cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Definition of cite

transitive verb

1 : to call upon officially or authoritatively to appear (as before a court)
2 : to quote by way of example, authority, or proof cites several noteworthy authors
3a : to refer to especially : to mention formally in commendation or praise She was cited for bravery.
b : to name in a citation cited by the trustees for his work in public health
4 : to bring forward or call to another's attention especially as an example, proof, or precedent cited the weather as a reason for canceling the picnic cited several studies that support his theory

Other Words from cite

citable \ ˈsī-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce cite (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for cite

summon, call, cite, convoke, convene, muster mean to demand the presence of. summon implies the exercise of authority. was summoned to answer charges call may be used less formally for summon. called the legislature into special session cite implies a summoning to court usually to answer a charge. cited for drunken driving convoke implies a summons to assemble for deliberative or legislative purposes. convoked a Vatican council convene is somewhat less formal than convoke. convened the students muster suggests a calling up of a number of things that form a group in order that they may be exhibited, displayed, or utilized as a whole. mustered the troops

Cite, Sight, and Site

The three homophones cite, sight, and site are occasionally confused by some people when used as nouns (sight and site) or as verbs (all three words). They needn’t cause trouble: with a little thought, most people who struggle with them can settle upon the correct choice.

Cite is most often encountered in the sense of “to name in a citation”; it may also mean “to mention as an example” or “to order to appear in a court of law.“

Most of the senses of sight are concerned with the act or action of seeing. A wonderful spectacle might be described as a sight, as might the general capacity to see anything (“my sight is not as good as it once was”).

Site is most often concerned with location; it is related to the verb situate "to locate" and situation "a position." A building site is the place where the building is, or will be, located. In contemporary English, site has increasingly been used as a shortened form of website, for the location of a specific page on the Internet.

If you connect citation with cite, eyesight with sight, and situate with site, you are unlikely to make an error.

Examples of cite in a Sentence

The article cites several experts on the subject. The museum had often been cited as an example of successful fund-raising. He cited evidence suggesting she was in the area when the crime was committed. She was cited for reckless driving.
Recent Examples on the Web Prosecutors cite the 2017 email exchange as key to illuminating the corrupt intent of Flynn’s dealings with Ridley-Thomas, and before him, Bass. Matt Hamilton, Los Angeles Times, 7 Sep. 2022 At one point, Pratt prophetically warned that Utah state law requires officers to arrest or cite someone in all domestic violence responses – because not doing so can be deadly. Michael Ruiz, Fox News, 31 Aug. 2022 In their motion to throw out the convictions and sentence, Blakely’s lawyers cite the TV station reporting and argue that Alabama state law does require all judges to be licensed by the Bar. Ashley Remkus | Aremkus@al.com, al, 31 Aug. 2022 Inflation and supply chain issues have complicated those efforts, and critics cite concerns about an increase in food waste and the potential for paying for food for kids who don’t need it. Chelsea Sheasley, The Christian Science Monitor, 29 Aug. 2022 It’s a small club but members cite benefits like being spared distracting small talk and weird-smelling food wafting from the microwave. Katherine Bindley, WSJ, 26 Aug. 2022 In reports to the FTC, companies conducting third-party audits may simply say, or cite statements by the company under audit, that the company is in compliance. Brian Fung, CNN, 25 Aug. 2022 In response to an open-ended question, 20% cite the economy in general and another 11% inflation in particular as their top issue. Susan Page, USA TODAY, 28 July 2022 Insights from the study concur: 97% of generation Z members cite positive mental health as their second most important life goal, and 64% don’t want kids to protect their mental health. Christine Michel Carter, Forbes, 20 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cite

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cite

Middle English, from Anglo-French citer to cite, summon, from Latin citare to put in motion, rouse, summon, from frequentative of ciēre to stir, move — more at -kinesis

Learn More About cite

Time Traveler for cite

Time Traveler

The first known use of cite was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near cite

citatory

cite

Cithaeron

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for cite

Last Updated

28 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cite. Accessed 3 Oct. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for cite

cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Kids Definition of cite

1 : to order to appear in court She was cited for reckless driving.
2 : to quote as an example, authority, or proof He cites several experts in his report.
3 : to refer to especially in praise The school was cited as a model for others.

cite

transitive verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Legal Definition of cite

1 : to demand the appearance of in court : serve with a citation had been cited for contempt you are hereby cited to show cause in the Probate Court
2 : to quote or refer to as a precedent or authority the plaintiff cites several cases for the proposition

History and Etymology for cite

Latin citare to rouse, call on, summon

More from Merriam-Webster on cite

Nglish: Translation of cite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cite for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Challenging Words You Should Know

  • hedgehog reading a book
  • Often used to describe “the march of time,” what does inexorable mean?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!