cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \(ˌ)kas-ˈkād \

Definition of cascade 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series

2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade

b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies

3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade

2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

cataract, fall(s), waterfall

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun

Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Verb

The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In the long run, the cascade of consequences places individuals who have experienced early trauma at risk for academic or occupational failure, substance abuse, and health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. Dylan Gee, Vox, "I study kids who were separated from their parents. The trauma could change their brains forever.," 20 June 2018 Evans reports the cascade into Kapoho Bay is releasing toxic steam mixed with tiny particles of glass. CBS News, "Hawaii volcano lava destroys more homes, including Big Island mayor's," 5 June 2018 The premium retailer has moved the cascade of cosmetic counters that greet customers who walk into its Manhattan flagship to the second floor. Charisse Jones, USA TODAY, "Saks Fifth Avenue bets 'magic mirrors,' face workouts will bring online buyers to stores," 29 May 2018 The cascade of tweets appearing to all come from young women was a stark reminder that the #MeToo movement set off by allegations against movie producer Harvey Weinstein stretches far beyond Hollywood. Lily Altavena, azcentral, "Mesa man who lured teens on Instagram charged in second underage sex abuse case," 22 May 2018 For a day hike, take the relatively flat foot path around the reservoir to the picturesque Wapama Falls (5.5 miles out and back), or continue all the way to the soothingly loud cascades of Rancheria Falls (13 miles out and back). Gregory Thomas, San Francisco Chronicle, "Yosemite Valley is under siege from tourists. Can it be saved?," 26 Apr. 2018 The scrolling behavior really likes to lock into an app thumbnail and come to a stop, rather than the free-flowing cascade of normal Android. Ron Amadeo, Ars Technica, "Android Go review—Google’s scattershot attempt at a low-end Android OS," 20 Apr. 2018 Our pick is the 13-day wildlife journey, with orca-watching off Argentina’s Peninsula Valdés, a chance to see the recovering jaguar population in the Iberá wetlands, and a finish at the 275 towering cascades of Iguazú Falls. The Editors, Outside Online, "The 25 Trips You Need to Take This Year," 20 Mar. 2018 On the day, a colourful cascade of fireworks illuminated Astana’s gleaming space-age facades. The Economist, "The president of Kazakhstan throws himself a modest birthday bash," 12 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Separately, the state board expects to release later this year a parallel proposal for allowing more of the Sacramento River watershed to cascade through the Delta and wash out to sea. Dale Kasler, sacbee, "California has a new plan for allocating its water, and it means less for farmers," 6 July 2018 In the northern triangle of Central America, which incorporates Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, the violence per capita has had a cascading effect. Ioan Grillo, The New Republic, "When Democracy Isn’t Enough," 6 June 2018 Because steel and aluminum are such important inputs, their higher costs could lead to cascading protectionism. Washington Post, "Does Trump want a trade war? What you need to know about Smoot-Hawley tariffs and the 1930s.," 21 Mar. 2018 As an inmate serving time for a non-violent crime, Valencia tied back her cascading brown hair and put an apron over her Corrections Department jumpsuit, with the understanding that each kitchen shift would reduce her prison time by a day. Mary Hudetz, The Seattle Times, "Hundreds of New Mexico inmates held past parole date," 23 Jan. 2018 Dicks Creek Falls The impressive Dicks Creek Falls cascades over huge boulders into a deep pool. Eric Champlin, ajc, "40 must-visit waterfalls in North Georgia," 14 June 2018 From that decision cascaded a thousand others, each one subtly reinforcing our roles. Claire Dederer, The Cut, "What I’d Like to Tell My New-Mom Self," 30 May 2018 Even her pant legs came with little trains that cascaded (kind of) on the staircase. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kendall Jenner Channels Kim Kardashian in an All-White Met Gala Look," 8 May 2018 With dark roots cascading into swirls of buttery blonde and ash, this hair color looks about as delicious as everyone’s go-to Starbucks order. Rebecca Norris, Allure, "The Caramel Latte Hair-Color Trend Looks as Delicious as It Sounds," 14 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

Verb

see cascade entry 1

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

5 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cascade

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall; especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls

: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down

: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ka-ˈskād \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \(ˌ)kas-ˈkād \

Medical Definition of cascade 

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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