coalesce

verb
co·​a·​lesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Essential Meaning of coalesce

formal : to come together to form one group or mass a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time.

Full Definition of coalesce

intransitive verb

1 : to grow together The edges of the wound coalesced.
2a : to unite into a whole : fuse separate townships have coalesced into a single, sprawling colony— Donald Gould
b : to unite for a common end : join forces people with different points of view coalesce into opposing factions— I. L. Horowitz
3 : to arise from the combination of distinct elements an organized and a popular resistance immediately coalesced— C. C. Menges

transitive verb

: to cause to unite sometimes a book coalesces a public into a mass market— Walter Meade

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun
coalescent \ ˌkō-​ə-​ˈle-​sᵊnt How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for coalesce

mix, mingle, commingle, blend, merge, coalesce, amalgamate, fuse mean to combine into a more or less uniform whole. mix may or may not imply loss of each element's identity. mix the salad greens mix a drink mingle usually suggests that the elements are still somewhat distinguishable or separately active. fear mingled with anticipation in my mind commingle implies a closer or more thorough mingling. a sense of duty commingled with a fierce pride drove her blend implies that the elements as such disappear in the resulting mixture. blended several teas to create a balanced flavor merge suggests a combining in which one or more elements are lost in the whole. in his mind reality and fantasy merged coalesce implies an affinity in the merging elements and usually a resulting organic unity. telling details that coalesce into a striking portrait amalgamate implies the forming of a close union without complete loss of individual identities. refugees who were readily amalgamated into the community fuse stresses oneness and indissolubility of the resulting product. a building in which modernism and classicism are fused

Did you know?

Coalesce unites the prefix co- ("together") and the Latin verb alescere, meaning "to grow." (The words adolescent and adult also grew from alescere.) Coalesce, which first appeared in English in the mid-16th century, is one of a number of verbs in English (along with mix, commingle, merge, and amalgamate) that refer to the act of combining parts into a whole. In particular, coalesce usually implies the merging of similar parts to form a cohesive unit.

Examples of coalesce in a Sentence

a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time.
Recent Examples on the Web One solution lawmakers may coalesce around involves a one-time loosening of the signature-gathering rules. Andrew J. Tobias, cleveland, 13 Jan. 2022 The clouds seeded by the explosions then coalesce into younger stars, like the sun, and the elements — such as carbon, oxygen, silicon and iron — are incorporated into their planets. NBC News, 12 Jan. 2022 Key to the strategy is to coalesce MAGA-movement support around certain candidates running in Republican primaries in heavily pro-Trump congressional districts where the primary victor is all but assured to win the seat in November. Colby Itkowitz, Anchorage Daily News, 27 Dec. 2021 And Phillips said his party needs to stop squabbling and instead coalesce around a new strategy to find consensus on some pieces of the legislation. Manu Raju, CNN, 20 Dec. 2021 As Jacques' and then finally Marguerite's version of events play out, some fuller picture of the truth, however subjective that may be, begins to coalesce. Leah Greenblatt, EW.com, 8 Oct. 2021 Drizzle cold water or vodka into the running processor until the dough begins to coalesce. Julia O'malley, Anchorage Daily News, 19 Aug. 2021 Every one of them can coalesce to form expectations that are unparalleled and shifting with every rip of the calendar page. Bryan Pearson, Forbes, 23 Dec. 2021 Some satisfactory abstractions coalesce from hundreds of blocks of solid color, divided by black rivulets into maplike forms. New York Times, 5 Nov. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'coalesce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of coalesce

circa 1541, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for coalesce

Latin coalescere, from co- + alescere to grow — more at old

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Time Traveler for coalesce

Time Traveler

The first known use of coalesce was circa 1541

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Dictionary Entries Near coalesce

coaler

coalesce

coalescency

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Statistics for coalesce

Last Updated

17 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Coalesce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/coalesce. Accessed 20 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for coalesce

coalesce

intransitive verb
co·​alesce | \ ˌkō-ə-ˈles How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \
coalesced; coalescing

Medical Definition of coalesce

: to grow together

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ -​ˈles-​ᵊn(t)s How to pronounce coalesce (audio) \ noun

More from Merriam-Webster on coalesce

Nglish: Translation of coalesce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of coalesce for Arabic Speakers

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