cite

verb
\ ˈsīt \
cited; citing

Definition of cite

transitive verb

1 : to call upon officially or authoritatively to appear (as before a court)
2 : to quote by way of example, authority, or proof cites several noteworthy authors
3a : to refer to especially : to mention formally in commendation or praise She was cited for bravery.
b : to name in a citation cited by the trustees for his work in public health
4 : to bring forward or call to another's attention especially as an example, proof, or precedent cited the weather as a reason for canceling the picnic cited several studies that support his theory

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Other Words from cite

citable \ ˈsī-​tə-​bəl \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for cite

summon, call, cite, convoke, convene, muster mean to demand the presence of. summon implies the exercise of authority. was summoned to answer charges call may be used less formally for summon. called the legislature into special session cite implies a summoning to court usually to answer a charge. cited for drunken driving convoke implies a summons to assemble for deliberative or legislative purposes. convoked a Vatican council convene is somewhat less formal than convoke. convened the students muster suggests a calling up of a number of things that form a group in order that they may be exhibited, displayed, or utilized as a whole. mustered the troops

Cite, Sight, and Site

The three homophones cite, sight, and site are occasionally confused by some people when used as nouns (sight and site) or as verbs (all three words). They needn’t cause trouble: with a little thought, most people who struggle with them can settle upon the correct choice.

Cite is most often encountered in the sense of “to name in a citation”; it may also mean “to mention as an example” or “to order to appear in a court of law.“

Most of the senses of sight are concerned with the act or action of seeing. A wonderful spectacle might be described as a sight, as might the general capacity to see anything (“my sight is not as good as it once was”).

Site is most often concerned with location; it is related to the verb situate "to locate" and situation "a position." A building site is the place where the building is, or will be, located. In contemporary English, site has increasingly been used as a shortened form of website, for the location of a specific page on the Internet.

If you connect citation with cite, eyesight with sight, and situate with site, you are unlikely to make an error.

Examples of cite in a Sentence

The article cites several experts on the subject. The museum had often been cited as an example of successful fund-raising. He cited evidence suggesting she was in the area when the crime was committed. She was cited for reckless driving.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Intel cited a weakening market for NAND flash, and forecast that the trend will continue. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Intel addresses processor shortages, CEO hunt after reporting disappointing fourth-quarter results," 24 Jan. 2019 According to Flight Radar, which cited an unconfirmed report from Russian state media outlet RT, the man demanded the Aeroflot plane be diverted to Afghanistan. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Drunken Siberian Man Hijacks Commercial Plane Bound for Moscow," 22 Jan. 2019 One of the main hazards that bloggers cite when talking about candles are the wicks—lead wicks to be exact. Sam Gutierrez, House Beautiful, "Are Your Favorite Candles Slowly Poisoning You?," 26 Dec. 2018 But the growth was from 2017, while the three government changes cited by USTelecom took effect in 2018. Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica, "AT&T/Verizon lobby misunderstands arrow of time, makes impossible claim," 6 Dec. 2018 This isn’t a blanket ban on vapes, according to the Post, which cites an anonymous FDA official. Rachel Becker, The Verge, "What a ban on e-cigarette flavors could mean for Big Tobacco," 9 Nov. 2018 There have been no studies more recent than the old ones cited by Breathe and others, except for a few on nasal sprays, which exist in prescription form. Cheryl Wischhover, Vox, "These new vape companies want you to inhale ... vitamins," 24 Oct. 2018 Amazon even cited access to airports as one of the factors in their choosing New York City as a site for a new headquarters in the borough of Queens, home to JFK and LGA. Barbara Peterson, Condé Nast Traveler, "New York's Airports Are Getting Billion-Dollar Makeovers—But What Will They Actually Change?," 21 Nov. 2018 In the end, Hudson chose to keep West on her team, citing his distinctive voice. Temi Adebowale, Country Living, "'The Voice' Fans Cannot Believe Jennifer Hudson Eliminated Matt Johnson Last Night," 23 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cite

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cite

Middle English, from Anglo-French citer to cite, summon, from Latin citare to put in motion, rouse, summon, from frequentative of ciēre to stir, move — more at -kinesis

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Statistics for cite

Last Updated

16 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cite

The first known use of cite was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for cite

cite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cite

: to write or say the words of (a book, author, etc.)
: to mention (something) especially as an example or to support an idea or opinion
law : to order (someone) to appear before a court of law

cite

verb
\ ˈsīt \
cited; citing

Kids Definition of cite

1 : to order to appear in court She was cited for reckless driving.
2 : to quote as an example, authority, or proof He cites several experts in his report.
3 : to refer to especially in praise The school was cited as a model for others.
\ ˈsīt \
cited; citing

Legal Definition of cite

1 : to demand the appearance of in court : serve with a citation had been cited for contempt you are hereby cited to show cause in the Probate Court
2 : to quote or refer to as a precedent or authority the plaintiff cites several cases for the proposition

History and Etymology for cite

Latin citare to rouse, call on, summon

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More from Merriam-Webster on cite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cite

Spanish Central: Translation of cite

Nglish: Translation of cite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cite for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cite

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