current

adjective
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce current (audio) , ˈkə-rənt\

Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a archaic : running, flowing
b(1) : presently elapsing the current year
(2) : occurring in or existing at the present time the current crisis current supplies current needs
(3) : most recent the magazine's current issue the current survey
2 : used as a medium of exchange
3 : generally accepted, used, practiced, or prevalent at the moment current fashions current ideas about education

current

noun

Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the part of a fluid body (such as air or water) moving continuously in a certain direction
b : the swiftest part of a stream
c : a tidal or nontidal movement of lake or ocean water
d : flow marked by force or strength
2a : a tendency or course of events that is usually the result of an interplay of forces currents of public opinion
b : a prevailing mood : strain
3 : a flow of electric charge also : the rate of such flow

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Other Words from current

Adjective

currently adverb
currentness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for current

Synonyms: Adjective

conventional, customary, going, popular, prevailing, prevalent, standard, stock, usual

Synonyms: Noun

direction, drift, leaning, run, tendency, tide, trend, wind

Antonyms: Adjective

nonstandard, unconventional, unpopular, unusual

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Choose the Right Synonym for current

Noun

tendency, trend, drift, tenor, current mean movement in a particular direction. tendency implies an inclination sometimes amounting to an impelling force. a general tendency toward inflation trend applies to the general direction maintained by a winding or irregular course. the long-term trend of the stock market is upward drift may apply to a tendency determined by external forces the drift of the population away from large cities or it may apply to an underlying or obscure trend of meaning or discourse. got the drift of her argument tenor stresses a clearly perceptible direction and a continuous, undeviating course. the tenor of the times current implies a clearly defined but not necessarily unalterable course. an encounter that changed the current of my life

Examples of current in a Sentence

Adjective

The dictionary's current edition has 10,000 new words. Who is your current employer? We need to keep current with the latest information.

Noun

Strong currents pulled the swimmer out to sea. Air currents carried the balloon for miles. The circuit supplies current to the saw.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

