fact

noun
\ ˈfakt How to pronounce fact (audio) \

Definition of fact

1a : something that has actual existence space exploration is now a fact
b : an actual occurrence prove the fact of damage
2 : a piece of information presented as having objective reality These are the hard facts of the case.
3 : the quality of being actual : actuality a question of fact hinges on evidence
4 : a thing done: such as
a : crime accessory after the fact
b archaic : action
c obsolete : feat
5 archaic : performance, doing
in fact
: in truth He looks younger, but in fact, he is 60 years old.

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Synonyms & Antonyms for fact

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Examples of fact in a Sentence

Rapid electronic communication is now a fact. The book is filled with interesting facts and figures. He did it, and that's a fact.
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Recent Examples on the Web Much to our delight, this fact is lost on most stoplight challengers. Don Schroeder, Car and Driver, "Tested: 1993 Caterham Super 7 Blends the Lightweight Purity of the Lotus 7 With A Modern Drivetrain," 28 June 2020 This rarity highlights a most fortuitous fact: Earth orbits the sun at about 93 million miles, a favorable distance for a species that for its comfort depends on both air conditioning and down jackets. Anchorage Daily News, "Appreciating rain during Alaska’s all-too-brief summer," 27 June 2020 Right or wrong, the toppling of three bronze sculptures last week in Golden Gate Park underscored a blunt fact: The age of heroic statuary has reached a dead end. Taylor Kate Brown, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Briefing: Are we already in a second wave?," 26 June 2020 Ardern and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged the full financial support of their respective governments, a fact not lost on the Asian Football Confederation president. Washington Post, "Women’s World Cup heads to a welcome Down Under in 2023," 26 June 2020 What interests me more than this utterly prosaic fact is the question of why. Matthew Walther, TheWeek, "Falling statues and the collapse of moral authority," 26 June 2020 The largest review to date of more than 100 studies done worldwide has confirmed a cheering fact: Most children who contract COVID-19 will do just fine. Melissa Fletcher Stoeltje, ExpressNews.com, "A Texas review of more than 100 studies worldwide shows that children who get COVID-19 do just fine," 26 June 2020 Five black Republicans won primary races in the Baltimore area, a fact that one candidate believes has not received any media coverage. Andrew Mark Miller, Washington Examiner, "Pro-Trump congressional candidate: Media 'won't cover' five black GOP primary victories in Baltimore area," 26 June 2020 The Red Army also bore the brunt of defeating Nazi Germany, a fact that Mr. Putin’s article chided his Western readers for sometimes forgetting. Fred Weir, The Christian Science Monitor, "Why does World War II still hold such a grip on Russia?," 25 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fact.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fact

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4

History and Etymology for fact

borrowed from Latin factum "deed, action, real event," noun derivative from neuter of factus, past participle of facere "to make, bring about, perform, do," going back to a suffixed form *dhh1-k-i̯e- (with perfect fēcī from *dheh1-k-) of Indo-European *dhh1-, dheh1- "put, place, make, do" — more at do entry 1

Note: The extension *-k- has been compared with the Greek extended aorist éthēka "I placed" (corresponding to present títhēmi "I set, put, placed"), apparently parallel to Latin jaciō, jacere "to throw" and Greek hêka "I threw" (see jet entry 3); though the identity of the two formatives has been disputed.

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Time Traveler for fact

Time Traveler

The first known use of fact was in the 15th century

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Statistics for fact

Last Updated

1 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Fact.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fact. Accessed 10 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for fact

fact

noun
How to pronounce fact (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of fact

: something that truly exists or happens : something that has actual existence
: a true piece of information

fact

noun
\ ˈfakt How to pronounce fact (audio) \

Kids Definition of fact

1 : something that really exists or has occurred Space travel is now a fact.
2 : a true piece of information “I just know for a fact that she has a huge family to feed!”— Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
in fact
: in truth : actually She got there early and in fact she was earliest.

fact

noun

Legal Definition of fact

1 : something that has actual existence : a matter of objective reality
2 : any of the circumstances of a case that exist or are alleged to exist in reality : a thing whose actual occurrence or existence is to be determined by the evidence presented at trial — see also finding of fact at finding, judicial notice, question of fact at question, trier of fact — compare law, opinion
adjudicative fact
: a fact particularly related to the parties to an especially administrative proceeding — compare legislative fact in this entry
collateral fact
: a fact that has no direct relation to or immediate bearing on the case or matter in question — compare material fact in this entry
constitutional fact
: a fact that relates to the determination of a constitutional issue (as violation of a constitutional right) used especially of administrative findings of fact
evidentiary fact
: a fact that is part of the situation from which a case arises and that is established by testimony or other evidence

called also mediate fact, predicate fact

— compare ultimate fact in this entry
legislative fact
: a fact of general social, economic, or scientific relevance that does not change from case to case — compare adjudicative fact in this entry
material fact
: a fact that affects decision making: as
a : a fact upon which the outcome of all or part of a lawsuit depends
b : a fact that would influence a reasonable person under the circumstances in making an investment decision (as in purchasing a security or voting for a corporate officer or action)
mediate fact
: evidentiary fact in this entry
predicate fact
: evidentiary fact in this entry
ultimate fact \ ˈəl-​ti-​mət-​ \
: a conclusion of law or especially mixed fact and law that is necessary to the determination of issues in a case and that is established by evidentiary facts — compare evidentiary fact in this entry
in fact
: as a factual matter : established by fact rather than as a matter of law

History and Etymology for fact

Latin factum deed, real happening, something done, from neuter of factus, past participle of facere to do, make

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More from Merriam-Webster on fact

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fact

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fact

Spanish Central: Translation of fact

Nglish: Translation of fact for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fact for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fact

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