brave

adjective
\ ˈbrāv How to pronounce brave (audio) \
braver; bravest

Definition of brave

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : having or showing mental or moral strength to face danger, fear, or difficulty : having or showing courage a brave soldier a brave smile
2 : making a fine show : colorful brave banners flying in the wind
3 : excellent, splendid … the brave fire I soon had going …— J. F. Dobie

brave

verb
braved; braving

Definition of brave (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to face or endure with courage braved the rush-hour traffic to get there braving the elements
2 obsolete : to make showy

intransitive verb

archaic : to show courage : to make a brave show

brave

noun

Definition of brave (Entry 3 of 3)

1 [in part borrowed from French, noun derivative of brave brave entry 1] : one with mental or moral strength to face danger, fear, or difficulty : one who is brave (see brave entry 1) … none but the brave deserves the fair.— John Dryden specifically : an American Indian warrior
2 archaic : bravado
3 archaic : bully, assassin

Other Words from brave

Adjective

bravely adverb

Verb

braver noun

Examples of brave in a Sentence

Adjective She gave us a brave smile. He lost his brave fight against the disease. Verb Thousands of fans braved rush-hour traffic to see the concert. a soldier who braved enemy fire to rescue her wounded comrade
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The outpouring of grief over on heartbreak TikTok is brave. Chanté Joseph, refinery29.com, 6 May 2022 It’s about people who were brave in different times in history that led to really, really monumental times. Jai Lennard, WSJ, 25 Apr. 2022 Ukrainians are proud and brave people who deserve our help in their time of need. Kimberly Nordyke, The Hollywood Reporter, 20 Mar. 2022 Gentle and brave people will come through this war. Christopher Vourlias, Variety, 25 Feb. 2022 The process of examining our problematic beliefs will be clumsy, says Cranston, and there should be room for those who make mistakes and are honest and brave enough to admit to those mistakes, and to apologize. Los Angeles Times, 16 Feb. 2022 Accepting personal risk, however brave or stupid, has nothing to do with how to respond to a pandemic infectious disease. Kent Sepkowitz, CNN, 14 Feb. 2022 Politkovskaya was an illustrious and brave journalist, and a sharp thorn in Putin’s side. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, 26 Jan. 2022 Momma was quite brave to think of hauling all of these small children downtown on a weekday morning. Bo Emerson, ajc, 7 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Befriend a guide and take a heart-pounding plunge down the pristine powder fields of La Foglietta or brave a leg-jellying descent to the historic hamlet of Le Monal for a memorable big day. Rob Hodgetts, CNN, 14 Feb. 2022 The job might be thankless (according to two-time host Chevy Chase) or downright career suicide, but hosting the Academy Awards remains a proverbial blue check, cementing the men and women brave enough to accept in the annals of Hollywood history. Washington Post, 22 Mar. 2022 Aleksei, 35, would brave driving around the city each day in search of food. Loveday Morris, Anastacia Galouchka, Anchorage Daily News, 19 Mar. 2022 Every year, thousands of people brave the early morning cold to catch a glimpse of boats dropping dye into the river before the city's parade begins its march through downtown. Meena Thiruvengadam, Travel + Leisure, 17 Mar. 2022 Aleksei, 35, would brave driving around the city each day in search for food. Washington Post, 16 Mar. 2022 Some Northeast Ohioans experiencing homelessness would rather brave single-digit temperatures on the street than enter a congregate shelter setting and risk exposure to the highly transmissible omicron variant of COVID-19. Cliff Pinckard, cleveland, 1 Feb. 2022 Or brave the politics and convince some folks to get vaccinated. Ed Silverman, STAT, 5 Dec. 2021 While many of those fleeing are able-bodied adults, choosing to brave long and sometimes dangerous journeys to bring themselves and their families to safety, others are at the mercy of their caregivers to deliver them out of danger. Justin Spike, ajc, 3 Mar. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Indeed, in the 19th century, Haiti was the land of the free and home of the brave to which other freedom fighters in the hemisphere, like Simón Bolívar, looked for inspiration. Marlene L. Daut, Essence, 24 Feb. 2022 In time, history will record which has done the most far-reaching harm to the United States, land of the free, home of the brave. San Diego Union-Tribune, 24 Dec. 2021 Some say that as a long-term bet, China is only for the brave. Gregor Stuart Hunter, Fortune, 9 Sep. 2021 The future is for the brave who move quickly and consider the open banking environment. Sandeepan Mukherjee, Forbes, 1 Sep. 2021 Prada and Simone Rocha showed split-sole options, while Matthew Williams’s hoof-like platform at Givenchy is truly for the brave. Steff Yotka, Vogue, 19 Mar. 2021 Only the brave at heart will want to cross this new bridge near Porto. Andrea Romano, Travel + Leisure, 7 Oct. 2020 Many respectable Americans sadly are allowing fear of ridicule and bullying to silence their voices in this land of the free and home of the brave. Mike Masterson, Arkansas Online, 27 Sep. 2020 But the movement started with Burke and a 12-year-old brave enough to speak up. USA Today, 13 Aug. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'brave.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of brave

Adjective

circa 1616, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1546, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for brave

Adjective

borrowed from Middle French, borrowed from Italian bravo "courageous, wild," perhaps ultimately going back to Latin barbarus barbarous

Verb

borrowed from Middle French braver "to challenge, flout," verbal derivative of brave brave entry 1

Noun

noun derivative of brave entry 1

Learn More About brave

Dictionary Entries Near brave

Bravais lattice

brave

bravehearted

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for brave

Last Updated

14 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Brave.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brave. Accessed 24 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for brave

brave

adjective
\ ˈbrāv How to pronounce brave (audio) \
braver; bravest

Kids Definition of brave

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: feeling or showing no fear

Other Words from brave

bravely adverb

brave

verb
braved; braving

Kids Definition of brave (Entry 2 of 3)

: to face or handle without fear

brave

noun

Kids Definition of brave (Entry 3 of 3)

: an American Indian warrior

Choose the Right Synonym for brave

Adjective

brave, courageous, and bold mean showing no fear. brave is used of a person who has or shows no fear when faced with danger or difficulty. The brave crew tried to save the ship. courageous is used of a person who is always prepared to meet danger or difficulty. The early astronauts were courageous in facing the dangers of space travel. bold is used of a person who welcomes dangerous situations. The bold explorers went in search of adventure.

More from Merriam-Webster on brave

Nglish: Translation of brave for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of brave for Arabic Speakers

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