disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing; disgraces

Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to be a source of shame to Your actions disgraced the family.
2 : to cause to lose favor (see favor entry 1 sense 1a(2)) or standing was disgraced by the hint of scandal
3 archaic : to humiliate by a superior showing thy whiteness … shall disgrace the swan— Robert Browning

disgrace

noun

Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the condition of one fallen from grace : the condition of one who has lost honor (see honor entry 1 sense 1a) left in disgrace
b : loss of grace, favor, or honor brought disgrace upon the family
2 : a source of shame Your manners are a disgrace. He's a disgrace to the profession.

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Other Words from disgrace

Verb

disgracer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for disgrace

Noun

disgrace, dishonor, disrepute, infamy, ignominy mean the state or condition of suffering loss of esteem and of enduring reproach. disgrace often implies humiliation and sometimes ostracism. sent home in disgrace dishonor emphasizes the loss of honor that one has enjoyed or the loss of self-esteem. preferred death to life with dishonor disrepute stresses loss of one's good name or the acquiring of a bad reputation. a once proud name fallen into disrepute infamy usually implies notoriety as well as exceeding shame. a day that lives in infamy ignominy stresses humiliation. the ignominy of being arrested

Examples of disgrace in a Sentence

Verb Many feel that the mayor has disgraced the town government by accepting personal favors from local businesspeople. He felt he had disgraced himself by failing at school. Noun The secret was protected out of a fear of political disgrace. Many feel that the mayor has brought disgrace upon the town. She was forced to leave in disgrace. His table manners are a disgrace. The health-care system is a national disgrace.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb As a leading public figure with the capacity either to inspire (à la Einstein) or to disgrace (à la Roth)? New York Times, "Cynthia Ozick Calls the New Philip Roth Biography a ‘Narrative Masterwork’," 1 Apr. 2021 This is praise, of a sort: for over a century now, the Windsors have been in a class of their own for providing spectacle, scandal, feud, tragedy, and disgrace—and doing very well out of it. Matt Seaton, The New York Review of Books, "The Great Disenchantment: Harry, Meghan & the Monarchy," 9 Mar. 2021 His downfall shows how repressive governments can move with stunning speed to disgrace their opponents, using social media and technology to amplify their divisive campaigns. BostonGlobe.com, "Threatened by Facebook disinformation, a Buddhist monk flees Cambodia," 23 Aug. 2020 Pop stars who spitefully deny the pleasure and acknowledgment of listeners who come from different political perspectives disgrace the very meaning of artistic expression. Armond White, National Review, "The Stones’ ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’ — Redefined," 22 Apr. 2020 The service was then known as the Night Rider, and the ride would not have disgraced a rodeo. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "The Enduring Romance of the Night Train," 4 May 2020 But this one swallowed his pride, and whispered flattery to his abuser, like Wormtongue in another kingdom, and praised the wisdom of the man who disgraced him. John Archibald | Jarchibald@al.com, al, "The Legend of Six White Men of a Certain Age," 12 Feb. 2020 The Republicans are selling their souls to the devil and disgracing themselves to maintain their seats in Congress. Anthony Man, sun-sentinel.com, "Conservative Christian pastor says he ‘asked and begged God’ for Donald Trump’s impeachment," 15 Oct. 2019 In 2011, recently elected as FFF president after the national men’s team had disgraced itself at the World Cup, Mr. Le Graët went to Germany for the Women’s World Cup. Peter Ford, The Christian Science Monitor, "No longer sidelined, women’s soccer attracts players and fans in France," 27 June 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Nearly all of them had tumultuous careers, rising to the height of popularity and then, with the exception of Britten, falling into disgrace or poverty-stricken straits. Brandy Schillace, WSJ, "‘Out of the Shadows’ Review: Spirited Women," 30 Apr. 2021 The tightrope between respectability and disgrace was not available to them: irreverent daring too easily read as punishable presumption. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, "The Lost Legacy of the Girl Stunt Reporter," 29 Apr. 2021 This re-institutionalization of the old and mentally ill was a disgrace that proved deadly during the pandemic. Sarah E. Ryan, Time, "History's Lesson for Activists Who Want to Defund the Police," 20 Apr. 2021 That on some level Lloyd recognizes this only underscores the depth of his denial and disgrace. David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times, "Review: Cynthia Ozick, nearly 93, writes her age in the evocative novella “Antiquities”," 14 Apr. 2021 While there is no disgrace in losing to the team in second, this was another match where Spurs failed to defend a lead. Robert Kidd, Forbes, "After Losing To Manchester United, Tottenham Hotspur Faces Big Decisions This Summer," 11 Apr. 2021 Most notably, The Milwaukee Journal's Editorial Board was an early critic of Sen. Joseph McCarthy, pointing out his lies and propaganda years before his career ended in public disgrace. David D. Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Why we publish editorials: An independent voice for Wisconsin helps hold the powerful to account," 3 Mar. 2021 Anyone else in George Brignac’s shoes — saddled with the disgrace that accompanies his name — might have gotten the hell out of Dodge and tried to reinvent himself, to outrun the shame. David A. Hammer, NOLA.com, "Monster in our midst: Despite predatory past, deacon welcomed back to Catholic institutions," 17 Dec. 2020 The lack of shame, radicalization and willingness to destroy what is sacred -- our democracy -- is nothing short of a disgrace and stain on this country. courant.com, "Readers Speak: The election is over; time for Trump to move on," 16 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disgrace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disgrace

Verb

1580, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Noun

1586, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for disgrace

Noun and Verb

Middle French, from Old Italian disgrazia, from dis- (from Latin) + grazia grace, from Latin gratia — more at grace

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Time Traveler for disgrace

Time Traveler

The first known use of disgrace was in 1580

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Statistics for disgrace

Last Updated

21 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Disgrace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disgrace. Accessed 7 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for disgrace

disgrace

verb

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to feel ashamed
: to cause (someone or something) to lose or become unworthy of respect or approval

disgrace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

: the condition of feeling ashamed or of losing or becoming unworthy of respect or approval
: something that you are or should be ashamed of

disgrace

verb
dis·​grace | \ di-ˈskrās How to pronounce disgrace (audio) , dis-ˈgrās \
disgraced; disgracing

Kids Definition of disgrace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bring shame to Her behavior disgraced the family.

disgrace

noun

Kids Definition of disgrace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the condition of being looked down on : loss of respect He resigned in disgrace.
2 : a cause of shame It was a disgrace to be chained, and he felt it deeply …— Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie

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Comments on disgrace

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