emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Scientists have typically detected them through incredibly bright lights surrounding them, emanating from a black hole's accretion disk. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "How They Got the Black Hole Picture That Changed Science," 10 Apr. 2019 The probe's instruments showed the band of the Milky Way and picked up evidence of the solar wind, the constant stream of particles emanating from the sun. Elizabeth Howell, Space.com, "Here Comes the Sun! Parker Solar Probe Instruments See 'First Light'," 25 Sep. 2018 At the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Atlantic City, where the Trump Taj Mahal used to be, the only sound emanating about its sportsbook is similar to chirping crickets. Ed Barkowitz, Philly.com, "While Ocean Resort revels in its sportsbook, the Hard Rock is silent," 21 June 2018 Notably, this is a movie without a bad guy, where the tension emanates from the real-feeling challenge of juggling more responsibility than one harried mom can bear alone. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Tully' shines and 'Overboard' sinks during break from blockbusters," 3 May 2018 Jibs Brown is all about establishing a pure, simple groove, something to rock to or to sway to, while warm vibes emanate from an ensemble of bass, guitars, drums and saxophones. Jeff Milo, Detroit Free Press, "Hamtramck Music Fest to showcase 160 acts over 3 days; here are 8 not to miss," 28 Feb. 2018 Skepticism will emanate from both sides of the aisle when Trump enters the House chamber for the primetime address to lawmakers and the nation. Julie Pace, The Seattle Times, "Trump to call for unity, face skepticism in State of Union," 4 Feb. 2019 Given that medical marijuana is legal in Illinois, and recreational marijuana use could be legalized at some point in the future, does the board have enforcement rights to prevent marijuana smoke from emanating out of units? Howard Dakoff, chicagotribune.com, "In condo association, what's the difference between a committee and a commission?," 3 July 2018 Some of the complaints about Mr. Baker emanated from The Journal’s Washington bureau, which had bristled at his leadership role, given his past as an outspoken critic of President Barack Obama. Michael M. Grynbaum, New York Times, "Wall Street Journal, Its Newsroom Unsettled, Names a New Editor," 5 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Learn More about emanate

Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

24 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emanate

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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More from Merriam-Webster on emanate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with emanate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for emanate

Spanish Central: Translation of emanate

Nglish: Translation of emanate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of emanate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on emanate

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