cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events. Verb The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The information cascade is replaced with networked deployment. Dave Macleod, Forbes, "From A Cascade Mindset To A Networked One," 12 Apr. 2021 The cascade of negative events occurred after Kramer received his 2020 compensation. Washington Post, "CEO at troubled vaccine plant received 51 percent compensation boost in 2020," 10 Apr. 2021 That clash preceded a cascade of sanctions from the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, and the EU, which blacklisted Chinese Communist officials overseeing the Uyghur Muslim repression. Joel Gehrke, Washington Examiner, "Biden's moves against China remind Europe it doesn't have Trump to kick around anymore," 25 Mar. 2021 Trump's use of the phrase in speeches and on Twitter, which critics called racist, preceded a cascade of its use by others online. Elinor Aspegren, USA TODAY, "Every US state has at least one variant coronavirus case; Biden says 100 million vaccine goal ahead of schedule: Live COVID-19 updates," 19 Mar. 2021 The cascade of decisions to pause the use of AstraZeneca’s vaccine, mainly by European countries, followed reports of four serious cases in Norway, which were described among health workers under age 50 who received the vaccine. New York Times, "Should You Be Concerned About Blood Clots, Bleeding and the AZ-Vaccine?," 16 Mar. 2021 For the time being, the tentpoles and milestones that mark the passage of time were swept away in the cascade of postponements that became cancelations. Michael Casagrande | Mcasagrande@al.com, al, "COVID in Alabama: How the pandemic changed sports, entertainment," 10 Mar. 2021 In the cascade, objects cross each other and land in the opposite hand. Tom Vanderbilt, Wired, "Here’s What Learning to Juggle Does to Your Brain," 4 Feb. 2021 Orgasm triggers the release of a cascade of substances such as natural painkillers, stress relievers, and mood enhancers. Dr. Nan Wise, Glamour, "Is Masturbation Healthy? A Neuroscientist Weighs In," 21 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb She was obsessed with scooting the bowl across the floor, causing the water to cascade over the sides and onto the floor. Jenna Sims, Southern Living, "This $20 Spill-Proof Pet Bowl Has Saved My Floors," 1 Apr. 2021 Embroidered trapunto lilies, bedewed with seed pearls, cascade down the bodice; molten satin bubbles at the hem like a pool of candle wax. Judith Thurman, The New Yorker, "Ann Lowe’s Barrier-Breaking Mid-Century Couture," 22 Mar. 2021 Scientists hoped that positive climate tipping points might cascade across human societies. Rafil Kroll-zaidi, Harper's Magazine, "Findings," 16 Mar. 2021 The change will also cascade into state tax systems, except for those that already lack income taxes or already exempt unemployment benefits from income. Richard Rubin, WSJ, "Congress Is Poised to Upend Tax Season With New Break for Unemployment Benefits," 8 Mar. 2021 And when the inevitable increase in cases occurs (spring break is coming), that will cascade. Dallas News, "Letters to the Editor - Opening up Texas, ‘Eyes of Texas,’ For the People Act, Shingle Mountain, vaccine process," 4 Mar. 2021 Even relatively minor weather damage can quickly cascade into huge outages across the system. Tim Mcdonnell, Quartz, "Rooftop solar could kill—or save—the Texas electric grid," 3 Mar. 2021 The decisions made at the previous levels cascade down to the individual marketing subfunctions (e.g., marketing operations, portfolio marketing, demand marketing), providing the strategic clarity that these leaders often times lack. Forrester, Forbes, "How B2B CMOs Can Respond To Their CEOs’ Need For Certainty," 26 Feb. 2021 Hikers can find Punch Bowl Falls, Tunnel Falls and Twister Falls along the trail, as well as the many spectacular unnamed falls and the dozens of seasonal plunges that cascade down the cliffs during the rainy season. oregonlive, "Hikers return to Eagle Creek Trail, as one of Oregon’s best hikes reopens after fire," 9 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Time Traveler for cascade

Time Traveler

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

17 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cascade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cascade. Accessed 18 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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