communicate

verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Definition of communicate

transitive verb

1a : to convey knowledge of or information about : make known communicate a story She communicated her ideas to the group.
b : to reveal by clear signs His fear communicated itself to his friends. He communicated his dissatisfaction to the staff.
2 : to cause to pass from one to another Some diseases are easily communicated.
3 archaic : share

intransitive verb

1 : to transmit information, thought, or feeling so that it is satisfactorily received or understood two sides failing to communicate with each other The computer communicates with peripheral equipment.
2 : to open into each other : connect The rooms communicate.
3 : to receive Communion Some Christians communicate in both elements, bread and wine.

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from communicate

communicatee \ kə-​ˌmyü-​ni-​kə-​ˈtē How to pronounce communicatee (audio) \ noun

Examples of communicate in a Sentence

He was asked to communicate the news to the rest of the people. She communicated her ideas to the group. The two computers are able to communicate directly with one another. The pilot communicated with the airport just before the crash. The couple has trouble communicating. the challenge of getting the two groups to communicate with each other We communicate a lot of information through body language. He communicated his dissatisfaction to the staff. If you're excited about the product, your enthusiasm will communicate itself to customers. The disease is communicated through saliva.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

In addition to Rent Manager, LCS also offers NDT Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone solutions, which allow companies to easily communicate with customers, prospects, vendors and remote employees. Jessica Levy, Cincinnati.com, "For local employment opportunities, top tech professionals choose LCS," 7 June 2019 The move is significant since 5G is expected to usher in an era of smart cities by allowing connected devices to more quickly communicate with each other. Alyssa Newcomb, Fortune, "Huawei Strikes a 5G Deal in Russia as the Chinese Tech Giant Remains on U.S. Blacklist," 6 June 2019 Participants learn skills that can help practice self-care, set boundaries and learn strategies to communicate with loved ones struggling with an addiction. courant.com, "Community News For The Hebron Edition," 6 June 2019 Of course, an audience—or a country to run, or a business to lead—is a conduit to communicate your ideas. Cassie Werber, Quartz at Work, "Theresa May’s final days in office are a lesson in learning from failure," 5 June 2019 Jackson, who once loved babbling and singing and calling for the family dog, had stopped communicating, other than to hold his head in his tiny hands and cry, his mother said. The Washington Post, The Mercury News, "A tick gave a toddler a rare and deadly disease. Here’s what his parents want you to know.," 4 June 2019 Jackson, who once loved babbling and singing and calling for the family dog, had stopped communicating, other than to hold his head in his tiny hands and cry, his mother said. al.com, "What is Rocky Mountain spotted fever? Ticks spread rare, deadly disease," 3 June 2019 Michael Levin at Tufts University was among the earliest to wonder if a cell’s inability to communicate normally with the body’s patterning networks was also relevant to the behavior of cancer. Sally Adee, Quartz, "Our bodies are full of electricity that could help us fight cancer," 30 May 2019 Make sure to communicate beforehand about both of your desires, expectations, and fears. Sophie Saint Thomas, Allure, "A Guide to Pegging Your Partner With a Strap On," 8 May 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'communicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of communicate

1529, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for communicate

Latin communicatus, past participle of communicare to impart, participate, from communis common — more at mean

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about communicate

Statistics for communicate

Last Updated

16 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for communicate

The first known use of communicate was in 1529

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for communicate

communicate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of communicate

: to give information about (something) to someone by speaking, writing, moving your hands, etc.
: to get someone to understand your thoughts or feelings
medical : to pass (a disease) from one person or animal to another

communicate

verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Kids Definition of communicate

1 : to get in touch “… we won't be able to communicate. The mail is unpredictable …”— Pam Muñoz Ryan, Esperanza Rising
2 : to make known I communicated my needs to the nurse.
3 : to pass (as a disease) from one to another : spread

communicate

transitive verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Medical Definition of communicate

: to cause to pass from one to another some diseases are easily communicated

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on communicate

What made you want to look up communicate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

showing great care, attention, and effort

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Finance Words Quiz

  • a-piggy-bank
  • The etymology of mortgage is related most closely to which two words?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!