collaborate

verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Definition of collaborate

intransitive verb

1 : to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor An international team of scientists collaborated on the study.
2 : to cooperate with or willingly assist an enemy of one's country and especially an occupying force suspected of collaborating with the enemy
3 : to cooperate with an agency or instrumentality with which one is not immediately connected The two schools collaborate on library services.

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Other Words from collaborate

collaboration \ kə-​ˌla-​bə-​ˈrā-​shən How to pronounce collaboration (audio) \ noun
collaborative \ kə-​ˈla-​bə-​ˌrā-​tiv , -​b(ə-​)rə-​ How to pronounce collaborative (audio) \ adjective or noun
collaboratively \ kə-​ˈla-​bə-​ˌrā-​tiv-​lē How to pronounce collaboratively (audio) , -​b(ə-​)rə-​ \ adverb

Did You Know?

The Latin prefix com-, meaning "with, together, or jointly," is a bit of a chameleon - it has a tricky habit of changing its appearance depending on what it's next to. If the word it precedes begins with "l," "com-" becomes "col-." In the case of collaborate, com- teamed up with laborare ("to labor") to form Late Latin collaborare ("to labor together"). Colleague, collect, and collide are a few more examples of the "com-" to "col-" transformation. Other descendants of laborare in English include elaborate,- _laboratory, and labor itself.

Examples of collaborate in a Sentence

The two companies agreed to collaborate. He was suspected of collaborating with the occupying army.
Recent Examples on the Web The Energy Department signed a memorandum of understanding on Monday with the chemical industry's trade group that enables them to collaborate a number of projects. Josh Siegel, Washington Examiner, "Energy Department partners with chemical group to keep plastic waste out of oceans," 3 Feb. 2020 In other words, if a talented, successful artist knows you by name and wants to collaborate with or mentor or just hang out with you, passing up the opportunity could hurt your career prospects. Ashley Fetters, The Atlantic, "Classical Music Has a ‘God Status’ Problem," 31 Jan. 2020 After their bioprinter fell victim to an October 2018 spacecraft crash, 3D Bioprinting Solutions rebounded; the team now collaborates with US and Israeli researchers at the ISS. Molly Glick, Popular Science, "Space might be the perfect place to grow human organs," 30 Jan. 2020 High-end, semicustom 1911 manufacturer Nighthawk, has seen the future and teamed up with one of the more notable custom Glock shops, Agency Arms, to collaborate on a pistol. John B. Snow, Outdoor Life, "Best Guns of the Decade," 2 Jan. 2020 Those who only speak English may also be limited and less inclined to collaborate with others around the world to address global issues. Kathleen Stein-smith, The Conversation, "7 reasons to learn a foreign language," 17 Dec. 2019 Thibault acted at the direction of Gov. Ron DeSantis, who ordered the agency last month to collaborate with local and federal officials to identify measures that have been studied and tested but not implemented before. David Lyons, sun-sentinel.com, "Florida commits $60 million in bid to curb railroad crossing deaths," 5 Dec. 2019 Cowan observed that in the preindustrial rural kitchens of the United States, men and women were forced to collaborate to prepare food. Ben Huberman, Longreads, "“Labor-Saving” Kitchen Gadgets End Up Creating More Work for Women," 3 Nov. 2019 Although the bar does not have a brewing system, Higher Gravity regularly collaborates with local breweries. Briana Rice, Cincinnati.com, "Northside's Higher Gravity is heading to a Cincinnati suburb, bringing 400 beer selections and a beer cave," 24 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'collaborate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of collaborate

1871, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for collaborate

Late Latin collaboratus, past participle of collaborare to labor together, from Latin com- + laborare to labor — more at labor

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Time Traveler for collaborate

Time Traveler

The first known use of collaborate was in 1871

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Statistics for collaborate

Last Updated

15 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Collaborate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/collaborate. Accessed 28 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for collaborate

collaborate

verb
How to pronounce collaborate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of collaborate

: to work with another person or group in order to achieve or do something
disapproving : to give help to an enemy who has invaded your country during a war

collaborate

verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Kids Definition of collaborate

1 : to work with others (as in writing a book)
2 : to cooperate with an enemy force that has taken over a person's country

collaborate

intransitive verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Legal Definition of collaborate

: to work jointly with others in some endeavor

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Comments on collaborate

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