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Time Traveler for foster

Time Traveler

The first known use of foster was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near foster

fossulate

foster

Foster

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Statistics for foster

Last Updated

15 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Foster.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/foster. Accessed 18 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for foster

foster

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

used to describe a situation in which for a period of time a child lives with and is cared for by people who are not the child's parents

foster

verb

English Language Learners Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to help (something) grow or develop
: to provide the care that a parent usually gives to a child : to be or become the foster parent of a child

foster

adjective
fos·​ter | \ ˈfȯ-stər How to pronounce foster (audio) \

Kids Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: giving, receiving, or offering parental care even though not related by blood or legal ties a foster parent a foster child a foster home

foster

verb
fostered; fostering

Kids Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give parental care to
2 : to help the growth and development of He fosters a sense of caring.

foster

adjective
fos·​ter

Legal Definition of foster

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: affording, receiving, or sharing nurture or parental care though not related by blood or legal relationships a foster child a foster parent

foster

transitive verb
fostered; fostering

Legal Definition of foster (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give parental care to

More from Merriam-Webster on foster

Nglish: Translation of foster for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of foster for Arabic Speakers

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