jab

verb
\ ˈjab How to pronounce jab (audio) \
jabbed; jabbing

Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to pierce with or as if with a sharp object : stab
b : to poke quickly or abruptly : thrust
2 : to strike with a short straight blow
3 : to pointedly tease or mock (someone) We joke around. … I was jabbing him about injuries he's had.Sports Illustrated

intransitive verb

1 : to make quick or abrupt thrusts with a sharp object
2 : to strike a person with a short straight blow
3 : to pointedly tease, mock, or make fun of someone At a moment's notice, he can produce a months-old editorial cartoon jabbing at him and seems genuinely hurt by the message.The New York Times

jab

noun

Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act of jabbing especially : a short straight boxing punch delivered with the leading hand
2 : a pointed and often mocking comment or criticism He has a lot of fun with Ranovic, the oh-so-dramatic, eager young undercover cop who consistently fails to understand Salter's ironic jabs.— Jean MacFarlane Wright Undeterred, McCain continues with his standard stump speech, leaving in all the anti-Bush jabs.— Michelle Cottle

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Examples of jab in a Sentence

Verb He jabbed at the other player with his hockey stick. The needle jabbed his arm. The needle jabbed into his arm. Noun She gave him a jab in the ribs. He threw a right jab to his opponent's body.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The McConnell spot also jabbed at McGrath, but in that instance Kentucky's Democratic governor did not speak out against the use of his image in the advertisement. Phillip M. Bailey, The Courier-Journal, "Amy McGrath 'strongly' stands by ad despite Republican governors' objections," 16 May 2020 President Donald Trump, once friendly with Stephenson, wasted no time jabbing him over his departure. NBC News, "AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson to step down," 24 Apr. 2020 McConnell has eagerly jabbed at Democrats over the issue in the past several weeks. Phillip M. Bailey, The Courier-Journal, "Joe Biden's sexual assault allegation puts Senate candidate Amy McGrath in a tough spot," 8 May 2020 Reid jabbed Sanders’s healthcare plan but refused to give his endorsement to any of the candidates ahead of Nevada’s caucuses on Saturday. Madison Dibble, Washington Examiner, "Harry Reid on Medicare for All: ‘Not a chance in hell it would pass’," 19 Feb. 2020 The suspect appeared to wield at least one sharp object and attempted to jab the man with it several times. Fox News, "UK man, 77, ‘bravely’ fights off ATM mugger in boxing match caught on video," 20 Feb. 2020 After Biden took a jab at Steyer, a former hedge fund manager, for investing in a private prison company, Steyer jabbed back at Biden for writing a crime bill that Steyer said led to mass incarceration of black and Latino men. USA TODAY, "Democratic debate FactCheck: Bloomberg misleads on tax returns, Biden flubs gun violence stat," 26 Feb. 2020 Fewer people dotting the surrounding neighborhood slumping against walls, jabbing needles into their necks and discarding dirty syringes on the sidewalks. Heather Knight, SFChronicle.com, "Bold SF drug-injection site plan faces just one big hurdle: Trump," 26 Oct. 2019 But to get jabbed by the president of a mediocre Pac-12 school that isn’t even on the Wolverines level in terms of talent, wins, NFL players or any other standard of measurement over the past five years, is ridiculous. Jeremy Cluff, azcentral, "ASU president Michael Crow ripped for apparently ripping Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh," 17 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The pair often engage in playful social media ribbing, including a jab from Brady when Manning joined Twitter in May. Lindsay Kimble, PEOPLE.com, "ESPY Awards Poke Fun at Tom Brady with Tiger King-Inspired Spoof Starring J.K. Simmons," 21 June 2020 The aerial protest was taking a jab at Black Lives Matter supporters who want cities to divert money from police departments and into other social programs that could prevent crime. NBC News, "Noose found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall, NASCAR says," 14 June 2020 Newsom started his speech with an acknowledgment of Saturday’s uncommon format and a good-natured jab at his own age. Ron Kroichick, SFChronicle.com, "Newsom to Santa Clara graduates: ‘We can do more and do better’," 13 June 2020 During Floyd’s funeral in Texas last Tuesday, the Rev. Al Sharpton made reference to Goodell’s video before offering a jab at the NFL commissioner. NBC News, "After NFL admission on protests, does Colin Kaepernick have a shot at playing again?," 8 June 2020 On top of that, Gallimore possesses another improving counter move — the chop-spin — which isn’t as refined as Gallimore’s jab-club-arm over but could be even more effective in the NFL with some refinement. John Owning, Dallas News, "Film room: How CeeDee Lamb, other Cowboys draftees can make an immediate 2020 impact," 8 June 2020 In April the firm struck a landmark deal with Oxford University to distribute a potential jab. The Economist, "Schumpeter The quest for a vaccine could restore faith in big pharma," 6 June 2020 Finally Tomlinson took a jab at one of her Democratic primary rivals, Jon Ossoff, who, along with another contender, Sarah Riggs Amico, transferred their personal money into their respective campaigns. Caitlin Conant, CBS News, "2020 Daily Trail Markers: Trump declares "we will dominate the streets"," 1 June 2020 Beckham was taking a jab at Garrett ripping off Mason Rudolph’s helmet during the victory over the Steelers Nov. 14 and whacking him over the head with it. Mary Kay Cabot, cleveland, "Browns’ Odell Beckham Jr. and Myles Garrett trade good-natured jabs on Twitter," 18 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jab.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jab

Verb

1827, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1872, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for jab

Verb

alteration of job to strike

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Statistics for jab

Last Updated

6 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Jab.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jab. Accessed 10 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for jab

jab

verb
How to pronounce jab (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to push something sharp or hard quickly or suddenly into or toward someone or something
: to be pushed quickly and suddenly into someone or a part of someone's body

jab

noun

English Language Learners Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick or sudden hit with something sharp or hard
boxing : a short, straight punch
British, informal : an injection of something (such as medicine) into your body with a needle

jab

verb
\ ˈjab How to pronounce jab (audio) \
jabbed; jabbing

Kids Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to poke quickly or suddenly with or as if with something sharp He jabbed me with a stick.

jab

noun

Kids Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick or sudden poke

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More from Merriam-Webster on jab

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for jab

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with jab

Spanish Central: Translation of jab

Nglish: Translation of jab for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of jab for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about jab

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