depress

verb

de·​press di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio)
dē-
depressed; depressing; depresses

transitive verb

1
obsolete : repress, subjugate
2
a
: to press down
depress a typewriter key
b
: to cause to sink to a lower position
3
: to lessen the activity or strength of
drugs that may depress the appetite
4
: sadden, discourage
don't let the news depress you
5
: to decrease the market value or marketability of
depressible adjective

Example Sentences

The news seemed to depress him a little. I don't mean to depress you, but there's no way we can win. We were all depressed by the loss. You shouldn't let this kind of problem depress you. These changes could depress the economy. Market conditions are likely to depress earnings in the next quarter. depressing the price of a stock Slowly depress the car's brake pedal. Depress the “shift” key on your keyboard. The doctor will depress your tongue and look at your throat. See More
Recent Examples on the Web The proposal has garnered vocal opposition from labor groups worried about losing jobs and depressing wages. Alexander Coolidge, The Enquirer, 11 May 2023 Good weather in January and easy comparisons to last year __ when the coronavirus depressed demand __ helped increase sales. Dee-ann Durbin, Chicago Tribune, 25 Apr. 2023 The problem is that the fee has been depressing production of housing that the new proposal intends to encourage. Roger Valdez, Forbes, 17 Mar. 2023 Because the Fed’s war on inflation depressed both the value of the bonds Silicon Valley Bank was relying on for capital and the value of the tech startups the bank catered to. Matt Egan, CNN, 13 Mar. 2023 However, the downside of this feature is that there's a fair amount of travel time between starting to press the button and fully depressing it. Eric Ravenscraft, WIRED, 27 Feb. 2023 And Biden, after seeing his party expand its Senate majority last year in successful midterm elections, has both substantive and political reasons not to agree to a deal that would depress the Democratic base and cut federal programs that millions of Americans rely on. Anchorage Daily News, 2 Feb. 2023 The lack of a regular seasonal calendar in streaming has depressed pay further, the report says. Andrew Dalton, Chicago Tribune, 6 May 2023 Some people who are depressed are very good at hiding it. Philip Ellis, Men's Health, 2 May 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'depress.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Middle French depresser, from Latin depressus, past participle of deprimere to press down, from de- + premere to press — more at press

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of depress was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near depress

Cite this Entry

“Depress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/depress. Accessed 4 Jun. 2023.

Kids Definition

depress

verb
de·​press di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio)
1
a
: to press down
b
: to cause to sink to a lower position
2
: to lessen the activity or strength of
3
4
: to lessen in price or value : depreciate
depressible adjective
depressingly
-iŋ-lē
adverb

Medical Definition

depress

transitive verb
de·​press di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio)
1
: to diminish the activity, strength, or yield of
able to depress irritability of the heart muscle by the use of such a drug as procaine
2
: to lower in spirit or mood

More from Merriam-Webster on depress

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