communicate

verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Definition of communicate

transitive verb

1a : to convey knowledge of or information about : make known communicate a story She communicated her ideas to the group.
b : to reveal by clear signs His fear communicated itself to his friends. He communicated his dissatisfaction to the staff.
2 : to cause to pass from one to another Some diseases are easily communicated.
3 archaic : share

intransitive verb

1 : to transmit information, thought, or feeling so that it is satisfactorily received or understood two sides failing to communicate with each other The computer communicates with peripheral equipment.
2 : to open into each other : connect The rooms communicate.
3 : to receive Communion Some Christians communicate in both elements, bread and wine.

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Other Words from communicate

communicatee \ kə-​ˌmyü-​ni-​kə-​ˈtē How to pronounce communicatee (audio) \ noun

Examples of communicate in a Sentence

He was asked to communicate the news to the rest of the people. She communicated her ideas to the group. The two computers are able to communicate directly with one another. The pilot communicated with the airport just before the crash. The couple has trouble communicating. the challenge of getting the two groups to communicate with each other We communicate a lot of information through body language. He communicated his dissatisfaction to the staff. If you're excited about the product, your enthusiasm will communicate itself to customers. The disease is communicated through saliva.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Responding to emails or messages, processing orders or returns, communicating about products/services with clients, etc. Jamie Ballard, Woman's Day, "How to Become a Virtual Assistant So You Can Work From Home," 7 May 2019 Her client is also a visual artist and has spent time in Morocco, both of which are strongly communicated in the interiors, from the fearless use of shape, color, and texture to the Moroccan accents. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "Almost Everything in This Colorful Family Home is Vintage," 3 May 2019 The course’s mission is to instill in future business leaders the self-awareness to build more effective relationships and communicate more openly... Kelsey Gee, WSJ, "Stanford Pushes Executives to Get ‘Touchy Feely’," 1 May 2019 Also, his administration announced a ban on cell phones for the next academic year, which would prevent students from communicating directly with their guardians in emergencies. Indygo Arscott, Teen Vogue, "Ontario Students Hold Walkouts in Protest of Progressive Conservative Party's Policy Proposals," 4 Apr. 2019 For instance, one participant relied on Facebook to communicate with their boss about their weekly work schedule. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Economists calculate the true value of Facebook to its users in new study," 27 Dec. 2018 The women smear their bodies with paint, the men count their wealth in cattle, and the tribe communicate with the souls of ancestors through the smoke of holy fires. Stanley Stewart, Condé Nast Traveler, "Going Off-Grid in Namibia," 21 Dec. 2018 Less than a week before Trump’s sit down with Putin, Stoltenberg advocated communicating with Russia. Tessa Berenson / Brussels, Time, "Russia Casts Shadow Over President Trump's NATO Meetings," 11 July 2018 The terrorist leader, who communicates with the attackers via cellphone and is never seen, directs them to seek out the rich and execute them in as public a manner as possible. Soren Andersen, The Seattle Times, "‘Hotel Mumbai’ review: a horrifying tale of 2008 terrorist attack," 26 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'communicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of communicate

1529, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for communicate

Latin communicatus, past participle of communicare to impart, participate, from communis common — more at mean

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Learn More about communicate

Statistics for communicate

Last Updated

19 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for communicate

The first known use of communicate was in 1529

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More Definitions for communicate

communicate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of communicate

: to give information about (something) to someone by speaking, writing, moving your hands, etc.
: to get someone to understand your thoughts or feelings
medical : to pass (a disease) from one person or animal to another

communicate

verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Kids Definition of communicate

1 : to get in touch “… we won't be able to communicate. The mail is unpredictable …”— Pam Muñoz Ryan, Esperanza Rising
2 : to make known I communicated my needs to the nurse.
3 : to pass (as a disease) from one to another : spread

communicate

transitive verb
com·​mu·​ni·​cate | \ kə-ˈmyü-nə-ˌkāt How to pronounce communicate (audio) \
communicated; communicating

Medical Definition of communicate

: to cause to pass from one to another some diseases are easily communicated

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Comments on communicate

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