enfranchise

verb
en·​fran·​chise | \in-ˈfran-ˌchīz, en-\
enfranchised; enfranchising

Definition of enfranchise 

transitive verb

1 : to set free (as from slavery)

2 : to endow with a franchise: such as

a : to admit to the privileges of a citizen and especially to the right of suffrage

b : to admit (a municipality) to political privileges or rights

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Other Words from enfranchise

enfranchisement \in-​ˈfran-​ˌchīz-​mənt, -​chəz-​, en-​ \ noun

Examples of enfranchise in a Sentence

in a way, modern labor-saving appliances enfranchised people, giving them much more leisure time

Recent Examples on the Web

Of course, this move was not applicable to all women; for example, Native American women were not fully enfranchised in Utah until 1956, as a result of a ruling in Utah’s Supreme Court. Kate Kelly, Teen Vogue, "Why the United States Constitution Needs An Equal Rights Amendment," 29 Oct. 2018 If passed, the bill would enfranchise up to 10,600 16- and 17-year-olds, according to Census Bureau data. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: Five times Anthony Kennedy was the fifth vote shows the significance of his retirement," 28 June 2018 The two-year exercise of making Dust also succeeded in helping Wright feel re-enfranchised with co-writing again. Gary Graff, Billboard, "Adam Wright Spins Dark Revenge Tale on 'Billy, Get Your Bike': Premiere," 22 June 2018 Republicans say the integrity of the process demands ensuring that only the eligible vote, while Democrats say that voter fraud is practically nonexistent and that the goal should be to enfranchise all who are eligible. The Washington Post, OregonLive.com, "Supreme Court upholds Ohio's purges of its voter rolls," 11 June 2018 Confirmed by the Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson — a seminal decision of 1896 that has long been considered one of the court’s least felicitous — the doctrine enfranchised the separation of the races in public facilities. Margalit Fox, New York Times, "Dovey Johnson Roundtree, Barrier-Breaking Lawyer, Dies at 104," 21 May 2018 New Mexico, where Native Americans now account for about 10.5 percent of the population, was the last state to enfranchise them, in 1962, according to the Library of Congress. Simon Romero, New York Times, "New Mexico Could Elect First Native American Woman to Congress," 6 June 2018 The election impact of re-enfranchising tens of thousands of new voters in a particular state is unclear. Jon Kamp, WSJ, "A Voting Rights Push: Allowing Felons to Cast Ballots," 10 May 2018 The District of Columbia — both a city and pseudo-state wrapped up into one — could enfranchise 16- and-17-year-olds for all elections, from selecting members of advisory neighborhood councils to the next occupant of the White House. NBC News, "Washington, D.C., may let 16-year-olds vote for president. Is that a good idea?," 17 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'enfranchise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of enfranchise

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for enfranchise

Middle English, from Anglo-French enfranchiss-, stem of enfranchir, from en- + franc free — more at frank

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enfouldred

enframe

enfranch

enfranchise

enfranchiser

enfume

eng

Statistics for enfranchise

Last Updated

16 Nov 2018

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Time Traveler for enfranchise

The first known use of enfranchise was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for enfranchise

enfranchise

verb

English Language Learners Definition of enfranchise

: to give (someone) the legal right to vote

enfranchise

transitive verb
en·​fran·​chise | \in-ˈfran-ˌchīz \
enfranchised; enfranchising

Legal Definition of enfranchise 

: to grant franchise to especially : to admit to the privileges of a citizen and especially to voting rights the Twenty-sixth Amendment enfranchised all citizens over 18 years of age — compare emancipate

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More from Merriam-Webster on enfranchise

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for enfranchise

Spanish Central: Translation of enfranchise

Nglish: Translation of enfranchise for Spanish Speakers

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