coalesce

verb
co·​a·​lesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Definition of coalesce

intransitive verb

1 : to grow together The edges of the wound coalesced.
2a : to unite into a whole : fuse separate townships have coalesced into a single, sprawling colony— Donald Gould
b : to unite for a common end : join forces people with different points of view coalesce into opposing factions— I. L. Horowitz
3 : to arise from the combination of distinct elements an organized and a popular resistance immediately coalesced— C. C. Menges

transitive verb

: to cause to unite sometimes a book coalesces a public into a mass market— Walter Meade

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Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun
coalescent \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊnt How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for coalesce

mix, mingle, commingle, blend, merge, coalesce, amalgamate, fuse mean to combine into a more or less uniform whole. mix may or may not imply loss of each element's identity. mix the salad greens mix a drink mingle usually suggests that the elements are still somewhat distinguishable or separately active. fear mingled with anticipation in my mind commingle implies a closer or more thorough mingling. a sense of duty commingled with a fierce pride drove her blend implies that the elements as such disappear in the resulting mixture. blended several teas to create a balanced flavor merge suggests a combining in which one or more elements are lost in the whole. in his mind reality and fantasy merged coalesce implies an affinity in the merging elements and usually a resulting organic unity. telling details that coalesce into a striking portrait amalgamate implies the forming of a close union without complete loss of individual identities. refugees who were readily amalgamated into the community fuse stresses oneness and indissolubility of the resulting product. a building in which modernism and classicism are fused

Did You Know?

Coalesce unites the prefix co- ("together") and the Latin verb alescere, meaning "to grow." (The words "adolescent" and "adult" also grew from "alescere.") "Coalesce," which first appeared in English in the mid-17th century, is one of a number of verbs in English (along with "mix," "commingle," "merge," and "amalgamate") that refer to the act of combining parts into a whole. In particular, "coalesce" usually implies the merging of similar parts to form a cohesive unit.

Examples of coalesce in a Sentence

a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time.
Recent Examples on the Web Society is riven with divisions, so a consensus won't coalesce quickly. John Rash, Star Tribune, "Minnesota should be America's 'Nordic model' on press freedom," 23 Apr. 2021 The arts festival will coalesce with over 300 free pop-up events from now through Labor Day, converting the parks, museums, and subway platforms of all five boroughs into temporary stages. Keaton Bell, Vogue, "In-Person Performances Are (Safely, Slowly) Back—14 Events Not to Miss this Spring and Summer," 5 Apr. 2021 All of these gasses will eventually coalesce into tighter and tighter clumps. Mike Wehner, BGR, "This Hubble image is so incredible you’ll swear it’s fake," 2 Apr. 2021 Republicans have struggled to coalesce around a specific critique of the plan, beyond condemning it as ultraprogressive, a charge that Democrats were happy to accept. Emily Cochrane, New York Times, "Congress Clears $1.9 Trillion Aid Bill, Sending It to Biden," 10 Mar. 2021 Holmes also said that as the Biden administration rolled out new policies like a nearly $2 trillion relief bill, Republicans would coalesce in opposition and develop new fundraising constituencies. Maggie Haberman, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump, hungry for power, tries to wrestle away GOP fundraising," 9 Mar. 2021 The gravitational-wave observatories LIGO and Virgo have discovered another class of black holes, many millions of light-years away, that can coalesce into even bigger objects. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, "This Black Hole Was Hiding a Massive Surprise," 4 Mar. 2021 Hundreds of thousands of through-hikers coalesce around hubs on Facebook to discuss strategy and gear. Gregory Thomas, San Francisco Chronicle, "Dangers of hiking Pacific Crest Trail loom as 2021 season approaches," 21 Feb. 2021 Ten months ago, Minneapolis, and the country, seemed to coalesce around the belief that policing needed an overhaul after gruesome video footage surfaced of the last moments of Mr. Floyd’s life. New York Times, "Ten Months After George Floyd’s Death, Minneapolis Residents Are at War Over Policing," 28 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'coalesce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of coalesce

circa 1541, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for coalesce

Latin coalescere, from co- + alescere to grow — more at old

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Time Traveler for coalesce

Time Traveler

The first known use of coalesce was circa 1541

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Last Updated

5 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Coalesce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/coalesce. Accessed 16 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for coalesce

coalesce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of coalesce

formal : to come together to form one group or mass
co·​alesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Medical Definition of coalesce

: to grow together

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ -​ˈles-​ᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun

Comments on coalesce

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