cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Definition of cite

transitive verb

1 : to call upon officially or authoritatively to appear (as before a court)
2 : to quote by way of example, authority, or proof cites several noteworthy authors
3a : to refer to especially : to mention formally in commendation or praise She was cited for bravery.
b : to name in a citation cited by the trustees for his work in public health
4 : to bring forward or call to another's attention especially as an example, proof, or precedent cited the weather as a reason for canceling the picnic cited several studies that support his theory

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Other Words from cite

citable \ ˈsī-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce citable (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for cite

summon, call, cite, convoke, convene, muster mean to demand the presence of. summon implies the exercise of authority. was summoned to answer charges call may be used less formally for summon. called the legislature into special session cite implies a summoning to court usually to answer a charge. cited for drunken driving convoke implies a summons to assemble for deliberative or legislative purposes. convoked a Vatican council convene is somewhat less formal than convoke. convened the students muster suggests a calling up of a number of things that form a group in order that they may be exhibited, displayed, or utilized as a whole. mustered the troops

Cite, Sight, and Site

The three homophones cite, sight, and site are occasionally confused by some people when used as nouns (sight and site) or as verbs (all three words). They needn’t cause trouble: with a little thought, most people who struggle with them can settle upon the correct choice.

Cite is most often encountered in the sense of “to name in a citation”; it may also mean “to mention as an example” or “to order to appear in a court of law.“

Most of the senses of sight are concerned with the act or action of seeing. A wonderful spectacle might be described as a sight, as might the general capacity to see anything (“my sight is not as good as it once was”).

Site is most often concerned with location; it is related to the verb situate "to locate" and situation "a position." A building site is the place where the building is, or will be, located. In contemporary English, site has increasingly been used as a shortened form of website, for the location of a specific page on the Internet.

If you connect citation with cite, eyesight with sight, and situate with site, you are unlikely to make an error.

Examples of cite in a Sentence

The article cites several experts on the subject. The museum had often been cited as an example of successful fund-raising. He cited evidence suggesting she was in the area when the crime was committed. She was cited for reckless driving.
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Recent Examples on the Web

People also reports, citing The Blast, that actually both artists were paid $8 million for their respective headlining shows: $4 million for the first weekend and the other $4 million for the second. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Actually, Ariana Grande and Beyoncé Were Probably Paid About the Same for Coachella," 19 Apr. 2019 Erica worked as an elementary school math teacher for over a decade, and now serves as an education consultant, cites the Dallas Morning News. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Julián Castro's Wife Erica Lira Could Be America's Future First Lady," 11 Apr. 2019 Judge Miller ruled the male-only draft registration unconstitutional, and cited a couple of reasons. Andrew Moseman, Popular Mechanics, "Why a Judge Ruled the Males-Only Military Draft Unconstitutional," 25 Feb. 2019 And in that year, fentanyl was the 10th most frequently cited drug and only mentioned in 4 percent of deaths. Sarah Jacoby, SELF, "Fentanyl Now Officially Causes the Most Drug Overdose Deaths in the U.S.," 20 Dec. 2018 Missing their families, not knowing how to answer when people ask about holiday plans, nostalgia for happier times, and having nowhere to go for the holidays are just some of the reasons cited for this. Ashley Edwards Walker, Good Housekeeping, "Modern Estrangement: What Does It Mean to Be Estranged, Anyway?," 21 Dec. 2018 Cathy once told a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, a detail cited in his New York Times obituary. Rachel Sugar, Vox, "The controversial conservative chain is poised to become the third-largest fast-food brand in the US this year.," 20 Dec. 2018 Here’s a look at the gains Nvidia saw when activating DLSS in Anthem on a Core i9-9900K system: Nvidia Note that Nvidia’s numbers cite 4K performance alone, even with the more mainstream GeForce RTX 2060. Brad Chacos, PCWorld, "BioWare's Anthem adds DLSS support as Nvidia's RTX push continues," 26 Mar. 2019 Taylor HillGetty Images When John Carreyrou’s Wall Street Journal article came out in October 2015, citing whistleblowers who doubted the ability of Theranos’s central product to do any of what the company claimed, everything came crashing down. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Elizabeth Holmes Is a Tragic Figure," 18 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cite

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cite

Middle English, from Anglo-French citer to cite, summon, from Latin citare to put in motion, rouse, summon, from frequentative of ciēre to stir, move — more at -kinesis

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Statistics for cite

Last Updated

11 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cite

The first known use of cite was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for cite

cite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cite

: to write or say the words of (a book, author, etc.)
: to mention (something) especially as an example or to support an idea or opinion
law : to order (someone) to appear before a court of law

cite

verb
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Kids Definition of cite

1 : to order to appear in court She was cited for reckless driving.
2 : to quote as an example, authority, or proof He cites several experts in his report.
3 : to refer to especially in praise The school was cited as a model for others.
\ ˈsīt How to pronounce cite (audio) \
cited; citing

Legal Definition of cite

1 : to demand the appearance of in court : serve with a citation had been cited for contempt you are hereby cited to show cause in the Probate Court
2 : to quote or refer to as a precedent or authority the plaintiff cites several cases for the proposition

History and Etymology for cite

Latin citare to rouse, call on, summon

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More from Merriam-Webster on cite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cite

Spanish Central: Translation of cite

Nglish: Translation of cite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cite for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cite

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