conjoin

verb

con·​join kən-ˈjȯin How to pronounce conjoin (audio)
kän-
conjoined; conjoining; conjoins

transitive verb

: to join together (things, such as separate entities) for a common purpose

intransitive verb

: to join together for a common purpose

Examples of conjoin in a Sentence

The two rivers eventually conjoin. their attempts to conjoin two very different concepts
Recent Examples on the Web This cycle began on October 14, 2023, when the new moon in Libra conjoined with an annular eclipse. Marie Bladt, Glamour, 25 Mar. 2024 Ella and Eliza Fuller were born conjoined at the abdomen at Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women on March 1, 2023, according to a previous news release from the hospital. Abigail Adams, Peoplemag, 18 Mar. 2024 At the tail end of Paris Fashion Week, Balenciaga showed off a pair of skinny jeans with bleached creases cascading down the thigh that were conjoined with over-the-knee black stiletto boots. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, 14 Mar. 2024 They had been conjoined in a single bill after Republicans vowed to block funding for Ukraine unless Biden did something about immigration. Evan Osnos, The New Yorker, 4 Mar. 2024 The sun, Mercury, and Saturn conjoin to sort out the chaos. Read the full Aquarius Daily Horoscope This horoscope was generated automatically using information from Sanctuary. USA TODAY, 28 Feb. 2024 Moments later, they were told their daughters were conjoined. Wendy Grossman Kantor, Peoplemag, 28 Feb. 2024 The Moon is conjoining pleasure-loving Venus in your 9th House of Journeys, bringing you wonderful experiences from around the globe. Tarot Astrologers, Chicago Tribune, 11 Sep. 2023 Prepare for an influx of creativity when the sun, Mercury, and Saturn conjoin. USA TODAY, 28 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'conjoin.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French conjoindre, from Latin conjungere, from com- + jungere to join — more at yoke

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Time Traveler
The first known use of conjoin was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near conjoin

Cite this Entry

“Conjoin.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conjoin. Accessed 13 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

conjoin

verb
con·​join kən-ˈjȯin How to pronounce conjoin (audio)
kän-
: to join together for a common purpose

More from Merriam-Webster on conjoin

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