cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Definition of cite

transitive verb

1 : to call upon officially or authoritatively to appear (as before a court)
2 : to quote by way of example, authority, or proof cites several noteworthy authors
3a : to refer to especially : to mention formally in commendation or praise She was cited for bravery.
b : to name in a citation cited by the trustees for his work in public health
4 : to bring forward or call to another's attention especially as an example, proof, or precedent cited the weather as a reason for canceling the picnic cited several studies that support his theory

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Other Words from cite

citable \ ˈsī-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce cite (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for cite

summon, call, cite, convoke, convene, muster mean to demand the presence of. summon implies the exercise of authority. was summoned to answer charges call may be used less formally for summon. called the legislature into special session cite implies a summoning to court usually to answer a charge. cited for drunken driving convoke implies a summons to assemble for deliberative or legislative purposes. convoked a Vatican council convene is somewhat less formal than convoke. convened the students muster suggests a calling up of a number of things that form a group in order that they may be exhibited, displayed, or utilized as a whole. mustered the troops

Cite, Sight, and Site

The three homophones cite, sight, and site are occasionally confused by some people when used as nouns (sight and site) or as verbs (all three words). They needn’t cause trouble: with a little thought, most people who struggle with them can settle upon the correct choice.

Cite is most often encountered in the sense of “to name in a citation”; it may also mean “to mention as an example” or “to order to appear in a court of law.“

Most of the senses of sight are concerned with the act or action of seeing. A wonderful spectacle might be described as a sight, as might the general capacity to see anything (“my sight is not as good as it once was”).

Site is most often concerned with location; it is related to the verb situate "to locate" and situation "a position." A building site is the place where the building is, or will be, located. In contemporary English, site has increasingly been used as a shortened form of website, for the location of a specific page on the Internet.

If you connect citation with cite, eyesight with sight, and situate with site, you are unlikely to make an error.

Examples of cite in a Sentence

The article cites several experts on the subject. The museum had often been cited as an example of successful fund-raising. He cited evidence suggesting she was in the area when the crime was committed. She was cited for reckless driving.
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Recent Examples on the Web Working with the economics department at George Mason University, an institution whose work conservatives often cite, the pro-immigration group FWD.us issued a recent paper that looked out further, projecting the size of the workforce through 2050. Ronald Brownstein, CNN, "The racist 'replacement theory' has it all backward," 23 Apr. 2021 Some scientists cite a failure to replace outstanding faculty who left Carnegie in response to the changing culture; for instance, the global ecology department has just one principal investigator. Meredith Wadman, Science | AAAS, "Uproar over sale of iconic Carnegie Institution headquarters to Qatar exposes deeper tensions," 16 Apr. 2021 The two dog owners decided to handle the injuries between themselves, but police will cite the one owner for having the dog running at large. cleveland, "Motorists see red when drunken driver sits at green light: Olmsted Falls Police Blotter," 16 Apr. 2021 While proponents cite therapeutic applications such as battling anxiety, epileptic seizures and Parkinson’s disease, what’s made this minor cannabinoid a darling of the cannabis business is its reputation as an appetite suppressant. Los Angeles Times, "Overwhelmed by all the non-THC cannabis alternatives? Our weed guru breaks it down," 15 Apr. 2021 While the city cannot cite people for camping in public when no vouchers are available, the new rock installation appears intended to keep any new tents from being erected at the old encampment site. Gary Warth, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Rocks installed to discourage new homeless tents alongside Oceanside street," 14 Apr. 2021 Schumacher’s controversial ideals included hiring a private police force at taxpayer expense to hunt down and cite open businesses and pedestrians who walked together but may not be from the same household. Tori Richards, Washington Examiner, "Democratic councilwoman ordered to pay $47,000 for filing frivolous restraining orders," 9 Apr. 2021 The stations are seen as key to addressing the range anxiety that many consumers cite when ruling out an EV purchase, out of fear they may be stranded too far away from a charging opportunity. Timothy Puko, WSJ, "Biden Proposal to Add EV Charging Stations Faces Bumpy Road," 5 Apr. 2021 The civil lawsuit and Office of Special Prosecutions report both cite the video and audio recordings of the confrontation as well as subsequent interviews with the involved officers. Tess Williams, Anchorage Daily News, "Family of man shot and killed by Anchorage police is suing the city and officers for $20 million," 3 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cite

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cite

Middle English, from Anglo-French citer to cite, summon, from Latin citare to put in motion, rouse, summon, from frequentative of ciēre to stir, move — more at -kinesis

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Time Traveler for cite

Time Traveler

The first known use of cite was in the 15th century

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Statistics for cite

Last Updated

7 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cite. Accessed 18 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for cite

cite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cite

: to write or say the words of (a book, author, etc.)
: to mention (something) especially as an example or to support an idea or opinion
law : to order (someone) to appear before a court of law

cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Kids Definition of cite

1 : to order to appear in court She was cited for reckless driving.
2 : to quote as an example, authority, or proof He cites several experts in his report.
3 : to refer to especially in praise The school was cited as a model for others.
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Legal Definition of cite

1 : to demand the appearance of in court : serve with a citation had been cited for contempt you are hereby cited to show cause in the Probate Court
2 : to quote or refer to as a precedent or authority the plaintiff cites several cases for the proposition

History and Etymology for cite

Latin citare to rouse, call on, summon

More from Merriam-Webster on cite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cite

Nglish: Translation of cite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cite for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cite

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