expatriate

verb
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \
expatriated; expatriating

Definition of expatriate

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

2 : to withdraw (oneself) from residence in or allegiance to one's native country

intransitive verb

: to leave one's native country to live elsewhere also : to renounce allegiance to one's native country

expatriate

adjective
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ət How to pronounce expatriate (audio) , -trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \

Definition of expatriate (Entry 2 of 3)

: living in a foreign land

expatriate

noun
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ət How to pronounce expatriate (audio) , -trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \

Definition of expatriate (Entry 3 of 3)

: a person who lives in a foreign country Hemingway himself in The Sun Also Rises, 1926, had given the picture of the dislocated life of young English and American expatriates in the bars of Paris, the "lost generation," as Gertrude Stein defined them.— Robert Penn Warren

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Synonyms for expatriate

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of expatriate in a Sentence

Verb members of the deposed dictator's once-feared political party were expatriated as well
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Qatar is renewing efforts to make real estate more attractive to expatriate residents, foreign investors and real estate funds. Simone Foxman, Bloomberg.com, "Qatar Eases Rules on Foreign Property Ownership Amid Slump," 6 Oct. 2020 The protection of students’ ability to express themselves freely should extend to expatriate communities. H. R. Mcmaster, National Review, "How to Counter the Chinese Communist Party," 22 Sep. 2020 Turkey has already expatriated some 7,600 suspected fighters over the past several years, officials in Ankara say. The Economist, "Turkey deports Islamic State fighters," 28 Nov. 2019 Both sectors were intensive and extensive, monoculture producers of cash commodities for export, with the profits expatriated to outside owners. Wade Graham, Smithsonian, "Why Molokai, With All Its Wonders, Is the Least Developed of Hawai’i’s Islands," 31 Aug. 2019 In the 2000s, anti-Chinese sentiment resulted in riots in the Solomon Islands, PNG and Tonga, where a fatal unrest prompted Beijing to send a charter plane to expatriate around 200 Chinese nationals. Julia Hollingsworth, CNN, "Why China is challenging Australia for influence over the Pacific Islands," 22 July 2019 When Mary Richards was a child, Van Lew expatriated her to Liberia, reflecting a disturbing belief shared by pro-slavery and anti-slavery whites that free blacks had no place in this country. Lois Leveen, Time, "She Was Born Into Slavery, Was a Spy and Is Celebrated as a Hero—But We're Missing the Point of the 'Mary Bowser' Story," 19 June 2019 Plus, several Manhattan chefs have expatriated to the town, so, yum. Devin Alessio, ELLE Decor, "Take A Weekend Getaway In Hudson, New York," 16 Sep. 2016 The obstacles include the precedent that the Constitution does not allow the government to expatriate Americans against their will, through a landmark 1967 case, Afroyim v. Rusk. Charlie Savage, New York Times, "Trump Calls for Revoking Flag Burners’ Citizenship. Court Rulings Forbid It.," 29 Nov. 2016 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Starting Tuesday, Japan will begin easing entry restrictions for newly arriving expatriate workers and other long-term residents from Taiwan, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. Allison Prang And David Hall, WSJ, "New U.S. Coronavirus Cases Fall Below 25,000," 8 Sep. 2020 In addition to sheer numbers, Groves had to contend with scores of expatriate German scientists and with some American scientists who had shown sympathy to the Soviet Union. Dennis Eskow, Popular Mechanics, "How They Hid the Bomb: 75 Years After the Trinity Nuclear Test," 16 July 2020 The company, founded in 1980, became one of the largest remittance operators in the Middle East by mainly catering to Indian expatriate workers in the Gulf. Dinesh Nair, Bloomberg.com, "NMC Lenders Tally Losses as ADCB Taps Lazard to Recover Funds," 5 May 2020 He was scheduled to return to the West African country on Dec. 23 after months in Europe building support for his political movement among expatriate Ivorians, but changed his plans after the issue of an arrest warrant. Leanne De Bassompierre, Bloomberg.com, "Ivory Coast Urged to Uphold Legal Rights of Political Opponents," 8 May 2020 From tax codes to residency restrictions to health care systems, each country offers a slightly different introduction to expatriate life. Lana Bortolot, New York Times, "Thinking of Moving Abroad? Here Are Five Things to Know Before You Go," 21 Feb. 2020 Hong Kong is home to a large expatriate population, including 25,000 Japanese citizens. Washington Post, "China hosts Japan, S. Korea ministers in bid to smooth row," 22 Aug. 2019 On the job, expatriate employees of Aramco in Saudi Arabia discover that industry leadership means technical excellence with a commitment to innovation. Houston Chronicle, "Aramco expatriates discover their full potential," 15 Feb. 2020 Paris is home to a large expatriate population, many of them Americans. Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY, "Iowa's caucusgoers have a new place to vote: overseas," 1 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The emirate, otherwise known for a ceramics factory bearing its initials RAK, has worked to increase tourism, offering itself as a secondary destination in the UAE or a quick holiday for the country’s millions of expatriate workers. Jon Gambrell, chicagotribune.com, "UAE sheikhdom hopes Bear Grylls camp draws pandemic tourists," 9 Oct. 2020 The Anglo-Dutch major offered voluntary severance, scaled back recruitment and reviewed expatriate staff contracts. Laura Hurst, Bloomberg.com, "Shell to Cut Up to 9,000 Jobs as Virus Accelerates Overhaul," 30 Sep. 2020 During a chance encounter with Seymour Hersh, the investigative journalist suggested that Barron contact Demetracopoulos, a Greek expatriate living in Washington who once tried to expose the money scheme. Ann Marie Lipinski, Washington Post, "Pursuing truth — and fame — a reporter blurred journalism’s boundaries," 11 Sep. 2020 Qatar is perhaps the GCC state most heavily dependent on foreign labor with expatriate workers comprising 95% of the workforce. Simone Foxman, Bloomberg.com, "Qatar Enacts Minimum Wage, Worker Reforms as World Cup Nears," 29 Aug. 2020 Then, on the eve of his 90th birthday in 2018, the British expatriate decided to send the three-and-a-half-foot chunk of rock back to its original home: Stonehenge. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "Archaeologists Pinpoint Origins of Stonehenge’s Mysterious Megaliths," 31 July 2020 Hassan urged every expatriate or foreigner returning to Lebanon not to leave their hotels until they are tested and cleared. Bassem Mroue, Star Tribune, "Sharp rise in virus cases in Lebanon after deadly port blast," 17 Aug. 2020 For Dubai’s small but growing Jewish expatriate population, the UAE’s move toward diplomatic ties represents a new achievement. The Salt Lake Tribune, "Telephone calls between the UAE and Israel ring for the first time," 17 Aug. 2020 The Wall Street Journal highlighted earlier this month that the expatriate community is shrinking, and recruiters are unable to sway workers to remain in or relocate to the city swathed in tumult and uncertainty. Fox News, "China's national security law triggering radical transformation of Hong Kong's human rights," 14 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expatriate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of expatriate

Verb

1768, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Adjective

1812, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1818, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for expatriate

Verb

Medieval Latin expatriatus, past participle of expatriare to leave one's own country, from Latin ex- + patria native country, from feminine of patrius of a father, from patr-, pater father — more at father

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Time Traveler for expatriate

Time Traveler

The first known use of expatriate was in 1768

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Statistics for expatriate

Last Updated

19 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Expatriate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expatriate. Accessed 29 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for expatriate

expatriate

noun
How to pronounce expatriate (audio) How to pronounce expatriate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of expatriate

: a person who lives in a foreign country

expatriate

verb
ex·​pa·​tri·​ate | \ ek-ˈspā-trē-ˌāt How to pronounce expatriate (audio) \
expatriated; expatriating

Legal Definition of expatriate

transitive verb

: to voluntarily withdraw (oneself) from allegiance to one's native country

intransitive verb

: to renounce allegiance to one's country and abandon one's nationality voluntarily

Other Words from expatriate

expatriate \ -​trē-​ət \ noun
expatriation \ ek-​ˌspā-​trē-​ˈā-​shən How to pronounce expatriation (audio) \ noun

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