concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
b : combine, blend
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt\

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did You Know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective

It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results.

Verb

the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

These blocks can be made of granite Belgian block cobbles or a prefabricated concrete aggregate block. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "The Easy Landscape Design That'll Make Your Driveway 10 Times More Attractive," 19 Apr. 2019 Still, Lancaster fell in love with the building: with its wood truss ceilings and giant windows; the concrete nameplate emblazoned with the words Engine Co. No. Christina Pérez, Vogue, "Why L.A.’s Arts District Is the New Place to Stay," 11 Apr. 2019 In it, Good Charlotte performs along a concrete river bank that runs through Los Angeles. Jasmine Gomez, Seventeen, "Everything You Need to Know About Makeup Guru Jeffree Star," 9 Apr. 2019 But, sadly, there’s nothing concrete to suggest that will happen—yet. Megan Stein, Country Living, "A 'JAG' Reunion Is Coming to 'NCIS: LA' and We Are Losing It," 7 Apr. 2019 Try Caesarstone’s concrete options for a matte finish minus the fuss. The Good Housekeeping Institute, Good Housekeeping, "GH Seal Spotlight: Caesarstone Countertops," 5 Apr. 2019 Many lots are barren, save for concrete slabs where houses once stood. Arian Campo-flores, WSJ, "Flattened by Hurricane Michael, Florida Town Tries to Stave Off Big Development," 3 Apr. 2019 And not just due to its questionable ethics or lack of concrete data — but because of critical information that has been left out of the narrative. Julia Belluz, Vox, "7 bad science and health ideas that should die with 2018," 26 Dec. 2018 On February 17, 2017, a crack opened up along the Dam's spillway, a 3,000-foot-long concrete chute meant to guide water into the river. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "The Oroville Dam Almost Flooded Northern California. Now It's Working Again.," 3 Apr. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Washington Post, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Floor Materials The floor of a greenhouse can be made of any number of materials, including gravel, wood decking, flagstone, metal grates, poured concrete, or just bare dirt. Joseph Truini, Popular Mechanics, "How to Build a Greenhouse," 28 Jan. 2019 For a room addition or deck, trenches or holes are dug, then the footings or foundations are added by pouring concrete. Brett Martin, House Beautiful, "How Long It Takes To Renovate Every Single Room In Your House," 26 Dec. 2018 The floor is poured concrete, the ceiling is reclaimed longleaf pine, and the print is by Jonah Freeman, Justin Lowe, and Alexandre Singh. Rima Suqi, ELLE Decor, "How an Abandoned Texas Home Is Restored Into an Ethereal Country Getaway," 20 Sep. 2018 In larger cities, there might be one company that does civil contracting, while another pours concrete and a third does gravel. Anchorage Daily News, "Constructing success with the Drake family," 25 June 2018 Inspectors watched as Iran poured concrete into its partially completed nuclear reactor at Arak, bending to international concerns that the facility could become a future source of plutonium for nuclear bombs. Joby Warrick, Washington Post, "Muzzled watchdog: How killing the nuclear deal could make it easier for Iran to pursue the bomb in secret," 8 May 2018 Stephane Phifer, director of Sustainability and Urban Planning for the city, said years ago, it was decided to pour concrete and rebar around the root systems of the trees. Steve Lord, Aurora Beacon-News, "Aurora starts Water Street Mall renovations with tree removals," 14 Apr. 2018 Beyond blocks, almost any flame-resistant material will do: stones, bricks, poured concrete, pavers or any creative combination thereof. Debbie Swanson, USA TODAY, "Spice up your backyard with a cool DIY fire pit," 1 Apr. 2018 The first, a 1,500-square-foot main house with loft-like elements, would feature a massive fishing workshop and floors of gray poured concrete. Chantal Lamers, Sunset, "How to Design a Pair of Family Cabins," 22 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

24 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for concrete

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: made of concrete
: relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities

concrete

verb

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

British : to cover or form (something) with concrete

concrete

noun

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

: a hard, strong material that is used for building and made by mixing cement, sand, and broken rocks with water

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

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Comments on concrete

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