broadsheet

noun
broad·​sheet | \ ˈbrȯd-ˌshēt How to pronounce broadsheet (audio) \

Definition of broadsheet

2 chiefly British : a newspaper with pages of a size larger than those of a tabloid

Examples of broadsheet in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web While tabloids and broadsheets that tend to be loyal to one party such as The Sun (Conservatives) and the Daily Mirror (Labour) are expected to deliver the usual endorsements, others are issuing blistering editorials assailing both major parties. Hadas Gold, CNN, "UK media outlets can't find candidates worth endorsing in crucial election," 6 Dec. 2019 The project, led by Ms. Hannah-Jones, included a broadsheet section and a podcast. Marc Tracy, New York Times, "The New York Times, Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica Win Pulitzers," 4 May 2020 The pool includes broadcasters like the BBC and broadsheet papers like The Times of London, but the tabloids, with their huge circulations and ravenous interest in the royal family, are key members. Mark Landler, New York Times, "Harry and Meghan Cut Off U.K. Tabloids," 20 Apr. 2020 There would be the broadsheets of all the newspapers on the table every day. Kristen Baldwin, EW.com, "The ultimate Succession interview: Jeremy Strong, Sarah Snook, and Kieran Culkin talk to each other about stuff," 11 Dec. 2019 Hughes, 59, is an African American resident of the East Side who publishes a free weekly broadsheet called the San Antonio Herald News. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Trump supporters stand by their man: ‘He’s a pompous, arrogant jerk,’ says one. ‘But that’s what we need now.’," 11 Oct. 2019 Mr Buchsteiner is another veteran London correspondent, for the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Germany’s leading conservative broadsheet. The Economist, "In praise of British exceptionalism," 26 Sep. 2019 The broadsheet started publishing as a tabloid this week for the want of newsprint. Mary Beth Sheridan, Washington Post, "Nicaragua’s Ortega is strangling La Prensa, one of Latin America’s most storied newspapers," 4 Aug. 2019 In all, Weinman kept more than 2,000 yellow, brittle broadsheets, immortalizing events that changed the world. CBS News, "Former paperboy gives away decades of historic headlines," 2 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'broadsheet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of broadsheet

1665, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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The first known use of broadsheet was in 1665

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Cite this Entry

“Broadsheet.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/broadsheet. Accessed 11 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for broadsheet

broadsheet

noun

English Language Learners Definition of broadsheet

chiefly British : a newspaper that has large pages and that usually deals with serious subjects

More from Merriam-Webster on broadsheet

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about broadsheet

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