blockade

verb
block·​ade | \ blä-ˈkād How to pronounce blockade (audio) \
blockaded; blockading

Definition of blockade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to subject to a blockade

blockade

noun

Definition of blockade (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the isolation by a warring nation of an enemy area (such as a harbor) by troops or warships to prevent passage of persons or supplies broadly : a restrictive measure designed to obstruct the commerce and communications of an unfriendly nation
2 : something that blocks
3 : interruption of normal physiological function (such as transmission of nerve impulses) of a cellular receptor, tissue, or organ also : inhibition of a physiologically active substance (such as a hormone)

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from blockade

Verb

blockader noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for blockade

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of blockade in a Sentence

Verb They blockaded the country's ports. the militant protestors blockaded the whole area around city hall Noun it was the blockade of all the enemy's major ports that finally won the war
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb New York City’s port authorities blockaded ships of suspect origin, and citizen patrols sought to root out refugees, but, in the fall of 1798, the unmistakable signatures of the disease appeared upon the bodies of dead dockworkers. Frederick Kaufman, The New Yorker, "Pandemics Go Hand in Hand with Conspiracy Theories," 13 May 2020 Qatar sued Banque Havilland in London last year, accusing the lender of leading a financial attack with the aim of destabilizing the Qatari riyal at the same time as its Gulf neighbors blockaded the gas-rich nation. Jonathan Browning, Bloomberg.com, "Banque Havilland Investigated by FCA Over Qatar FX Manipulation," 29 Apr. 2020 In other towns, people blockaded entries to local hospitals, fearing the evacuees might be diverted to them. Patrick Reevell, ABC News, "Hysteria over coronavirus sparks violent protests in Ukraine," 21 Feb. 2020 Rioters had blockaded even the port in an ill-fated attempt to keep foreigners, presumed to be carriers, from disembarking their ships. James Mcclintock | Uab Professor, al, "Leaving Antarctica for a COVID-19 world," 17 Apr. 2020 Others blockaded the roads leading to Bolivian cities, cutting off supplies of food and fuel. Jon Lee Anderson, The New Yorker, "The Fall of Evo Morales," 16 Mar. 2020 And if talks collapse many fear that France’s famously truculent fishermen could blockade ports to stop movements of British fish. Stephen Castle, New York Times, "Fishing Presents a Vexing Snag in Brexit Talks," 15 Mar. 2020 Last weekend, many news outlets circulated inaccurate reports that the streets had been blockaded, neighborhoods quarantined and the town placed under a lockdown similar to the one imposed in Italy. Los Angeles Times, "In this wine-making town in Spain, the disinformation was almost as bad as the coronavirus itself," 12 Mar. 2020 American patrols have then blockaded roads, forcing these Russian patrols to turn around. Eric Schmitt, New York Times, "Russians Pressure U.S. Forces in Northeast Syria," 14 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This amounts to a speed bump for renewables, not a blockade. The Economist, "Not-so-slow burn The world’s energy system must be transformed completely," 23 May 2020 One of Taiwan's large military issues at the tactical level is the possibility of a [Chinese military] blockade that would cut the Taiwanese off from importing and exporting. Joel Gehrke, Washington Examiner, "New China cold war: US overtures to Taiwan escalate tension with Beijing," 22 May 2020 What the Fight to Take Tripoli Means for Oil Markets: QuickTake Libya has endured major disruptions to its oil exports in recent years as battles and blockades by rival militias have repeatedly hindered efforts to revive production. Salma El Wardany, Bloomberg.com, "Oil Crisis in Libya Takes Center Stage at Latest UN Talks," 19 May 2020 Another blockade strategy focuses on the cellular docking site that the virus uses. Michael Waldholz, Scientific American, "Three Ways to Make Coronavirus Drugs in a Hurry," 12 May 2020 The main event the rebels were trying to pull off was a 24-hour moving blockade on April 23, with 2,000 people surrounding JPMorgan Chase’s headquarters in midtown. Eshe Nelson, Quartz, "Covid-19 won’t stop the climate emergency—but will it stop climate-change protests?," 28 Apr. 2020 And blockades of commuter routes have also posed a threat to business travel and tourism. Audrey Carleton, Fortune, "Canadian rail blockades could have a lasting effect on U.S.-Canada trade, setting the stage for even greater fallout from coronavirus," 1 Apr. 2020 Treatments have included anticoagulation, IV immunoglobulin, IL-1 or IL-6 blockade, and corticosteroids. Christina Maxouris And Maggie Fox, CNN, "CDC will alert doctors to look out for syndrome in children that could be related to coronavirus," 13 May 2020 The region itself has largely been peaceful since the abrogation of Article 370, thanks to a sweeping security lockdown and communication blockade that has been eased slowly. Riyaz Wani, Quartz India, "India’s new domicile law for Jammu & Kashmir is making residents anxious," 6 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blockade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of blockade

Verb

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1683, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about blockade

Time Traveler for blockade

Time Traveler

The first known use of blockade was in 1563

See more words from the same year

Statistics for blockade

Last Updated

29 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Blockade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/blockade. Accessed 5 Jun. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for blockade

blockade

verb
How to pronounce blockade (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of blockade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to place a blockade on (a port or country) : to stop people or supplies from entering or leaving (a port or country) especially during a war

blockade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blockade (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of war in which one country uses ships to stop people or supplies from entering or leaving another country

blockade

verb
block·​ade | \ blä-ˈkād How to pronounce blockade (audio) \
blockaded; blockading

Kids Definition of blockade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to close off a place to prevent the coming in or going out of people or supplies

blockade

noun

Kids Definition of blockade (Entry 2 of 2)

: the closing off of a place (as by warships) to prevent the coming in or going out of people or supplies

blockade

noun
block·​ade | \ blä-ˈkād How to pronounce blockade (audio) \

Medical Definition of blockade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : interruption of normal physiological function (as transmission of nerve impulses) of a cellular receptor, tissue, or organ
b : inhibition of a physiologically active substance (as a hormone)
2 : the process of reducing the phagocytic capabilities of the mononuclear phagocyte system by loading it with harmless material (as India ink or lampblack) which engages its cells in phagocytosis and prevents them from reacting to new antigenic material — compare blocking antibody
blockaded; blockading

Medical Definition of blockade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to subject to blockade

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on blockade

What made you want to look up blockade? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

May 2020 Words of the Day Quiz

  • a blooming wisteria tree
  • Which is a synonym of exiguous?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!