expatriate

verb
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \
expatriated; expatriating

Definition of expatriate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

2 : to withdraw (oneself) from residence in or allegiance to one's native country

intransitive verb

: to leave one's native country to live elsewhere also : to renounce allegiance to one's native country

expatriate

adjective
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ət How to pronounce expatriate (audio) , -trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \

Definition of expatriate (Entry 2 of 3)

: living in a foreign land

expatriate

noun
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ət How to pronounce expatriate (audio) , -trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \

Definition of expatriate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a person who lives in a foreign country Hemingway himself in The Sun Also Rises, 1926, had given the picture of the dislocated life of young English and American expatriates in the bars of Paris, the "lost generation," as Gertrude Stein defined them.— Robert Penn Warren

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Synonyms for expatriate

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of expatriate in a Sentence

Verb members of the deposed dictator's once-feared political party were expatriated as well
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Gifts must be made long enough in advance that there is no appearance of a plan to gift and then expatriate, but a recent law might have made this more appealing. Jo Craven Mcginty, WSJ, "More Americans Are Renouncing Their Citizenship," 16 Oct. 2020 Qatar is renewing efforts to make real estate more attractive to expatriate residents, foreign investors and real estate funds. Simone Foxman, Bloomberg.com, "Qatar Eases Rules on Foreign Property Ownership Amid Slump," 6 Oct. 2020 The protection of students’ ability to express themselves freely should extend to expatriate communities. H. R. Mcmaster, National Review, "How to Counter the Chinese Communist Party," 22 Sep. 2020 Turkey has already expatriated some 7,600 suspected fighters over the past several years, officials in Ankara say. The Economist, "Turkey deports Islamic State fighters," 28 Nov. 2019 Both sectors were intensive and extensive, monoculture producers of cash commodities for export, with the profits expatriated to outside owners. Wade Graham, Smithsonian, "Why Molokai, With All Its Wonders, Is the Least Developed of Hawai’i’s Islands," 31 Aug. 2019 In the 2000s, anti-Chinese sentiment resulted in riots in the Solomon Islands, PNG and Tonga, where a fatal unrest prompted Beijing to send a charter plane to expatriate around 200 Chinese nationals. Julia Hollingsworth, CNN, "Why China is challenging Australia for influence over the Pacific Islands," 22 July 2019 When Mary Richards was a child, Van Lew expatriated her to Liberia, reflecting a disturbing belief shared by pro-slavery and anti-slavery whites that free blacks had no place in this country. Lois Leveen, Time, "She Was Born Into Slavery, Was a Spy and Is Celebrated as a Hero—But We're Missing the Point of the 'Mary Bowser' Story," 19 June 2019 Plus, several Manhattan chefs have expatriated to the town, so, yum. Devin Alessio, ELLE Decor, "Take A Weekend Getaway In Hudson, New York," 16 Sep. 2016 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Starting Tuesday, Japan will begin easing entry restrictions for newly arriving expatriate workers and other long-term residents from Taiwan, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. Allison Prang And David Hall, WSJ, "New U.S. Coronavirus Cases Fall Below 25,000," 8 Sep. 2020 In addition to sheer numbers, Groves had to contend with scores of expatriate German scientists and with some American scientists who had shown sympathy to the Soviet Union. Dennis Eskow, Popular Mechanics, "How They Hid the Bomb: 75 Years After the Trinity Nuclear Test," 16 July 2020 The company, founded in 1980, became one of the largest remittance operators in the Middle East by mainly catering to Indian expatriate workers in the Gulf. Dinesh Nair, Bloomberg.com, "NMC Lenders Tally Losses as ADCB Taps Lazard to Recover Funds," 5 May 2020 He was scheduled to return to the West African country on Dec. 23 after months in Europe building support for his political movement among expatriate Ivorians, but changed his plans after the issue of an arrest warrant. Leanne De Bassompierre, Bloomberg.com, "Ivory Coast Urged to Uphold Legal Rights of Political Opponents," 8 May 2020 From tax codes to residency restrictions to health care systems, each country offers a slightly different introduction to expatriate life. Lana Bortolot, New York Times, "Thinking of Moving Abroad? Here Are Five Things to Know Before You Go," 21 Feb. 2020 Hong Kong is home to a large expatriate population, including 25,000 Japanese citizens. Washington Post, "China hosts Japan, S. Korea ministers in bid to smooth row," 22 Aug. 2019 On the job, expatriate employees of Aramco in Saudi Arabia discover that industry leadership means technical excellence with a commitment to innovation. Houston Chronicle, "Aramco expatriates discover their full potential," 15 Feb. 2020 Paris is home to a large expatriate population, many of them Americans. Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY, "Iowa's caucusgoers have a new place to vote: overseas," 1 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Hong Kong, with its British colonial history and large expatriate population, has usually seen raucous celebrations along the waterfront and in bar districts. Time, "2020 Is Finally Ending, but New Year's Revelries Are Muted by the Coronavirus," 31 Dec. 2020 Nearly a sixth of Oman’s expatriate workers left the Gulf Arab country in the first 11 months of 2020, after losing their jobs because of the coronavirus pandemic, the Times of Oman reported, citing government figures. Zainab Fattah, Bloomberg.com, "Oman’s Expat Work Force Down by 16% Amid Pandemic, Report Says," 28 Dec. 2020 Too many works by Emilio Sanchez (1921-99), an expatriate to the United States from a wealthy, aristocratic Cuban family, who merged architectural subjects with geometric abstraction. Los Angeles Times, "Commentary: How can a museum think it owns too much work by important artists? Ask this one," 14 Dec. 2020 At the same time, Saudis and expatriate residents canceled overseas vacation plans due to the coronavirus pandemic, boosting electricity demand at home. Verity Ratcliffe, Bloomberg.com, "Saudi Arabia’s Gas Push Pays Off as Production Hits Record," 3 Nov. 2020 The publication of the paper by lead author Li-Meng Yan -- an expatriate from China seeking asylum in the US -- was quickly linked to former White House adviser Steve Bannon, long a strident critic of China's government. Eliza Mackintosh, CNN, "What you need to know about coronavirus on Thursday, October 22," 22 Oct. 2020 Hundreds of thousands of expatriate workers lost their jobs. Washington Post, "Arab stories of a plague year," 20 Nov. 2020 Founded by Sylvia Beach in 1919, Shakespeare & Company became a creative hub for expatriate writers including Ernest Hemingway, T.S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and James Joyce. Thomas Adamson, Star Tribune, "Virus-hit Paris bookshop Shakespeare & Co appeals for help," 6 Nov. 2020 So that's giving nervous voters a little extra time to daydream about becoming an expatriate. Jayme Deerwester, USA TODAY, "Thinking about moving to Canada after the election? COVID-19 could affect your plans," 5 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expatriate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expatriate

Verb

1768, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Adjective

1812, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1818, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for expatriate

Verb

Medieval Latin expatriatus, past participle of expatriare to leave one's own country, from Latin ex- + patria native country, from feminine of patrius of a father, from patr-, pater father — more at father

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Time Traveler for expatriate

Time Traveler

The first known use of expatriate was in 1768

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Cite this Entry

“Expatriate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expatriate. Accessed 25 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for expatriate

expatriate

noun
How to pronounce expatriate (audio) How to pronounce expatriate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of expatriate

: a person who lives in a foreign country

expatriate

verb
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \
expatriated; expatriating

Legal Definition of expatriate

transitive verb

: to voluntarily withdraw (oneself) from allegiance to one's native country

intransitive verb

: to renounce allegiance to one's country and abandon one's nationality voluntarily

Other Words from expatriate

expatriate \ -​trē-​ət \ noun
expatriation \ ek-​ˌspā-​trē-​ˈā-​shən How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \ noun

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Comments on expatriate

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