cede

verb
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Definition of cede

transitive verb

1 : to yield or grant typically by treaty Russia ceded Alaska to the U.S. in 1867.
2 : assign, transfer ceded his stock holdings to his children

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Other Words from cede

ceder noun

Do you cede or seed control?

Cede means "to yield or grant typically by treaty." Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean "to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds." If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

Did You Know?

Cede is often a formal term used in discussing territory and rights, but is also used less formally. So, for example, Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the U.S. in 1898, following the Spanish-American War, and the U.S. ceded control of the Panama Canal to Panama in 1999. Critics warn that we are ceding leadership in alternative-energy technology to China. Citizens of one European country or another are always worrying that their own country is ceding too much power to the European Union. A tennis player doesn't have any choice when she cedes her no. 1 ranking to a rival.

Examples of cede in a Sentence

Russia ceded Alaska to the U.S. in 1867. she reluctantly ceded her position as leader
Recent Examples on the Web But the left tackle spot could be ceded to Andre Dillard, last year’s first-round draft choice, with Philadelphia operating a virtual offseason program instead of getting hands-on work with its new players. Mark Inabinett | Minabinett@al.com, al, "Prince Tega Wanogho hopes to inspire ‘kids back home’," 6 May 2020 Having ceded its traditional place on the calendar for the first time since World War II, the Kentucky Derby has been rescheduled for September 5 as a concession to the coronavirus. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, "Despite coronavirus-related uncertainties, officials say a 2020 Kentucky Derby remains definite," 2 May 2020 In 1907, the Kenora Thistles, based in tiny Kenora, Ontario, defeated the Montreal Wanderers in a two-game, total-goals challenge series (the Thistles would cede it back to Montreal in a rematch two months later). Michael Weinreb, Smithsonian Magazine, "When the Stanley Cup Finals Was Cancelled Because of an Pandemic," 18 Mar. 2020 The people who could not fit inside one of the vaults—many men ceded their places to women and children—remained exposed on the shore. Joan Acocella, The New Yorker, "The Terror and the Fascination of Pompeii," 10 Feb. 2020 In the middle of the chaos generated by the worst economic crisis suffered by the country in its history, Maduro is taking actions to cede, transfer, and hand over oil operations to private capital. Clifford Krauss, BostonGlobe.com, "To survive, Venezuela’s leader gives up decades of control over oil," 8 Feb. 2020 Another is the government’s ceding responsibility for basic research to private enterprise, which doesn’t like to do much of it. Los Angeles Times, "Column: America’s poor record on COVID-19 reflects stagnant federal science funding," 28 Apr. 2020 His stark departure from the more bipartisan tone of his announcement Thursday night suggested Trump was ceding any semblance of national leadership on the pandemic, and choosing instead to divide the country by playing to his political base. Sarah Mervosh, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump encourages protests in states with stay-at-home orders, alarming governors," 17 Apr. 2020 Courts have ruled consistently for years that the authority to order quarantines inside states rests almost entirely with the states, under provisions in the Constitution ceding power not explicitly delegated to the federal government to states. The Christian Science Monitor, "Trump extends social distancing rules, states push quarantines," 30 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cede

1749, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cede

borrowed from French or Latin; French céder, borrowed from Latin cēdere "to go, move away, withdraw, yield," perhaps, if derived from an originally transitive meaning "drive away," akin to Sanskrit sedhati "(she/he) chases away," Avestan siiazdat "will chase away"

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Learn More about cede

Statistics for cede

Last Updated

18 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cede. Accessed 31 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for cede

cede

verb
How to pronounce cede (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cede

formal : to give control of (something) to another person, group, government, etc.

cede

verb
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Kids Definition of cede

: to give up especially by treaty The land was ceded to another country.
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Legal Definition of cede

1 : to yield or grant usually by treaty
3 : to transfer (all or part of one's liability as an insurer under an insurance policy) by reinsurance to another insurer

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More from Merriam-Webster on cede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cede

Spanish Central: Translation of cede

Nglish: Translation of cede for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cede for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cede

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