bombard

noun
bom·bard | \ˈbäm-ˌbärd \

Definition of bombard 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a late medieval cannon used to hurl large stones

bombard

verb
bom·bard | \bäm-ˈbärd also bəm- \
bombarded; bombarding; bombards

Definition of bombard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to attack especially with artillery or bombers

2 : to assail vigorously or persistently (as with questions)

3 : to subject to the impact of rapidly moving particles (such as electrons)

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Other Words from bombard

Verb

bombardment \bäm-ˈbärd-mənt \ noun

Synonyms for bombard

Synonyms: Verb

barrage, bomb

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Choose the Right Synonym for bombard

Verb

attack, assail, assault, bombard, storm mean to make an onslaught upon. attack implies taking the initiative in a struggle. plan to attack the town at dawn assail implies attempting to break down resistance by repeated blows or shots. assailed the enemy with artillery fire assault suggests a direct attempt to overpower by suddenness and violence of onslaught. Commandos assaulted the building from all sides. bombard applies to attacking with bombs or shells. bombarded the city nightly storm implies attempting to break into a defended position. preparing to storm the fortress

Did You Know?

Verb

In the late Middle Ages, a bombard was a cannon used to hurl large stones at enemy fortifications. Its name, which first appeared in English in the 15th century, derived via Middle French and Middle English from the Latin noun bombus (a word referring to the same device). The verb "bombard" blasted onto the scene in English in 1686, with an original meaning of "to attack especially with artillery"; as weapons technology improved throughout the centuries, such artillery came to include things like automatic rifles and bomber aircraft. Nowadays one can be bombarded figuratively in any number of ways, such as by omnipresent advertising messages or persistent phone calls.

Examples of bombard in a Sentence

Verb

The navy bombarded the shore. Scientists bombarded the sample with X-rays. The car was bombarded by rocks as it drove away from the angry crowd.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

So much heat and ultraviolet radiation bombards the planet's daytime side that molecules like methane cannot form—elements on that half of the world exist in atomic form. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Researchers Discover a Planet That’s As Hot As a Star," 6 June 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

State Police leaders have been bombarded with mounting public frustration about overtime pay. Kay Lazar, BostonGlobe.com, "Records reveal trooper posts that are overtime all the time," 23 June 2018 Viewers of soccer games on British commercial TV channels have been bombarded in recent years by half-time betting advertisements, including some offering live odds based on what's already happened and what might happen. NBC News, "Supreme Court's sports betting ruling potentially opens door to U.K.-style industry," 31 May 2018 Over the past several weeks, many people have been bombarded with emails about data privacy from major corporations such as Twitter and Facebook. Alix Langone, Time, "How the E.U.’s New Online Privacy Law Could Benefit Users Everywhere," 22 May 2018 Hawaii officials have had a busy month pleading with travelers to keep their plans even as dramatic images of natural disasters afflicting the islands have bombarded televisions and social media feeds. CBS News, "Hawaii officials hope Kilauea volcano eruption won't deter travelers," 12 May 2018 For years, the residents of Huntington Beach have been bombarded with scary tales of our city's financial demise. latimes.com, "Huntington Beach takes wrong road with lawsuit against ‘sanctuary’ laws," 5 Apr. 2018 Interstate 4 drivers have reported construction-zone incidents in which their cars were skewered by projectiles, bombarded with concrete, doused in oil, submerged in floodwater, broken by potholes and whacked with light poles. Kevin Spear, OrlandoSentinel.com, "I-4 construction nightmares: Drivers seeking payment for car damage face daunting odds," 13 July 2018 Halftime: England 1, Sweden 0 England ends the half by bombarding the Sweden box with crosses and corners. Andrew Keh, New York Times, "England Takes Another Step Toward Bringing ‘It’ Home," 8 July 2018 TreatWell’s Yelp page has been bombarded with negative reviews, ABC7 reports. Paula Rogo, Essence.com, "Oh Well! Woman Who Called The Cops On Black Girl Selling Water Says Backlash Is Hurting Her Marijuana Business," 26 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bombard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bombard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1686, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for bombard

Noun

Middle English bombard, bumbard, borrowed from Middle French bombarde, probably from an onomatopoeic base bomb- + -arde -ard — more at bomb entry 1

Note: As with bomba, bombe, etc. (see note at bomb entry 1), the origin and diffusion of bombarda, bombarde, etc., remain incompletely elucidated. French bombarde, in reference to an engine of war, appears in the Vrayes chroniques of Jean le Bel, a history of the Hundred Years War begun in 1357 (see Dictionnaire du Moyen Français, online) and in the accounts of the Valenciennes city clerk Nicole de Dury from 1363 (see H. Caffiaux, Nicole de Dury, maître clerc de la ville de Valenciennes 1361-1373, Valenciennes, 1866, p. 103). Italian bombarda may be dependent on the French word, given that the earliest use of the word is in reference to artillery used at the battle of Crécy in 1346 (in the final book of the Nuova Cronica of Giovanni Villani, who died in 1348; manuscripts containing the final book are significantly later). The 1311 date given for bombarda in Trésor de la langue française, Cortelazzo and Zolli's Dizionario etimologico della lingua italiana, and a number of earlier sources from which they draw (as the Enciclopedia Italiana) is incorrect; the text in question, the Polystorio or Polyhistoria by Niccolò da Ferrara (not Bartolomeo da Ferrara), alludes to events of 1311 but was written sometime after 1367, when the chronicle ends, at the court of Niccolò II d'Este, marquess of Ferrara from 1361 (cf. Richard Tristano, "History 'Without Scruple': The Enlightenment Confronts the Middle Ages in Renaissance Ferrara," Medievalia et Humanistica, new series, no. 38 [2012], p. 85). Spanish lombarda, attested about 1400, is clearly a folk-etymologizing of bombarda (pace Coromines' etymology in Diccionario crítico-etimológico castellano e hispánico, which does not take account of the earlier French forms).

Verb

earlier, "to fire a large cannon," borrowed from Middle French bombarder, verbal derivative of bombarde bombard entry 1

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Last Updated

21 Aug 2018

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Time Traveler for bombard

The first known use of bombard was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for bombard

bombard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bombard

: to attack (a place) with bombs, large guns, etc.

: to hit or attack (something or someone) constantly or repeatedly

bombard

verb
bom·bard | \bäm-ˈbärd \
bombarded; bombarding

Kids Definition of bombard

1 : to attack with heavy fire from big guns : shell bombard a fort

2 : to hit or attack again and again We were bombarded by ads. Smells he couldn't place bombarded him.— Brian Selznick,

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