cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Definition of cite

transitive verb

1 : to call upon officially or authoritatively to appear (as before a court)
2 : to quote by way of example, authority, or proof cites several noteworthy authors
3a : to refer to especially : to mention formally in commendation or praise She was cited for bravery.
b : to name in a citation cited by the trustees for his work in public health
4 : to bring forward or call to another's attention especially as an example, proof, or precedent cited the weather as a reason for canceling the picnic cited several studies that support his theory

Other Words from cite

citable \ ˈsī-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce cite (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for cite

summon, call, cite, convoke, convene, muster mean to demand the presence of. summon implies the exercise of authority. was summoned to answer charges call may be used less formally for summon. called the legislature into special session cite implies a summoning to court usually to answer a charge. cited for drunken driving convoke implies a summons to assemble for deliberative or legislative purposes. convoked a Vatican council convene is somewhat less formal than convoke. convened the students muster suggests a calling up of a number of things that form a group in order that they may be exhibited, displayed, or utilized as a whole. mustered the troops

Cite, Sight, and Site

The three homophones cite, sight, and site are occasionally confused by some people when used as nouns (sight and site) or as verbs (all three words). They needn’t cause trouble: with a little thought, most people who struggle with them can settle upon the correct choice.

Cite is most often encountered in the sense of “to name in a citation”; it may also mean “to mention as an example” or “to order to appear in a court of law.“

Most of the senses of sight are concerned with the act or action of seeing. A wonderful spectacle might be described as a sight, as might the general capacity to see anything (“my sight is not as good as it once was”).

Site is most often concerned with location; it is related to the verb situate "to locate" and situation "a position." A building site is the place where the building is, or will be, located. In contemporary English, site has increasingly been used as a shortened form of website, for the location of a specific page on the Internet.

If you connect citation with cite, eyesight with sight, and situate with site, you are unlikely to make an error.

Examples of cite in a Sentence

The article cites several experts on the subject. The museum had often been cited as an example of successful fund-raising. He cited evidence suggesting she was in the area when the crime was committed. She was cited for reckless driving.
Recent Examples on the Web In general, Hispanic voters cite inflation and the economy as by far their top issues for 2022. Ruy Teixeira, WSJ, 4 Aug. 2022 Many businesses cite cash flow as their top reason for failing. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 3 Aug. 2022 Fed officials who publicly support a rate hike also cite a strong job market as evidence the economy can stand higher borrowing costs. CBS News, 26 July 2022 Many Bisbee locals cite vacation rentals as a culprit to the housing issue. Sarah Lapidus, The Arizona Republic, 24 July 2022 No racial or ethnic group was likelier than Hispanic voters to cite the economy or inflation as the most important issue facing the country, with 42 percent citing an economic problem compared with 35 percent of non-Hispanic voters. New York Times, 13 July 2022 Experts also cite stress reduction and attention building as key benefits. David Allan, CNN, 6 July 2022 Several candidates cite their anger over district mask mandates, which were banned by the Legislature in November, as a motivation for entering the race. Scott Travis, Sun Sentinel, 24 June 2022 Of those women who leave the engineering profession, 30% cite the workplace environment as the reason, the society reports. Danyelle Tauryce Ireland, The Conversation, 23 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cite

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cite

Middle English, from Anglo-French citer to cite, summon, from Latin citare to put in motion, rouse, summon, from frequentative of ciēre to stir, move — more at -kinesis

Learn More About cite

Time Traveler for cite

Time Traveler

The first known use of cite was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near cite

citatory

cite

Cithaeron

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Statistics for cite

Last Updated

11 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cite. Accessed 18 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for cite

cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Kids Definition of cite

1 : to order to appear in court She was cited for reckless driving.
2 : to quote as an example, authority, or proof He cites several experts in his report.
3 : to refer to especially in praise The school was cited as a model for others.

cite

transitive verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Legal Definition of cite

1 : to demand the appearance of in court : serve with a citation had been cited for contempt you are hereby cited to show cause in the Probate Court
2 : to quote or refer to as a precedent or authority the plaintiff cites several cases for the proposition

History and Etymology for cite

Latin citare to rouse, call on, summon

More from Merriam-Webster on cite

Nglish: Translation of cite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cite for Arabic Speakers

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