elevate

adjective
el·​e·​vate | \ ˈe-lə-ˌvāt How to pronounce elevate (audio) , -vət\

Definition of elevate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

archaic

elevate

verb
el·​e·​vate | \ ˈe-lə-ˌvāt How to pronounce elevate (audio) \
elevated; elevating

Definition of elevate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to lift up or make higher : raise elevate a patient's leg exercises that elevate the heart rate
2 : to raise in rank or status was elevated to chairman
3 : to improve morally, intellectually, or culturally great books that both entertain and elevate their readers
4 : to raise the spirits of : elate

intransitive verb

: to become elevated : rise his voice elevated to a shout

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Synonyms & Antonyms for elevate

Synonyms: Verb

elate, enrapture, exhilarate, intoxicate, transport

Antonyms: Verb

depress

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Choose the Right Synonym for elevate

Verb

lift, raise, rear, elevate, hoist, heave, boost mean to move from a lower to a higher place or position. lift usually implies exerting effort to overcome resistance of weight. lift the chair while I vacuum raise carries a stronger implication of bringing up to the vertical or to a high position. scouts raising a flagpole rear may add an element of suddenness to raise. suddenly reared itself up on its hind legs elevate may replace lift or raise especially when exalting or enhancing is implied. elevated the taste of the public hoist implies lifting something heavy especially by mechanical means. hoisted the cargo on board heave implies lifting and throwing with great effort or strain. heaved the heavy crate inside boost suggests assisting to climb or advance by a push. boosted his brother over the fence

Examples of elevate in a Sentence

Verb

exercises that elevate the heart rate seeing their son ordained as a priest was one of the most elevating moments in their lives

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

An average of 3,000 of the 25,000 Milwaukee children tested for lead each year have elevated lead levels, the Journal Sentinel previously reported. Alison Dirr, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Council adopts ordinance preventing landlords from evicting tenants seeking to address lead," 9 July 2019 And plenty of Democratic voters are unlikely to be excited about elevating another billionaire to office. Casey Tolan, The Mercury News, "Tom Steyer joins presidential race, reversing earlier decision not to run," 9 July 2019 These views help account for why the nearly two dozen Democratic presidential candidates have elevated the issue of climate change and now endorse more aggressive policies than those adopted under Barack Obama. Washington Post, "Trump defends environmental record that critics call disastrous," 9 July 2019 But in historic neighborhoods, elevating individual structures is controversial. Cornelia Dean, New York Times, "‘We Cannot Save Everything’: A Historic Neighborhood Confronts Rising Seas," 8 July 2019 Low stream flows decrease holding and staging refuges and elevate vulnerability and pressure on the Chinook. USA TODAY, "Roller coaster ghost town, Alaska heat, rock hyrax pups: News from around our 50 states," 8 July 2019 Kennedy will discuss her father, President John F. Kennedy, and his role in elevating the space program. Hal Boedeker, orlandosentinel.com, "Apollo 11: Norah O’Donnell to anchor ‘CBS Evening News’ from Kennedy Space Center," 8 July 2019 These views help account for why the nearly two dozen Democratic presidential candidates have elevated the issue of climate change and now endorse more aggressive policies than those adopted under Barack Obama. Seung Min Kim, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump defends environmental record that critics call disastrous," 8 July 2019 The step was praised by Pope Francis as a move towards peace, but blasted by the president's 2020 rivals as elevating a dictator without getting any hard concessions in return; Kristin Fisher reports from the White House. Barnini Chakraborty, Fox News, "North Korea says US is 'hell-bent on hostile acts' despite peace talks," 5 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'elevate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of elevate

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for elevate

Verb

Middle English, from Latin elevatus, past participle of elevare, from e- + levare to raise — more at lever

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Statistics for elevate

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for elevate

The first known use of elevate was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for elevate

elevate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of elevate

: to lift (something) up
: to increase the level of (something) : to make (something) higher
: to raise (someone) to a higher rank or level

elevate

verb
el·​e·​vate | \ ˈe-lə-ˌvāt How to pronounce elevate (audio) \
elevated; elevating

Kids Definition of elevate

: to lift up : raise

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More from Merriam-Webster on elevate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with elevate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for elevate

Spanish Central: Translation of elevate

Nglish: Translation of elevate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of elevate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on elevate

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