emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web In Emerald Hills, two segments emanate from Emerald Hills Park: Old Memory Lane to Roswell Street and Tooley Street to 60th Street. David Garrick, San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego tinkers with ‘slow streets’ in response to praise, backlash," 9 Oct. 2020 Soft totalitarianism will not emanate from the government, pace George Orwell. James E. Person Jr., National Review, "Rod Dreher’s Advice for Christians in a Secular Age," 17 Sep. 2020 Music by Lambert, Luke Combs, Jimmie Allen and Tim McGraw will emanate from the Bluebird, and if any of them should win, executives in the production truck outside the Opry House will quickly switch the live feed to that locale. Tom Roland, Billboard, "Nashville's Bluebird Cafe Becomes Awards-Show Venue as ACM Adjusts to COVID-19," 15 Sep. 2020 Every deer hunter knows to look for travel corridors, but the best ones find hubs from which buck routes emanate like spokes on a wheel. Scott Bestul, Field & Stream, "The Complete Guide to Hunting Deer from a Treestand," 11 Sep. 2020 Income inequality is kind of the umbrella under which any kind of health disparities seems to emanate from. Pratibha Gopalakrishna, STAT, "How Lyft’s growing medical business is trying to close gaps in health care access," 10 Sep. 2020 The show will emanate from the 50-yard line at Truist Field, hours before the Demon Deacons host Clemson. Rainer Sabin, Detroit Free Press, "College football moves on without Michigan football, MSU," 5 Sep. 2020 Noxious fumes would emanate from the machine, making my nose wrinkle. Blair Kamin, chicagotribune.com, "Column: Meet the secret weapon for fighting the pandemic: Interior architects," 28 Aug. 2020 Fast radio bursts are pulses of radio waves that emanate from a distant point in the cosmos. Jennifer Leman, Popular Mechanics, "Mysterious Repeating Radio Burst From Space Is Back, Exactly Right on Time," 27 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Learn More about emanate

Time Traveler for emanate

Time Traveler

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Emanate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emanate. Accessed 26 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb
How to pronounce emanate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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Comments on emanate

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