concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
b : combine, blend
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt\

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did You Know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective

It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results.

Verb

the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The room will become the new mechanical room, and scaffolding is being set up for installing the concrete masonry unit wall for the room. Alec Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Oconomowoc's new Meadow View Elementary is nearing completion ahead of the new school year," 28 June 2019 On Saturday, a contractor told ABC News that Ajayi sought him out a few months ago to build a soundproof room in his home with hooks drilled into concrete walls and a secret entrance with a thumb lock. Olivia Sanchez, USA TODAY, "Police continue to track digital evidence after arrest in the death of student Mackenzie Lueck," 28 June 2019 Once the concrete wall has been repaired and primed, Walling will begin her work. courant.com, "Community News For The Hebron Edition," 13 June 2019 Some survivors said that their memories of hurt and healing were still bound up in Columbine’s concrete walls, and that the school should be preserved. New York Times, "Columbine High School Could Be Torn Down to Deter Copycats," 7 June 2019 Charles Hungerford dug and poured the footings and made the concrete wall that holds the tiles. Mary Schneidau Sullivan, baltimoresun.com, "Laurel Arts Council creates projects people can live with," 7 June 2019 And when the door finally opened, the techno was all-encompassing, ricocheting off the concrete walls. Elise Taylor, Vogue, "The Prada Resort After-Party Was Pretty, Pink, and Thumping," 3 May 2019 Two journalists were also injured, police cars were vandalized and a concrete wall was torn down, the statement said. Madeline Holcombe, CNN, "Chaos erupts after an officer-involved shooting leaves a man dead in Memphis," 13 June 2019 The sale has drawn some criticism from a developer building a hotel next door who says the commissioners have invested money without a concrete plan or dedicated funding to make their vision happen. oregonlive.com, "Multnomah County hopes to create alternative to jail, ERs for mentally ill homeless people," 10 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Washington Post, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The project was delayed for two to three days because the top level of concrete was slightly off on the required grade for ADA compliance. Erika Butler, baltimoresun.com, "Office Street entrance to Harford courthouse reopens; Courtland side closed until September," 2 July 2019 The scuttling occurred a little more than a week ago off the Treasure Coast, where a flotilla of pleasure boaters surrounded a spectacle made possible by a small mountain of concrete that Orlando Utilities Commission had to dump somewhere. Kevin Spear, orlandosentinel.com, "Orlando utility donates 200 tons of concrete to help sink cocaine ship," 2 July 2019 The concrete, juxtaposed with traditional red brick, was bright and clean, suggesting a public facility of importance — something monumental. Anthony Flint, BostonGlobe.com, "Learning to love the world’s ugliest building," 1 July 2019 One-block segments on College Avenue will be closed for up to two hours each as the final layer of concrete is poured on station platforms. Kellie Hwang, Indianapolis Star, "Plan ahead: These interstates and streets will be closed this weekend," 21 June 2019 No injuries were reported, but chunks of concrete blew onto lanes on both sides of the highway. Sarah Brookbank And Jennifer Edwards Baker, Cincinnati.com, "Update: Some lanes open after crash closes SB I-75 at I-275," 17 June 2019 The concrete had previously been 4 feet below the top, Wade said. Peter Fimrite, SFChronicle.com, "Moccasin Dam, which came close to failure last year, is repaired and working," 10 June 2019 The concrete is clearly not natural, but its rhythms and textures are read as an abstract version of a rock formation. Adrian Higgins, Washington Post, "This unusual garden style could be a sustainable solution for urban landscapes," 5 June 2019 Concrete Pros: Versatile, practical, chic, and modern when well designed, concrete is a surprisingly good deck material option. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "How to Choose the Best Deck Material for Your House," 22 May 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

3 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for concrete

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: made of concrete
: relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities

concrete

verb

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

British : to cover or form (something) with concrete

concrete

noun

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

: a hard, strong material that is used for building and made by mixing cement, sand, and broken rocks with water

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

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Comments on concrete

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