concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
b : combine, blend
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt\

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did You Know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective

It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results.

Verb

the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

At present, Initiative Q is exactly what its name suggests, more of an idea than anything concrete, because the currency doesn’t exist in any official capacity. Nadra Nittle, Vox, "This new would-be currency isn’t crypto — but is it for real?," 8 Nov. 2018 The warehouse was built on a concrete foundation and had a wooden structure with aluminum siding, Spalding said. Bailey Loosemore, The Courier-Journal, "Thousands of bourbon barrels spill from collapsed Barton 1792 warehouse," 22 June 2018 Your damage was concrete, stripped of titles, degrees, enrollment. Meagan Flynn, Washington Post, "Voters remove judge who sentenced Brock Turner to six months in Stanford sexual assault case," 6 June 2018 Your damage was concrete, stripped of titles, degrees, enrollment. Author: Meagan Flynn, Anchorage Daily News, "Voters remove California judge who sentenced Brock Turner to 6 months for Stanford sexual assault," 6 June 2018 Concrete Foundation Testing Guidelines AREA — The town of Coventry has been awarded funding for the purpose of providing core testing on concrete foundations throughout the towns of Coventry, Ashford, Tolland, Willington, Columbia, Bolton and Union. Courant Community, "Community News For The Manchester Edition," 29 May 2018 These blocks can be made of granite Belgian block cobbles or a prefabricated concrete aggregate block. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "The Easy Landscape Design That'll Make Your Driveway 10 Times More Attractive," 19 Apr. 2019 Still, Lancaster fell in love with the building: with its wood truss ceilings and giant windows; the concrete nameplate emblazoned with the words Engine Co. No. Christina Pérez, Vogue, "Why L.A.’s Arts District Is the New Place to Stay," 11 Apr. 2019 In it, Good Charlotte performs along a concrete river bank that runs through Los Angeles. Jasmine Gomez, Seventeen, "Everything You Need to Know About Makeup Guru Jeffree Star," 9 Apr. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Washington Post, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Then there is this current concrete and steel condominium offering the present-day opportunity to live here. Gridiron Condominiums, The Seattle Times, "Pioneer Square condos host waterfront revival talk," 29 Mar. 2019 Another material having a serious renaissance at the moment is concrete, which counts designer and Restored by the Fords host Leanne Ford as a devotee. Emma Bazilian, House Beautiful, "Everything You Need to Know About Textured Wall Finishes," 7 Feb. 2019 The Pantheon's circular dome has a single concrete shell. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Italy’s famous dome is cracking, and cosmic rays could help save it," 21 Aug. 2018 Outside, a saltwater pool sits between a grassy yard and a polished concrete patio. Jack Flemming, latimes.com, "MedMen co-founder Andrew Modlin hashes out deal for modern home in WeHo," 10 July 2018 In the little town of Mokokchung, the flags of Argentina, Brazil, Germany and Spain fly above concrete homes. Yirmiyan Arthur, Fox News, "In cricket-mad India, 1 distant corner is crazy for soccer," 29 June 2018 The floors are polished concrete with bits of the hotel's original hexagon tile floors peeking through. Sarah Gish, kansascity, "No vacancy: This historic downtown KC hotel has 'micro' apartments for $525 a month," 14 June 2018 Floors are polished concrete and the walls are white, allowing for the ultimate in squeaky-clean, minimalist living. Lauren Ro, Curbed, "Nab this Donald Wexler midcentury pad in Palm Springs for $725K," 29 May 2018 But there is one new concrete and devastating detail. Heather Knight, San Francisco Chronicle, "Alice’s life on the sidewalk ends with a dignified death," 27 Feb. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

8 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for concrete

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: made of concrete
: relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities

concrete

verb

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

British : to cover or form (something) with concrete

concrete

noun

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

: a hard, strong material that is used for building and made by mixing cement, sand, and broken rocks with water

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

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Comments on concrete

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