expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Definition of expel

transitive verb

1 : to force out : eject expelled the smoke from her lungs
2 : to force to leave (a place, an organization, etc.) by official action : take away rights or privileges of membership was expelled from college

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Other Words from expel

expellable \ ik-​ˈspe-​lə-​bəl How to pronounce expellable (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for expel

eject, expel, oust, evict mean to drive or force out. eject carries an especially strong implication of throwing or thrusting out from within as a physical action. ejected an obnoxious patron from the bar expel stresses a thrusting out or driving away especially permanently which need not be physical. a student expelled from college oust implies removal or dispossession by power of the law or by force or compulsion. police ousted the squatters evict chiefly applies to turning out of house and home. evicted for nonpayment of rent

Did You Know?

To expel is to drive out, and its usual noun is expulsion. Expel is similar to eject, but expel suggests pushing out while eject suggests throwing out. Also, ejecting may only be temporary: the player ejected from a game may be back tomorrow, but the student expelled from school is probably out forever.

Examples of expel in a Sentence

The club may expel members who do not follow the rules. She was expelled from school for bad behavior. expel air from the lungs
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Recent Examples on the Web

To expel hot air, use operable windows, rooftop vents or exhaust fans. Joseph Truini, Popular Mechanics, "How to Build a Greenhouse," 28 Jan. 2019 Deputy Prime Minister Carmen Calvo said Friday that Spain activated a 1992 agreement with Rabat to expel the migrants. Fox News, "The Latest: Spain denies migrant expulsion is policy change," 24 Aug. 2018 The case led the United States and other countries to expel a large number of Russian diplomats. Gregory Katz, chicagotribune.com, "Bottle containing nerve agent found in home of poisoned man in U.K., police say," 13 July 2018 Amid the Trump administration’s push to expel immigrants with criminal records, Southeast Asians have started to be deported in record numbers. Laignee Barron, Time, "U.S. Imposes Visa Sanctions on Myanmar and Laos Over Their Refusal to Accept Deportees," 11 July 2018 The March 4 elections swept in a new populist government which is deeply skeptical of the European Union and has already slammed the door to new migrants while threatening to expel the ones already in the country. Jason Horowitz, BostonGlobe.com, "Migrants were welcome in Macerata, before a murder," 7 July 2018 The decision comes some two months after the Mallary Baptist Association - which is made up of more than 50 churches in Southwest Georgia - first decided to expel Raleigh White Baptist over their actions toward New Seasons Church. Breanna Edwards, The Root, "Georgia Church Expelled from the Southern Baptist Convention after Being Accused of Discriminating Against Black Congregation," 13 June 2018 However, active efforts to expel water from a drowning victim's airway by means of abdominal thrusts or placing the person head down could be harmful and should be avoided. Dwight Adams, Indianapolis Star, "Here's what you need to know to prevent drownings," 13 June 2018 The issue has roiled relations with Cuba, which immediately fell under suspicion, and led the United States to expel Cuban diplomats. Author: Steven Lee Myers, Jane Perlez, Anchorage Daily News, "Medical mystery grows as ailment afflicting U.S. envoys is now seen in China," 6 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expel

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for expel

Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere, from ex- + pellere to drive — more at felt

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Statistics for expel

Last Updated

7 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for expel

The first known use of expel was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for expel

expel

verb

English Language Learners Definition of expel

: to officially force (someone) to leave a place or organization
: to push or force (something) out

expel

verb
ex·​pel | \ ik-ˈspel How to pronounce expel (audio) \
expelled; expelling

Kids Definition of expel

1 : to force to leave He was expelled from school.
2 : to force out expel air from lungs

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More from Merriam-Webster on expel

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with expel

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for expel

Spanish Central: Translation of expel

Nglish: Translation of expel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of expel for Arabic Speakers

Comments on expel

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