coalesce

verb
co·​a·​lesce | \ˌkō-ə-ˈles \
coalesced; coalescing

Definition of coalesce 

intransitive verb

1 : to grow together The edges of the wound coalesced.

2a : to unite into a whole : fuse separate townships have coalesced into a single, sprawling colony— Donald Gould

b : to unite for a common end : join forces people with different points of view coalesce into opposing factions— I. L. Horowitz

3 : to arise from the combination of distinct elements an organized and a popular resistance immediately coalesced— C. C. Menges

transitive verb

: to cause to unite sometimes a book coalesces a public into a mass market— Walter Meade

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Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ -​ˈle-​sᵊn(t)s \ noun
coalescent \ -​sᵊnt \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for coalesce

mix, mingle, commingle, blend, merge, coalesce, amalgamate, fuse mean to combine into a more or less uniform whole. mix may or may not imply loss of each element's identity. mix the salad greens mix a drink mingle usually suggests that the elements are still somewhat distinguishable or separately active. fear mingled with anticipation in my mind commingle implies a closer or more thorough mingling. a sense of duty commingled with a fierce pride drove her blend implies that the elements as such disappear in the resulting mixture. blended several teas to create a balanced flavor merge suggests a combining in which one or more elements are lost in the whole. in his mind reality and fantasy merged coalesce implies an affinity in the merging elements and usually a resulting organic unity. telling details that coalesce into a striking portrait amalgamate implies the forming of a close union without complete loss of individual identities. refugees who were readily amalgamated into the community fuse stresses oneness and indissolubility of the resulting product. a building in which modernism and classicism are fused

Did You Know?

Coalesce unites the prefix co- ("together") and the Latin verb alescere, meaning "to grow." (The words "adolescent" and "adult" also grew from "alescere.") "Coalesce," which first appeared in English in the mid-17th century, is one of a number of verbs in English (along with "mix," "commingle," "merge," and "amalgamate") that refer to the act of combining parts into a whole. In particular, "coalesce" usually implies the merging of similar parts to form a cohesive unit.

Examples of coalesce in a Sentence

a group of young reformers who gradually coalesced into a political movement The ice masses coalesced into a glacier over time.

Recent Examples on the Web

The end result is interiors that revel in maximalism and sheer variety yet coalesce into a harmonious and unified whole. Cynthia Frank, ELLE Decor, "House Tour: A Once-Crumbling Milan Apartment Now Revels In Maximalist Decor," 13 Mar. 2018 When Paul's suicide forest video was published, YouTube did not act until critical voices coalesced on social media and in the press. Samuel Axon, Ars Technica, "Op-ed: Logan Paul tases a dead rat, draws YouTube’s harshest crackdown yet," 9 Feb. 2018 The debate coalesced around Thursday tweets from a podcast host and vlogger known professionally as Adam22. David Z. Morris, Fortune, "Are Unpaid Internships Exploitation or Opportunity? Twitter Has Some Opinions," 8 July 2018 Democrats seem to be coalescing around former Miami Beach Mayor Phillip Levine, who got richer than Croesus in the cruise ship business and then turned his focus to politics. Chris Stirewalt, Fox News, "A defining debate for Florida politics," 28 June 2018 One account of planet formation, called core accretion, holds that planets form slowly, coalescing around rocky cores, and in a region close to their stars. Joshua Sokol, WIRED, "These Spinning Disks of Gas and Dust Reveal How Planets Get Made," 28 May 2018 The rest of the world, even China, was coalescing around a commitment to curb greenhouse gases, and the Paris accord had been signed into effect. Christopher Sellers, Vox, "How Republicans came to embrace anti-environmentalism," 6 July 2018 The poll, conducted after President Donald Trump's endorsement of Cox, showed Republican support coalescing for Cox over the other leading Republican in the race, Assemblyman Travis Allen of Huntington Beach. Angela Hart, sacbee, "Newsom, Cox, likely to advance in California governor's race, poll says," 30 May 2018 The race has been a battle of who can be the most dedicated Trump supporter and exemplifies the extent to which the Republican party has coalesced around their president. Adam Levy, CNN, "Election Day in West Virginia, Indiana, Ohio and North Carolina: What to watch," 8 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'coalesce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of coalesce

circa 1541, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for coalesce

Latin coalescere, from co- + alescere to grow — more at old

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Statistics for coalesce

Last Updated

9 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for coalesce

The first known use of coalesce was circa 1541

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More Definitions for coalesce

coalesce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of coalesce

: to come together to form one group or mass

co·​alesce | \ˌkō-ə-ˈles \
coalesced; coalescing

Medical Definition of coalesce 

: to grow together

Other Words from coalesce

coalescence \ -​ˈles-​ᵊn(t)s \ noun

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Comments on coalesce

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