concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , ˈkän-ˌkrēt, kən-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : naming a real thing or class of things the word poem is concrete, poetry is abstract
2 : formed by coalition of particles into one solid mass
3a : characterized by or belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events
b : specific, particular a concrete proposal
c : real, tangible concrete evidence
4 : relating to or made of concrete a concrete wall

concrete

verb
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \
concreted; concreting

Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to form into a solid mass : solidify
2 : to make actual or real : cause to take on the qualities of reality
3 : to cover with, form of, or set in concrete The statues were concreted to the ground.

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) , (ˌ)kän-ˈkrēt \

Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a mass formed by concretion or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body
2 : a hard strong building material made by mixing a cementing material (such as portland cement) and a mineral aggregate (such as sand and gravel) with sufficient water to cause the cement to set and bind the entire mass
3 : a waxy essence of flowers prepared by extraction and evaporation and used in perfumery

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Other Words from concrete

Adjective

concretely adverb
concreteness noun

Did You Know?

Adjective

We can trace "concrete" back to the Latin verb concrescere, meaning "to grow together." Appropriately, when if first entered English "concrete" could mean "connected by growth." Logicians and grammarians also applied "concrete" to words that expressed a quality viewed as being united with the thing it describes. That in turn led to the sense of "concrete" which we now contrast with "abstract" - concrete words express actual things ("rock," "lizard, "harpsichord"), while abstract words express qualities apart from actual things ("bliss," "freedom," "turpitude"). It was not until the 19th century that the noun "concrete," and its related adjective, began to be used for the building material composed of cementing material and sand, gravel, or similar materials.

Examples of concrete in a Sentence

Adjective It's helpful to have concrete examples of how words are used in context. We hope the meetings will produce concrete results. Verb the mortar slowly concreted in the mold a choral work that concretes music and dance into a stunning theatrical experience
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Like one quarantine day, one circle around the block amounts to a concrete unit that can nonetheless be prolonged indefinitely. Jane Hu, New York Times, "The Joy of Circling the Block," 18 May 2020 Ground for the new multi-purpose steel-and-concrete facility was broken on the north bank of the Ohio River, in the east shadow of the John Roebling Suspension Bridge, on Feb. 1, 1988. Mark Schmetzer, Cincinnati.com, "Rockin' the Riverfront: It was a bumpy road en route to Riverfront Stadium construction," 16 May 2020 Restaurant owners in Milan protested in front of the main train station Saturday, saying that the rules remain unclear and that the entire sector needs more concrete help, including an abolition of taxes. USA TODAY, "Italy seeks to boost tourism by opening regional and international borders June 3," 16 May 2020 For now, local roads across the Dutch-Belgian border a short drive from Baarle remain barricaded with concrete blocks. Mick Krever, CNN, "In a town of two nations, Belgian bars are shuttered. Dutch pubs will soon be open across the street," 15 May 2020 The shadow play of the concrete sunscreen of 3525 Turtle Creek. Mark Lamster, Dallas News, "100 reasons to love Dallas right now: A critic’s list of the places that make the city and its architecture special.," 15 May 2020 Hoeppner said the concrete pad of the structure is about 5,300 square feet. Evan Frank, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The town of Delafield will consider permanently closing a longtime skate park," 14 May 2020 Lush, slanting trees drape a concrete tongue of Georgia road as a vehicle slowly motors along. Jason Parham, Wired, "The Video Lynching of Ahmaud Arbery," 12 May 2020 Also, contractors had run into problems with underground wiring and pipes at the site and delayed pouring concrete because of the region’s cold winters. Desperation Town, ProPublica, "Why a Struggling Rust Belt City Pinned Its Revival on a Self-Chilling Beverage Can," 11 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That is, if the information gathered by investigators leads to concrete results within the church and the criminal justice system. Washington Post, "AP Explains: Vatican to send abuse investigators to Mexico," 5 Mar. 2020 The location will also serve local brews and frozen custard concretes with mix-ins by Chicago bakeries like Hot Chocolate Bakery and Bang Bang Pie. Grace Wong, chicagotribune.com, "Hemingway-inspired Spanish tapas restaurant opens in Logan Square, plus more Chicago restaurant news," 17 Oct. 2019 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Elena Becatoros, The Seattle Times, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Small fish peer out from the necks of the jugs, which the passage of time has concreted into the seabed. Washington Post, "Wrecks, sunken treasures lie under Albania’s coastal waters," 2 Aug. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The company said the project team has worked a total of 429,000 hours and poured 18,000 cubic yards of concrete. William Thornton | Wthornton@al.com, al, "Robins & Morton marks milestone on $256 million Florida project," 15 May 2020 Pro tip: Wear gloves; the concrete can be rough on skin. Washington Post, "Try these hacks using mulch, basketballs, couch cushions and more to boost your home workout," 30 Apr. 2020 The bunkerlike concrete building is crumbling from within. Michael Schwirtz, New York Times, "One Rich N.Y. Hospital Got Warren Buffett’s Help. This One Got Duct Tape.," 26 Apr. 2020 The backyard features a large covered patio, grilling area, stamped concrete decking and pool and stone-surround spa. Dallas News, "Lesa Stuart showcases Shaddock home in Murphy," 25 Apr. 2020 Beneath the memorial’s canopy, eight bronze busts sit on square concrete podiums. Timothy Mclaughlin, The Atlantic, "A Glimpse of the Coronavirus’s Possible Legacy," 18 Mar. 2020 The mains, which are constructed of iron or high-pressure concrete, sit about six feet under the streets, according to the site. Rory Linnane, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Water main break floods area near Hawley Road south of I-94," 28 Dec. 2019 Turner spokesperson Pat Crowley confirmed that about 25 workers are on site Saturday for the first concrete pour since the tragedy occurred on Nov. 25. Madeline Mitchell, Cincinnati.com, "Construction continues with first concrete pour since worker killed in downtown building collapse," 21 Dec. 2019 Geelong’s bridges, by contrast, will be made with geopolymer concrete. The Economist, "A pair of Australian bridges try to cure concrete cancer," 2 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concrete.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concrete

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concrete

Adjective

Middle English concret "(of words) denoting a quality as adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," borrowed from Medieval Latin concrētus "composite, solidified, (of words) denoting a quality adherent in a substance rather than in isolation," going back to Latin, "formed, composite, condensed, solid," from past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Verb

borrowed from Latin concrētus, past participle of concrēscere "to coalesce, condense, solidify, harden" — more at concrescence

Noun

derivative of concrete entry 1

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Time Traveler for concrete

Time Traveler

The first known use of concrete was in the 14th century

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Statistics for concrete

Last Updated

21 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Concrete.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concrete. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for concrete

concrete

adjective
How to pronounce concrete (audio) How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: made of concrete
: relating to or involving specific people, things, or actions rather than general ideas or qualities

concrete

verb
How to pronounce concrete (audio) How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 3)

British : to cover or form (something) with concrete

concrete

noun
How to pronounce concrete (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of concrete (Entry 3 of 3)

: a hard, strong material that is used for building and made by mixing cement, sand, and broken rocks with water

concrete

adjective
con·​crete | \ kän-ˈkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made of or relating to concrete
2 : being specific and useful a concrete example
3 : being real and useful concrete evidence

concrete

noun
con·​crete | \ ˈkän-ˌkrēt How to pronounce concrete (audio) \

Kids Definition of concrete (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hardened mixture of cement, sand, and water with gravel or broken stone used in construction

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