intoxicate

adjective
in·tox·i·cate | \ in-ˈtäk-si-kət \

Definition of intoxicate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intoxicate

verb
in·tox·i·cate | \ in-ˈtäk-sə-ˌkāt \
intoxicated; intoxicating

Definition of intoxicate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : poison

2a : to excite or stupefy by alcohol or a drug especially to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished

b : to excite or elate to the point of enthusiasm or frenzy

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Synonyms & Antonyms for intoxicate

Synonyms: Verb

elate, elevate, enrapture, exhilarate, transport

Antonyms: Verb

depress

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Did You Know?

Verb

For those who think that alcohol and drugs qualify as poisons, the history of intoxicate offers some etymological evidence to bolster your argument. Intoxicate traces back to toxicum, the Latin word for "poison" - and the earliest meaning of intoxicate was just that: "to poison." This sense is now extremely rare, and we currently talk about such harmless things as flowers and perfume having the power to intoxicate. Toxicum turns up in the etymologies of a number of other English words including toxic ("poisonous"), intoxicant ("something that intoxicates") and detoxify ("to remove a poison from"), as well as a number of the names for various poisons themselves.

Examples of intoxicate in a Sentence

Verb

The little bit of beer I drank was not enough to intoxicate me. the stunning spectacle of this Las Vegas show is sure to intoxicate spectators

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Netflix spent lavishly to promote its shows, recognizing that such acclaim can be intoxicating for talent, who are leaving traditional TV studios to work with Netflix. Meg James, latimes.com, "Netflix nudges past HBO to top Emmy nominations list with 112," 12 July 2018 The driver of the second car and the pickup were both believed to be intoxicated, authorities said. Keri Blakinger, Houston Chronicle, "Woman thrown from car, killed in three-vehicle Beltway 8 wreck," 9 July 2018 On the day he was introduced, new coach Steve Clifford reminded us of just how innovative, interesting and intoxicating the Orlando Magic used to be. Mike Bianchi, OrlandoSentinel.com, "An appeal to new coach Steve Clifford: Reinvent Stan Plan and make Orlando Magic fun again," 3 June 2018 Students got kicked out and carried out by security for various reasons, including starting fights or being intoxicated. Cristela Guerra, BostonGlobe.com, "At UMass Amherst, Cardi B dazzles the crowd with rapping, twerking, and a pep talk," 26 Apr. 2018 The former first overall pick has intoxicated organizations for nearly a decade with his alluring mix of checkdowns, flashes of brilliance, and knee injuries, and the latest stop on his run will be in Arizona. Jeremy Cluff, azcentral, "NFL free agency grades: Pundits slam Sam Bradford to Arizona Cardinals?," 13 Mar. 2018 Family members told officers the man may have been intoxicated, according to the release. Rick Kambic, chicagotribune.com, "Man taken into custody after standoff in Vernon Hills, police say," 9 July 2018 Several residents told authorities Washington was intoxicated most of the time, causing her to give out medication to the wrong patient, the wrong dosage of medication or not give any medication at all, according to records. Kelsey Mo, azcentral, "2 suspected of abusing disabled adults in El Mirage unlicensed care facility," 2 July 2018 Allsup had been arrested Oct. 5 after he was found passed out and allegedly intoxicated on the Kennesaw State campus. Campbell Lutz, ajc, "Former KSU professor accused of having pipe bomb in his SUV," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intoxicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intoxicate

Adjective

1581, in the meaning defined above

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for intoxicate

Verb

Middle English, from Medieval Latin intoxicatus, past participle of intoxicare, from Latin in- + toxicum poison — more at toxic

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Time Traveler for intoxicate

The first known use of intoxicate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for intoxicate

intoxicate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of intoxicate

of alcohol, a drug, etc. : to make (someone) unable to think and behave normally

: to excite or please (someone) in a way that suggests the effect of alcohol or a drug

intoxicate

verb
in·tox·i·cate | \ in-ˈtäk-sə-ˌkāt \
intoxicated; intoxicating

Kids Definition of intoxicate

1 : to affect by alcohol or a drug especially so that normal thinking and acting becomes difficult or impossible : make drunk

2 : to make wildly excited or enthusiastic Intoxicated as he was with the heavens, he couldn't imagine needing anything on earth. —Katherine Paterson, Bridge to Terabithia

intoxicate

transitive verb
in·tox·i·cate | \ -sə-ˌkāt \
intoxicated; intoxicating

Medical Definition of intoxicate 

1 : poison

2 : to excite or stupefy by alcohol or a drug especially to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished

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intoxicate

transitive verb
in·tox·i·cate | \ in-ˈtäk-sə-ˌkāt \
intoxicated; intoxicating

Legal Definition of intoxicate 

: to excite or stupefy by alcohol or a drug especially to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished — see also driving under the influence

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