oust

verb
\ˈau̇st \
ousted; ousting; ousts

Definition of oust 

transitive verb

1a : to remove from or dispossess of property or position by legal action, by force, or by the compulsion of necessity The rebels ousted the dictator from power.

b : to take away (something, such as a right or authority) : bar, remove The states do not like attempts by Congress to oust their jurisdiction.

2 : to take the place of : supplant must be careful that quantity does not oust quality— R. V. Williams

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Choose the Right Synonym for oust

eject, expel, oust, evict mean to drive or force out. eject carries an especially strong implication of throwing or thrusting out from within as a physical action. ejected an obnoxious patron from the bar expel stresses a thrusting out or driving away especially permanently which need not be physical. a student expelled from college oust implies removal or dispossession by power of the law or by force or compulsion. police ousted the squatters evict chiefly applies to turning out of house and home. evicted for nonpayment of rent

Examples of oust in a Sentence

The rebels ousted the dictator from power. Large national banks are ousting local banks in many communities.

Recent Examples on the Web

That surprise was part of a series of problems that have pushed GE shares to their lowest levels in years and prompted GE to decide to break itself apart and oust its chief executive. David Benoit, WSJ, "In GE Probe, Ex-Staffers Say Insurance Risks Were Ignored," 30 Nov. 2018 On Election Day, Democrats were most successful in ousting the remaining ones, many of whom sat in suburban, anti-Trump districts. Tara Golshan, Vox, "How a small, Trumpy group of House Republicans wants to keep a check on Democrats," 29 Nov. 2018 Stocks are up for marijuana companies, especially because Sessions’ ousting comes after three states voted to ease restrictions on the drug in this week’s midterm elections. Angela Chen, The Verge, "Marijuana advocates celebrate after Jeff Sessions is ousted," 8 Nov. 2018 She was quietly appointed last Friday as a temporary replacement for Kerry Perry, who took over in the wake of the Larry Nassar scandal that led to then-president Steve Penny’s ousting. Jessica Taylor Price, Teen Vogue, "USA Gymnastics Faces Calls to Decertify Following Mary Bono Hiring and Resigning," 19 Oct. 2018 The ungainly compromise that resulted, released this week, has enraged both sides of the debate, sparking ministerial resignations and giving new wing to the effort to oust Mrs. May from power. Max Colchester, WSJ, "Simple but Undefined Brexit Question Leads to Reckoning for U.K.’s May," 16 Nov. 2018 But in Kentucky, one of the top Democratic recruits, retired Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath, lost her bid to oust to three-term Rep. Andy Barr. Jill Colvin, The Seattle Times, "Added Democratic ranks pose threat to Trump governing agenda," 7 Nov. 2018 The Democratic candidate, Josh Harder, is trying to oust a GOP incumbent in a campaign that turned into something of a referendum on Silicon Valley. Theodore Schleifer, Recode, "Josh Harder is in a dead heat in his congressional race to become the only venture capitalist in the House of Representatives," 7 Nov. 2018 The standoff was the latest in a series of clashes between government forces and protesters who want to oust Ortega and return to democracy in Nicaragua. Washington Post, BostonGlobe.com, "Two killed as pro-government militia traps protesters in Nicaraguan church," 14 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'oust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of oust

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for oust

Middle English, from Anglo-French oster, ouster to take off, remove, oust, from Late Latin obstare to ward off, from Latin, to stand in the way, from ob- in the way + stare to stand — more at ob-, stand

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Statistics for oust

Last Updated

6 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for oust

The first known use of oust was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for oust

oust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of oust

: to cause or force (someone or something) to leave a position of power, a competition, etc.

: to take the place of (someone or something)

oust

verb
\ˈau̇st \
ousted; ousting

Kids Definition of oust

: to force or drive out (as from office or from possession of something)

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More from Merriam-Webster on oust

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with oust

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for oust

Spanish Central: Translation of oust

Nglish: Translation of oust for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of oust for Arabic Speakers

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