dig

verb
\ ˈdig How to pronounce dig (audio) \
dug\ ˈdəg How to pronounce dug (audio) \; digging

Definition of dig

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to break up, turn, or loosen (earth) with an implement digging dirt with a shovel machines digging up the road
b : to prepare the soil of dig a garden
2a : to bring to the surface by digging : unearth dig potatoes
b : to bring to light or out of hiding dig up facts
3 : to hollow out or form by removing earth : excavate dig a hole dig a tunnel
4 : to drive down so as to penetrate : thrust dug her toes into the sand The hawk dug its claws into its prey.
5 : poke, prod dug me in the ribs with his elbow

6 slang

a : to pay attention to : notice dig that fancy hat
b : understand, appreciate couldn't dig the medical jargon
c : like, admire High school students dig short poetry.— David Burmester

intransitive verb

1 : to turn up, loosen, or remove earth digging in the garden dig for buried treasure
2 : to work hard or laboriously
3 : to advance by or as if by removing or pushing aside material digging into the history of the company

dig

noun

Definition of dig (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : thrust, poke a dig in the ribs
b : a cutting remark a subtle dig at their lack of preparedness

2 digs plural

a : accommodations (see accommodation sense 1a) for living or working buying furniture for his new digs
b chiefly British : lodging sense 2b
3 : an archaeological excavation site also : the excavation itself participated in a dig

Definition of dig (Entry 3 of 3)

digest

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Synonyms for dig

Synonyms: Verb

excavate, shovel

Synonyms: Noun

dab, jab, lunge, poke

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Examples of dig in a Sentence

Verb

Some animal has been digging in the garden. They dug into the sand with their hands. He dug down about 10 feet before he hit water. Dig a hole three feet deep. The first step in building a house is to dig the foundation. The prisoners escaped by digging a tunnel under the fence. digging clams on the beach These detectives won't stop digging until they find out what happened.

Noun

She gave me a dig in the ribs to get my attention. She participated in a dig last summer.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Luckily, psychologists also happen to have some very useful tools for digging themselves out of a funk. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "What 8 Psychologists Do to Get Through Their Crappiest Days," 21 Mar. 2019 Rolle started a GoFundMe on January 14 seeking $123,000 to dig herself out of the hole caused by Fyre Fest—and people are stepping up to help. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "The Fyre Festival Caterer Who Lost Her Life Savings Has Received Over $160K in Donations," 22 Jan. 2019 Throw in all the twists and turns as journalists dig into the matter and the testimony that will rivet the nation next week under the glare of television lights. Howard Kurtz, Fox News, "The moral and political dilemma created by Kavanaugh's accuser," 18 Sep. 2018 Then again the anniversary is perfectly timed in another way, coming just as Derek Jeter is digging into his first year as the new owner-out-front. Greg Cote, miamiherald, "Marlins' 25th Anniversary Weekend underlines Derek Jeter's obligation to heal deep wounds," 9 June 2018 The egg hunt takes place on the first and second floors of the museums, which means kids will dig through fire tricks and hoses to find treasure. Amanda Garrity, Good Housekeeping, "We Found the Best Easter Egg Hunts Near New York City," 11 Mar. 2019 Musk's Boring Company digs tunnels for advanced transport systems and has advanced ground-penetrating radar. Kaitlyn Schallhorn, Fox News, "Thai soccer team rescue might need to happen sooner than expected, experts warn," 2 Oct. 2018 One report by Amnesty International in 2015 detailed gruesome ceremonial killings that involved forcing detainees to dig their own graves and slitting their throats without trial. Alexander Smith /, NBC News, "What is Boko Haram, the militant group terrorizing Nigeria?," 19 June 2018 That’s not going to work in most backyards, but perhaps someone could help your daughter with a smaller version that could dig down 18 or 24 inches and get all the roots out. Neil Sperry, San Antonio Express-News, "No garden invader is more difficult to eliminate than bamboo," 15 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And that isn’t (just) a dig on Tucker’s parenting abilities. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Despite What Tucker Carlson Thinks, Women Aren't Something to Possess," 19 Mar. 2019 Gehry’s vision for 8150 Sunset might offer just that, and groundbreaking at the site could be akin to an archaeological dig, possibly offering people a glimpse into Hollywood’s past. Lesley M.m. Blume, Town & Country, "Inside Frank Gehry's Overhaul of Garden of Allah, L.A.’s Most Infamous Corner," 25 Feb. 2019 Led team in kills with 284, while adding 93 digs, 28 blocks and 16 aces. Staff Reports, latimes.com, "All-Area Boys' Volleyball First Team," 1 July 2018 Evan Carroll steadied Barrington with 15 assists against Glenbard West, while Michael O’Toole had eight kills and Kyle Vasquez added five digs. Chicago Tribune, chicagotribune.com, "Barrington falls to Glenbard West in state quarterfinals," 4 June 2018 Her spokeswoman attempted to blow it off, and Donald Trump said the jacket was a dig at the media. Hilary Weaver, Vanities, "Can Anti-Melania Outerwear Activism Catch On?," 22 June 2018 There is also a dig into the concept of free speech, which is constitutionally protected but misunderstood. Kevin Williams, chicagotribune.com, "NFL's shortsighted anthem policy spits in the face of American ideals," 23 May 2018 Some point to the demolition of a nearby government building, which could have sent rats scooting to new digs. Ian Lovett, WSJ, "Politics Is a Dirty Business—Starting with the Rats at Los Angeles City Hall," 10 Feb. 2019 Faulconer previously said in a commentary published in The San Diego Union-Tribune that city police work to protect everyone regardless of immigration status, an apparent dig at Trump’s approach to immigration enforcement. Julie Watson, The Seattle Times, "San Diego mayor unveils plan to integrate immigrants," 4 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dig.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dig

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1797, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for dig

Verb and Noun

Middle English diggen

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Statistics for dig

Last Updated

19 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dig

The first known use of dig was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for dig

dig

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dig

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move soil, sand, snow, etc., in order to create a hole
: to form (a hole, tunnel, etc.) by removing soil, sand, snow, etc.
: to uncover (something that is underground) by moving earth, soil, sand, etc.

dig

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dig (Entry 2 of 2)

: a push with a body part (such as your elbow) : a poke or thrust
: a criticism or insult that is directed toward a particular person or group
: a place where scientists try to find buried objects by digging also : the act of digging for buried objects

dig

verb
\ ˈdig How to pronounce dig (audio) \
dug\ ˈdəg \; digging

Kids Definition of dig

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to turn up, loosen, or remove the soil The dog was digging in the garden again.
2 : to turn up or remove with a shovel or by similar means I dug into the snow.
3 : to form by removing earth dig a hole dig a cellar
4 : to uncover or search by or as if by turning up earth They dug for gold.
5 : prod entry 1 sense 1, poke He dug me in the ribs.
dig in
: to begin eating Supper's ready, so dig in.
dig into
1 : to begin eating He dug into a plate of pasta.
2 : to try to discover information Reporters were digging into the story.
dig up
1 : to uncover or remove (as from soil) dig up a bush
2 : discover I dug up information about her past.

dig

noun

Kids Definition of dig (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : poke entry 2 a dig in the ribs
2 : a place where buried objects are being uncovered a dinosaur dig
3 : a project to uncover buried objects The bones were found during a recent dig.
4 : a nasty remark She got in a dig about forgetting her birthday.

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More from Merriam-Webster on dig

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with dig

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for dig

Spanish Central: Translation of dig

Nglish: Translation of dig for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of dig for Arabic Speakers

Comments on dig

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