For all his nostalgic ties to the work, the actor— and playwright, composer, lyricist, and singer with the Pulitzers, Emmys, Grammys, and Tonys to prove it—articulated the show’s relevance in the current political climate. Ian Malone, Vogue, "Camelot Ruled the Stage at Lincoln Center Theater’s Benefit Gala," 5 Mar. 2019 While early presidents such as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln were relatively safe choices, the current political climate would likely make USS William Jefferson Clinton and USS George W. Bush tough sells. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "The U.S. Navy Is Buying Two Carriers at Once for a Big Discount," 4 Feb. 2019 In some cities, museums are offering free entry to help get people out of the smog; head directly to museum websites, or event aggregator sites like SF Fun Cheap to stay current on the offers of the day. Megan Spurrell, Condé Nast Traveler, "California Fires: What to Know If You're Visiting California This Week," 21 Nov. 2018 The laws undercut the Police Commissioner's current policies—and Frank is certainly not happy with his daughter about that change. Jennifer Aldrich, Country Living, "Next Week's 'Blue Bloods' Shows Erin and Frank Reagan Clash in Most Intense Episode Yet," 9 Nov. 2018 The man who spearheads these tactics for the Enquirer is Dylan Howard, American Media’s chief content officer, according to current and former employees. Lukas I. Alpert, WSJ, "From Bezos to Dr. Phil, the Enquirer Turns to Bare Knuckle Tactics," 15 Feb. 2019 What’s interesting though, is the vast diversity in current Windows 10 development. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Microsoft skips way, way ahead in new Windows 10 build," 14 Feb. 2019 On eBay, for example, the current bid for vintage Tupperware Mini Hourglass salt & pepper shakers is at $26. Maya Mcdowell, House Beautiful, "Your Old Tupperware May Be Worth a Lot More Than You Think," 13 Feb. 2019 Shawn has been pretty open about his current relationship status in recent interviews. Tamara Fuentes, Seventeen, "Everything You Need to Know About Shawn Mendes' Love Life," 11 Feb. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The company expects same-store sales growth to hit 2.5% during its current fiscal year, implying a stronger growth rate in Darden’s current and final quarter. Micah Maidenberg, WSJ, "Darden Says Diners Are Trading Up, Thanks to Strong Labor Market," 18 Dec. 2018 The National Science Foundation project seeks to understand the movement of plankton and fish as a result of currents and eddies. Jennifer Van Grove, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Coast Guard icebreaker stops in San Diego before Arctic mission," 24 June 2018 Peter James, a corporate pilot with 25 years of experience per his Twitter bio, remarked at the plane's pace in astonishment on Twitter: Jet streams are essentially rivers or currents of air that travel west to east across the planet. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Virgin Flight Reaches 801 MPH as Furious Jet Stream Propels Plane Faster Than Speed of Sound," 19 Feb. 2019 The first test was a 400-yard swim — 200 with the current of the Weeki Wachee River, and 200 against. Sarah Scoles, Washington Post, "These ‘mermaids’ dance underwater for half an hour at a time," 17 June 2018 But as the killer’s current confessions show, a much darker current of violence ran beneath his official criminal record. Kyle Swenson, The Seattle Times, "Elderly prisoner claims he’s America’s deadliest serial killer with 90 victims. Police believe him.," 20 Nov. 2018 Clearly, there are strong currents of popular discontent in both countries that conventional polling techniques do not capture fully. Arthur I. Cyr, Lake County News-Sun, "Cyr: Britain’s prime minister takes charge of cabinet," 13 July 2018 The needles can be plain or accompanied with gentle currents of electricity, medication, or burning herbs. Houston Chronicle, "Pet Talk: Could your pet benefit from acupuncture treatment?," 6 July 2018 The solution, mostly effective, has been to think in terms of connection, both to the city which hosts it, and to the deeper currents of history that led to its creation. Philip Kennicott, kansascity, "St. Louis’ Gateway Arch emerges with new name, skeptical view of western expansion," 3 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'current.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of current

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for current

Adjective

Latininization of Middle English corrant, curraunt, borrowed from Anglo-French curant, corant, present participle of coure, courir "to run, flow," going back to Latin currere "to run, roll, move swiftly, flow," going back to Indo-European *kr̥s-e- "run," whence also Greek epíkouros "helping, helper" (from *epíkorsos "running toward," with o-grade ablaut), Old Irish carr "cart, wagon," Welsh car "vehicle" (from Celtic *kr̥s-o-), and perhaps Germanic *hursa- horse entry 1

Note: The Indo-European base has generally been taken as a primary verb, though Latin is the only language in which it is so attested.

Noun

Latinization of Middle English curraunt, borrowed from Middle French courant, going back to Old French, noun derivative from corant, curant, present participle of coure, courir "to run, flow" — more at current entry 1

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Statistics for current

Last Updated

11 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for current

The first known use of current was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for current

current

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or existing now : belonging to or existing in the present time
chiefly US : aware of what is happening in a particular area of activity

current

noun

English Language Learners Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

: a continuous movement of water or air in the same direction
: a flow of electricity
formal : an idea, feeling, opinion, etc., that is shared by many or most of the people in a group

current

adjective
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt How to pronounce current (audio) \

Kids Definition of current

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : now passing the current month
2 : occurring in or belonging to the present time current events
3 : generally and widely accepted, used, or practiced current customs

current

noun

Kids Definition of current (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a body of fluid (as air or water) moving in a specified direction
2 : the swiftest part of a stream
3 : the general course : trend
4 : a flow of electricity

current

noun
cur·​rent | \ ˈkər-ənt, ˈkə-rənt How to pronounce current (audio) \

Medical Definition of current

1 : the part of a fluid body (as air or water) moving continuously in a certain direction
2 : a flow of electric charge also : the rate of such flow

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Comments on current

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