chasten

verb
chas·ten | \ˈchā-sᵊn \
chastened; chastening\ˈchās-niŋ, ˈchā-sᵊn-iŋ \

Definition of chasten 

transitive verb

1 : to correct by punishment or suffering : discipline If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men — 2 Samuel 7: 14 (King James Version) also : purify

2a : to prune (something, such as a work or style of art) of excess, pretense, or falsity : refine

b : to cause to be more humble or restrained : subdue He was chastened by his team's defeat.

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Other Words from chasten

chastener \ˈchās-nər, ˈchā-sᵊn-ər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for chasten

punish, chastise, castigate, chasten, discipline, correct mean to inflict a penalty on in requital for wrongdoing. punish implies subjecting to a penalty for wrongdoing. punished for stealing chastise may apply to either the infliction of corporal punishment or to verbal censure or denunciation. chastised his son for neglecting his studies castigate usually implies a severe, typically public censure. an editorial castigating the entire city council chasten suggests any affliction or trial that leaves one humbled or subdued. chastened by a landslide election defeat discipline implies a punishing or chastening in order to bring under control. parents must discipline their children correct implies punishing aimed at reforming an offender. the function of prison is to correct the wrongdoer

Did You Know?

If you say you would "castigate" or "chastise" someone in order to "chasten" them, you demonstrate a good knowledge of the origin of "chasten" - all three verbs derive from the Latin verb castigare, meaning "to punish." The trio shares an initial sense of "to subject to severe and often physical punishment," but all three verbs are now as likely to refer to a verbal dressing-down as a physical lesson. "Chasten" (which arrived in English via Anglo-French chastier) can also be used to mean "to prune of excess, pretense, or falsity." This led to the more general sense of "to make more subdued," although the humility can be imposed by a humiliating situation as easily as by a strict taskmaster.

Examples of chasten in a Sentence

chastened the child with five minutes of sitting in the corner the unexpected loss to a second-rate player really chastened the tournament's top-seeded tennis star

Recent Examples on the Web

At the rights council, the United States has recently been the most unabashed critic of rights abuses in China — whose growing economic and diplomatic clout has chastened some other would-be critics, rights advocates say. Washington Post, "US leaving UN’s Human Rights Council, cites anti-Israel bias," 20 June 2018 But the recent price bust chastened both seasoned executives and young people about to enter the industry. Houston Chronicle, "Competition for top talent keeps pay scale high in oil industry," 13 July 2018 He was chastened against Belgium, even discouraging the referee from checking VAR at one point. Jonathan Wilson, SI.com, "The Danger of Overreacting to Brazil's Disappointing World Cup Exit," 7 July 2018 Feeling chastened, perhaps, Neymar trimmed his mohawk before the final group-stage game. Dan Adler, Vanities, "The World Cup Is Halfway Over, Here’s What Comes Next," 29 June 2018 The episode chastened the APA, which established the rule in 1973. Leonard L. Glass, STAT, "The Goldwater rule is broken. Here’s how to fix it," 28 June 2018 And there is little sign that Trump was chastened by this experience. Eric Levitz, Daily Intelligencer, "Paul Ryan Scrambles to Block Vote on DREAM Act," 17 May 2018 That attack also followed an alleged chemical-weapons attack, but what was meant to chasten the Assad regime and its allies at the time did nothing of the sort. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, "The many things Trump didn’t accomplish in the latest Syria strike," 16 Apr. 2018 Fired abruptly by President Trump last year as the Russia investigation engulfed the young Trump administration, Mr. Comey has returned to the public spotlight, chastening the president on Twitter and writing a best-seller. Adam Goldman, New York Times, "Comey Often Thought He Knew Best. That May Have Hurt the F.B.I.," 14 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chasten.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chasten

1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for chasten

alteration of obsolete English chaste to chasten, from Middle English, from Anglo-French chastier, from Latin castigare, from castus + -igare (from agere to drive) — more at act

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Statistics for chasten

Last Updated

11 Oct 2018

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Time Traveler for chasten

The first known use of chasten was in 1526

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More Definitions for chasten

chasten

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chasten

: to cause (someone) to feel sad or embarrassed about something that has happened

chasten

verb
chas·ten | \ˈchā-sᵊn \
chastened; chastening

Kids Definition of chasten

: to correct by punishment : discipline

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Comments on chasten

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