cede

verb
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Definition of cede

transitive verb

1 : to yield or grant typically by treaty Russia ceded Alaska to the U.S. in 1867.
2 : assign, transfer ceded his stock holdings to his children

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Other Words from cede

ceder noun

Do you cede or seed control?

Cede means "to yield or grant typically by treaty." Most of the verb senses of seed are concerned with planting seeds (either literal, as of plants, or figuratively, as of ideas). However, the word may also be used to mean "to schedule (tournament players or teams) so that superior ones will not meet in early rounds." If you relinquish or yield something you are ceding it, and if you are organizing the participants in a tournament you are seeding them.

Did You Know?

Cede is often a formal term used in discussing territory and rights, but is also used less formally. So, for example, Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the U.S. in 1898, following the Spanish-American War, and the U.S. ceded control of the Panama Canal to Panama in 1999. Critics warn that we are ceding leadership in alternative-energy technology to China. Citizens of one European country or another are always worrying that their own country is ceding too much power to the European Union. A tennis player doesn't have any choice when she cedes her no. 1 ranking to a rival.

Examples of cede in a Sentence

Russia ceded Alaska to the U.S. in 1867. she reluctantly ceded her position as leader

Recent Examples on the Web

The American Association of University Professors had already called on universities to end confidential contracts with Hanban and renegotiate those that ceded control over academic decisions to China. Nanette Asimov, SFChronicle.com, "SFSU shutters popular Chinese cultural program under pressure from feds," 5 Aug. 2019 Many drivers today cede way-finding to apps like Waze, which draws on the hive-mind intelligence of other vehicles to ease bottlenecks and dodge perils. Nathan Heller, The New Yorker, "Was the Automotive Era a Terrible Mistake?," 22 July 2019 Move back, relocate, essentially cede the land to nature. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "Can Coastal California Adapt to Climate Change?," 15 July 2019 Under Michigan’s previous governor, Rick Snyder, a Republican, the school district entered agreements that ceded some local control and called for financial and academic overhauls. Mitch Smith, New York Times, "Michigan Officials Say a Struggling School Should Close. Residents See Racism.," 15 June 2019 The settlement marks the end of a tumultuous fight between Xerox and Icahn over a transaction that would cede control of the once-iconic American innovator synonymous with office copy machines to a Japanese company. Fortune, "Xerox Has Killed Its Merger With Fujifilm and Carl Icahn Is 'Extremely Pleased'," 14 May 2018 The island, which has a population of about 3.4 million, has been part of the United States since 1898, when Spain ceded it at the end of the Spanish-American War. Suhauna Hussain, Los Angeles Times, "The massive push for Puerto Rico Gov. Rossello to resign grew from several key factors," 23 July 2019 The pair’s return to the backline injected a new sense of calm to the Pride defense, which has ceded the most goals (31) in the National Women’s Soccer League. Julia Poe, Pro Soccer USA, "Orlando Pride get jolt from return of World Cup players, fans during win over Sky Blue FC," 23 July 2019 The state of Washington includes millions of acres that the Yakamas ceded to the United States under pressure. David G. Savage, latimes.com, "On an often unpredictable Supreme Court, Justice Gorsuch is the latest wild card," 12 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cede

1749, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cede

borrowed from French or Latin; French céder, borrowed from Latin cēdere "to go, move away, withdraw, yield," perhaps, if derived from an originally transitive meaning "drive away," akin to Sanskrit sedhati "(she/he) chases away," Avestan siiazdat "will chase away"

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Learn More about cede

Dictionary Entries near cede

cedar rust

cedar waxwing

cedarwood

cede

cedent

cedi

cedilla

Statistics for cede

Last Updated

11 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cede

The first known use of cede was in 1749

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More Definitions for cede

cede

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cede

formal : to give control of (something) to another person, group, government, etc.

cede

verb
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Kids Definition of cede

: to give up especially by treaty The land was ceded to another country.
\ ˈsēd How to pronounce cede (audio) \
ceded; ceding

Legal Definition of cede

1 : to yield or grant usually by treaty
3 : to transfer (all or part of one's liability as an insurer under an insurance policy) by reinsurance to another insurer

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More from Merriam-Webster on cede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cede

Spanish Central: Translation of cede

Nglish: Translation of cede for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cede for Arabic Speakers

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