emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The stakes are made clear by the sheer number of falsehoods that emanate from the president’s lips, and from his Twitter account. Isaac Stanley-becker, The Seattle Times, "Critics demand networks fact-check Trump’s live immigration speech," 8 Jan. 2019 Several members out of the Pro Era collective followed suit by releasing a selection of their own mixtapes, EPs and albums that showed the pure talent that emanated from the budding rap group. Mark Elibert, Billboard, "Pro Era's Chuck Strangers on Debut Album 'Consumers Park,' Best Advice From Capital Steez & Working With Alchemist," 8 Mar. 2018 The nostalgic, smoky smell of the barbecue was unavoidable, emanating almost as far as the music. BostonGlobe.com, "At Juneteenth, black Bostonians celebrate identity, unity in spirited cookout," 16 June 2018 Excessive noise, South Belvoir Boulevard: At 2:25 a.m. April 27, police conducted a traffic stop on a bus carrying several people due to loud music emanating from the vehicle. Jeff Piorkowski/special To Cleveland.com, cleveland.com, "Party bus music is too much: University Heights police blotter," 2 May 2018 This is deeply troubling behavior once again emanating from Russia. Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY, "Accused Russian hacker extradited to U.S. to face charges he attacked Dropbox, LinkedIn," 2 Apr. 2018 This is deeply troubling behavior once again emanating from Russia. Cyrus Farivar, Ars Technica, "Finally extradited from Europe, suspected LinkedIn hacker faces US charges," 30 Mar. 2018 This is what Terenzi heard back in 1987: a dark, eerie sound emanating from a galaxy 180 million light years away. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "Meet the Astronomer Who Listens to the Music of the Cosmos," 12 May 2015 Viewers now know that scenario is a possibility, although the finale shrewdly planted the seeds for future discord (this is a drama, after all), emanating from those who had been Rick's closing allies. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'The Walking Dead' finale mercifully brings Negan war to an end," 15 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

13 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emanate

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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More from Merriam-Webster on emanate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with emanate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for emanate

Spanish Central: Translation of emanate

Nglish: Translation of emanate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of emanate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on emanate

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