expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Definition of expel

transitive verb

1 : to force out : eject expelled the smoke from her lungs
2 : to force to leave (a place, an organization, etc.) by official action : take away rights or privileges of membership was expelled from college

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Other Words from expel

expellable \ ik-​ˈspe-​lə-​bəl How to pronounce expellable (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for expel

eject, expel, oust, evict mean to drive or force out. eject carries an especially strong implication of throwing or thrusting out from within as a physical action. ejected an obnoxious patron from the bar expel stresses a thrusting out or driving away especially permanently which need not be physical. a student expelled from college oust implies removal or dispossession by power of the law or by force or compulsion. police ousted the squatters evict chiefly applies to turning out of house and home. evicted for nonpayment of rent

Did You Know?

To expel is to drive out, and its usual noun is expulsion. Expel is similar to eject, but expel suggests pushing out while eject suggests throwing out. Also, ejecting may only be temporary: the player ejected from a game may be back tomorrow, but the student expelled from school is probably out forever.

Examples of expel in a Sentence

The club may expel members who do not follow the rules. She was expelled from school for bad behavior. expel air from the lungs
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Recent Examples on the Web Like, maybe your body's burning some extra calories in expelling those farts? Claire Gillespie, Health.com, "Let's Settle This: Does Farting Burn Calories?," 6 Nov. 2019 After expelling Islamic State militants from southeastern Syria in 2018, the Kurds seized control of the more profitable oil fields to the south in Deir el-Zour province. Washington Post, "Not over yet: New US Syria mission after al-Baghdadi’s death," 29 Oct. 2019 His chance came in 1516, when the emir of Algiers requested his help in expelling Spanish soldiers from the neighboring Peñón of Algiers, a small island fortress. National Geographic, "This 16th-century corsair was the most feared pirate of the Mediterranean," 8 Oct. 2019 Rivera said she was expelled from her home as a child and isn’t sure where she was born. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Trump closes doors to immigrants, some US citizens open them," 19 Sep. 2019 Asked about the potential for expelling Inman from his $71,685 job, House Minority Leader Christine Greig, a Democrat, pointed to an ongoing effort to recall him from office. David Eggert, chicagotribune.com, "Michigan House, by a 98-8 vote, wants Republican lawmaker facing charges in alleged vote-for-campaign-money scheme to resign," 29 Aug. 2019 The settlement likely won’t call for expelling KPMG from any audit activities, one of the people said. Dave Michaels, WSJ, "KPMG to Pay as Much as $50 Million to Settle SEC Probe," 13 June 2019 Delegates representing the nation's largest Protestant denomination will likely vote on establishing criteria for expelling churches that mishandle or cover up abuse allegations. Fox News, "Sex abuse crisis tops agenda as Southern Baptists convene," 9 June 2019 Protecting free speech on campus by expelling students for their political activism: just what the First Amendment’s drafters intended. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "Data shows a surprising campus free speech problem: left-wingers being fired for their opinions," 3 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expel

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for expel

Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere, from ex- + pellere to drive — more at felt

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Statistics for expel

Last Updated

14 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for expel

The first known use of expel was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for expel

expel

verb
How to pronounce expel (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of expel

: to officially force (someone) to leave a place or organization
: to push or force (something) out

expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Kids Definition of expel

1 : to force to leave He was expelled from school.
2 : to force out expel air from lungs

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More from Merriam-Webster on expel

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for expel

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with expel

Spanish Central: Translation of expel

Nglish: Translation of expel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of expel for Arabic Speakers

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