cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

cataract, fall(s), waterfall

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun

Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Verb

The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And despite this cascade of scandals, 2018 also saw dozens, hundreds, of hopeful and positive deployments of machine learning and AI. James Vincent, The Verge, "The Verge 2018 tech report card: AI," 30 Dec. 2018 Equally as eye-catching was the vivid crimson pigment saturating the clean center part that separated Chopra's cascade of dark, chest-grazing waves. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Priyanka Chopra Plays Up Her Post-Wedding Glow—and Bridal Henna—With This Makeup Trick," 5 Dec. 2018 Multiple European and African languages, often untranslated, cascade from the stage; the music, composed by Philip Miller and Thuthuka Sibisi (who also conducted), is a similarly heady mixture, with marching songs, hymns, African dances, and sirens. Heidi Waleson, WSJ, "‘The Head & the Load’ and ‘Greek’ Reviews," 10 Dec. 2018 Step 4: Once guests arrive, gently pour a bottle of Champagne into the top glass and watch it cascade downwards. Lori Keong, Marie Claire, "Your Guide to All Things Champagne This New Year's Eve," 27 Dec. 2017 Months of downpours unleashed cascades of mud and water, washing away neighborhoods and killing 162. Barbara Fraser, Discover Magazine, "Understanding the Amazon By Digging Into the Ground Beneath It," 28 Sep. 2018 There was a cascade of bad news for Walker over the weekend. Scott Bauer, The Seattle Times, "Wisconsin’s Walker tries to alter conversation amid bad news," 10 Sep. 2018 The 165-foot Big Manitou Falls is the fourth highest waterfall east of the Rockies, and 31-foot Little Manitou is a beautiful twin cascade. Chelsey Lewis, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "April snow extends downhill and cross-country skiing season in Wisconsin," 19 Apr. 2018 The teased hair is practically sky high, while pieces left out cascade in soft curls to just below her shoulder. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Gigi Hadid Appears on the September "Vogue Brazil" Cover," 29 Aug. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The actress, 47, stunned in a strapless red Reem Acra dress with an asymmetrical cascading train reminiscent of a Christmas bow. Taysha Murtaugh, Country Living, "Kimberly Williams-Paisley Just Proved She’s the Queen of Christmas on the Netflix Red Carpet," 22 Nov. 2018 The debris from the crash then initiates a cascading chain reaction of billions of particles, known as an air shower, that blazes toward the ground and emits characteristic ultraviolet light. Adam Hadhazy, Discover Magazine, "Scientists Hunt for A Seeming Paradox: A Magnet With Only One Pole," 13 Nov. 2018 Ferguson's long-sleeve wrap dress featured a silk collar, an asymmetrical drape cascading down one side, and a row of buttons down the back. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Sarah Ferguson's Green Royal Wedding Dress Was a Subtle Tribute to Her Wedding to Prince Andrew," 12 Nov. 2018 That increase in sugar, Dr. Barbot said, is having a cascading effect, causing greater numbers of people to have diabetes, cavities, hypertension and other medical conditions. Melanie Grayce West, WSJ, "NYC Health Department to Lead National Charge to Cut Sugar Intake," 19 Oct. 2018 RiRi stepped out at the event in a strapless Calvin Klein by Appointment gown with major nineties vibes—and a boatload of ruffles cascading along the dress's hemlines and thigh-high slit. Krystin Arneson, Glamour, "Rihanna Looks Like an Actual Barbie in This Ruffled Hot Pink Gown," 15 Sep. 2018 In an epileptic seizure, that normal brain activity goes into overdrive, creating a cascading snowball effect that interferes with motor control and can lead to loss of consciousness. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Implantable brain device could stop epileptic seizures in their tracks," 29 Aug. 2018 This cascading effect had negative implications for stateside squadrons and pilot training. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "The Navy's Fighter Shortage Is Finally, Slowly Improving," 20 Aug. 2018 But changes to those districts could have a cascading effect, altering the demographics of some of the 22 adjacent districts. Gregory S. Schneider, Washington Post, "Virginia Republicans ask U.S. Supreme Court to postpone new legislative boundaries," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cascade

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall; especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls

: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down

: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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