cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events. Verb The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Spanning the width of the Zambezi River—more than a mile across—this legendary waterfall cascades over the lip of a large plateau of volcanic rock and plunges as much as 354 feet. Amy Mckeever, National Geographic, "Extreme weather threatens one of Earth's most awe-inspiring waterfalls," 18 Feb. 2020 The 2018 shooting at Stoneman Douglas came from a depressing cascade of poor decisions from local actors. Jack Butler, National Review, "Two Years Later, Don’t Misplace Blame for Parkland," 14 Feb. 2020 The interferons trigger cascades of antiviral activity, from shutting down host protein synthesis to inducing cell death. Simon Makin, Scientific American, "How Coronaviruses Cause Infection—from Colds to Deadly Pneumonia," 5 Feb. 2020 What happens: The immune system overreacts to the food by triggering an inflammatory cascade. Lauran Neergaard, Anchorage Daily News, "FDA approves first treatment for kids with peanut allergy," 1 Feb. 2020 Then came the Cambridge Analytica debacle, and with it a cascade of highly public inquiries and privacy revelations that resulted in the cessation of Building 8. Sidney Fussell, The Atlantic, "Facebook Just Wants to Help (Itself)," 8 Jan. 2020 His statistics in that Nov. 3 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers: five touchdown passes, 378 yards, no interceptions and a cascade of elusive scrambles. Kurt Streeter, New York Times, "The Unbearable Lightness of Being Russell Wilson," 4 Jan. 2020 Castro asked, drawing a roar of groans from the audience and a cascade of criticism from Democrats far and wide. Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times, "Julián Castro quits the 2020 presidential race," 2 Jan. 2020 That action sent a cascade of freshwater – filled with nutrient-rich agricultural runoff – flowing southeastward, eventually into the warm Mississippi Sound. al, "New dredging program could be boon for Port of Mobile," 21 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The failure of a results-reporting app, due to what the Iowa Democratic Party called a coding issue and a series of problems cascading from those glitches, showed that foreign meddling isn’t the only risk, experts say. Alexa Corse, WSJ, "Voting Process Under Spotlight After Iowa Confusion," 9 Feb. 2020 To keep up with the Old Hollywood vibe, hairstylist Shelby Swain used Matrix products and GHD Hot Tools to give Lizzo a deep part on the left side and curled her long hair in loose curls, cascading down her back. Audrey Noble, Allure, "All the Details Behind Lizzo's Entire Beauty Look at the 2020 Grammys," 27 Jan. 2020 Another turns the garden waterfalls, turned off for the winter, into lightfalls, with the white bulbs cascading over the rocks. Steve Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "A guide to the biggest holiday lights shows in the Chicago area, including Zoolights and a brand new look for the Chicago Botanic Garden," 20 Nov. 2019 The original Versace number was a crystal mesh gown with ostrich feathers cascading from the hem and piled onto her sleeves. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Stormi Webster Was Kylie Jenner at the Met Gala for Halloween," 28 Oct. 2019 But just as crucial to this novel’s triumph is Evaristo’s proprietary style, a long-breath, free-verse structure that sends her phrases cascading down the page. Ron Charles, Washington Post, "Bernardine Evaristo’s ‘Girl, Woman, Other’ received half a Booker Prize, but it deserves all the glory," 28 Oct. 2019 Yellow features a man ripping his chest open with thousands of yellow Lego bricks cascading from the cavity. Marcy De Luna, Houston Chronicle, "‘The Art of the Brick’ Lego exhibit debuts at Houston Museum of Natural Science," 7 Oct. 2019 The shot featured a pair of lifestyle bloggers, Caitlin Covington and Emily Gemma, sporting wide smiles, large curls cascading past their scarves and skinny jeans. Char Adams, PEOPLE.com, "Beyond 'Hot Girl Summer': Influencers Speak Out After 'Christian Girl Autumn' Takes Over Twitter," 14 Aug. 2019 The rainfall in the days prior to the disaster had led to a build-up of water in the tip, saturating the waste material and causing 3.8 million cubic feet of rubbish to cascade down the hillside and into the village below. Matthew Robinson, CNN, "What was the Aberfan disaster, seen in 'The Crown' episode 3?," 22 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Time Traveler for cascade

Time Traveler

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

26 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cascade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cascade. Accessed 26 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun
How to pronounce cascade (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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