expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Definition of expel

transitive verb

1 : to force out : eject expelled the smoke from her lungs
2 : to force to leave (a place, an organization, etc.) by official action : take away rights or privileges of membership was expelled from college

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Other Words from expel

expellable \ ik-​ˈspe-​lə-​bəl How to pronounce expel (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for expel

eject, expel, oust, evict mean to drive or force out. eject carries an especially strong implication of throwing or thrusting out from within as a physical action. ejected an obnoxious patron from the bar expel stresses a thrusting out or driving away especially permanently which need not be physical. a student expelled from college oust implies removal or dispossession by power of the law or by force or compulsion. police ousted the squatters evict chiefly applies to turning out of house and home. evicted for nonpayment of rent

Did you know?

To expel is to drive out, and its usual noun is expulsion. Expel is similar to eject, but expel suggests pushing out while eject suggests throwing out. Also, ejecting may only be temporary: the player ejected from a game may be back tomorrow, but the student expelled from school is probably out forever.

Examples of expel in a Sentence

The club may expel members who do not follow the rules. She was expelled from school for bad behavior. expel air from the lungs
Recent Examples on the Web The order allows for the rapid expulsion of migrants at the southern border due to COVID-19 and has been used to expel a majority of migrants since March 2020. Adam Shaw, Fox News, 5 May 2022 They are carried out under Title 42 authority, which was named for a public health law and used to expel migrants on the grounds of preventing the spread of COVID-19. Elliot Spagat, The Arizona Republic, 5 May 2022 Last year, Turkey threatened to expel 10 foreign ambassadors, including the U.S. ambassador, after their embassies signed a letter calling for Kavala’s release, sparking a brief diplomatic crisis. Washington Post, 25 Apr. 2022 University of Colorado Boulder officials condemned the conduct and threatened to permanently expel any student found to have attacked police and other first responders during the mayhem. Bill Hutchinson, ABC News, 7 Mar. 2021 An appeals court on Thursday suspended a federal judge's order that would have barred the Biden administration from using a pandemic-era border policy to expel migrant families with little to no due process. Camilo Montoya-galvez, CBS News, 30 Sep. 2021 Biden also has tried to expel most families traveling together, but changes in Mexican law have forced agents to release many parents and children into the U.S. Elliot Spagat And Nomaan Merchant, Chron, 30 Mar. 2021 Biden also has tried to expel most families traveling together, but changes in Mexican law have forced agents to release many parents and children into the U.S. Elliot Spagat And Nomaan Merchant, chicagotribune.com, 30 Mar. 2021 The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, could not say why U.S. officials expel some families to Mexico while others are released into the United States. Rick Jervis, USA TODAY, 27 Mar. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expel

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for expel

Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere, from ex- + pellere to drive — more at felt

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Learn More About expel

Time Traveler for expel

Time Traveler

The first known use of expel was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near expel

expeditive

expel

expellant

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Statistics for expel

Last Updated

16 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Expel.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expel. Accessed 25 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for expel

expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Kids Definition of expel

1 : to force to leave He was expelled from school.
2 : to force out expel air from lungs

More from Merriam-Webster on expel

Nglish: Translation of expel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of expel for Arabic Speakers

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