demise

noun
de·​mise | \di-ˈmīz \

Definition of demise 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : death

b : a cessation of existence or activity

c : a loss of position or status

2 : the conveyance of an estate

3 : transfer of the sovereignty to a successor

demise

verb
demised; demising

Definition of demise (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to convey by will or lease demise an estate

2 : to transmit by succession or inheritance

3 obsolete : convey, give

intransitive verb

1 : die, decease

2 : to pass by descent or bequest the property has demised to the king's heirs

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Synonyms & Antonyms for demise

Synonyms: Noun

death, expiration, expiry, termination

Synonyms: Verb

check out, conk (out), croak [slang], decease, depart, die, drop, end, exit, expire, fall, flatline, go, kick in [slang], kick off [slang], part, pass (on), pass away, peg out [chiefly British], perish, pop off, step out, succumb

Antonyms: Noun

alpha, beginning, birth, commencement, creation, dawn, genesis, inception, incipience, incipiency, launch, morning, onset, outset, start

Antonyms: Verb

breathe, live

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Examples of demise in a Sentence

Noun

… invited visitors to play a game in which points are awarded to those who predict the demise of yet another overhyped dot-com. — Jeff Goodell, Rolling Stone, 14 Sept. 2000 This elegant little book is essential reading for anyone interested in the demise, the terminal silliness, of our culture. — John Irving, New York Times Book Review, 6 Apr. 1997 Like books, board games appear headed for imminent demise at the hands of cathode-ray terminals. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Mar. 1995 She had no property at the time of her demise. The musician met an untimely demise. We have not had truly local news coverage since the town newspaper's demise three years ago. Losing this game will mean the team's demise.

Verb

our much beloved, recently demised leader
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Perri said historical accounts suggest various possibilities for the demise. Karin Brulliard, Washington Post, "America’s first dogs vanished after Europeans arrived, study finds," 7 July 2018 At a minimum, the admission offers a powerful if incomplete explanation for Whitney’s demise. Graham Ambrose, BostonGlobe.com, "Darkness and light in Whitney Houston documentary," 4 July 2018 Despite pressure from certain elements of the base, some Democrats are holding off on advocating for ICE’s demise. Margaret Hartmann, Daily Intelligencer, "Is ‘Abolish ICE’ a Winning Midterm Message for Democrats?," 2 July 2018 Scheuring said farmers aren't rooting for the smelt's demise. Ryan Sabalow And Dale Kasler, sacbee, "These fish are at the heart of California's water debate. But extinction could be close," 1 June 2018 Some locals have blamed the Chinese for the demise of such workshops and for pushing Italians out of work, especially after the global financial crisis in 2008. The Economist, "Tuscan whineLong-term Chinese immigrants in Italy," 17 May 2018 Culturally, many believe that bad choices (whether sugar, carbs, fats or cigarettes) are to blame for an early demise. Rachel Newcomb, chicagotribune.com, "Americans have resolved to live forever or die in the attempt," 8 May 2018 Their apathy-brimming confidence-stripped shells are destined for demise; however, those who prey on their suffering must also be held to account. SI.com, "FanView: Sunderland Have Hit a New Low & it Rests at a Minority of Supporters' Doors," 19 Mar. 2018 This is the most common reason for an indoor bamboo’s demise. Sunset, "How to Grow Bamboo as a Houseplant," 22 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'demise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of demise

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for demise

Noun

Middle English dimise, from Anglo-French demise, feminine of demis, past participle of demettre to dismiss, from Latin demittere to send down, from de- + mittere to send

Verb

see demise entry 1

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Statistics for demise

Last Updated

7 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for demise

The first known use of demise was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for demise

demise

noun

English Language Learners Definition of demise

: an end of life

: the end of something that is thought of as being like a death

demise

noun
de·​mise | \di-ˈmīz \

Kids Definition of demise

1 : death sense 1 And often the court waited until the demise of two or three potters before searching out their replacements.— Linda Sue Park, A Single Shard

2 : an ending of existence or activity the demise of a newspaper

de·​mise | \di-ˈmīz \
demised; demising

Legal Definition of demise 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: to convey (possession of property) by will or lease the demised premises

demise

noun

Legal Definition of demise (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the conveyance of property by will or lease : lease

2 : the transmission of property by testate or intestate succession

3 : charter of a boat in which the owner surrenders completely the possession, command, and navigation of the boat

called also bareboat charter

History and Etymology for demise

Noun

Anglo-French, from feminine past participle of demettre to convey by lease, from Old French, to put down, give up, renounce, from Latin demittere to let fall and dimittere to release

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