cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a steep usually small fall of water especially : one of a series
2a : something arranged or occurring in a series or in a succession of stages so that each stage derives from or acts upon the product of the preceding blood clotting involves a biochemical cascade
b : a fall of material (such as lace) that hangs in a zigzag line and that is used especially in clothing and draperies
3 : something falling or rushing forth in quantity a cascade of sound a cascade of events Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls.

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in a cascade The water cascaded over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like a cascade
2 : to connect in a cascade arrangement

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Synonyms for cascade

Synonyms: Noun

cataract, fall(s), waterfall

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Examples of cascade in a Sentence

Noun

Her hair was arranged in a cascade of curls. That decision set off a cascade of events.

Verb

The water cascades over the rocks. Her hair cascaded down around her shoulders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

More than twenty years ago, sea lions discovered Willamette Falls, an enormous basalt cascade in the shape of a horseshoe on the Willamette River. Sallie Tisdale, Harper's magazine, "Catechism of the Waters," 10 June 2019 Yesterday for her big day, Depp played up her cascade of dirty blonde waves, curled and teased to retro bombshell effect by hairstylist Bryce Scarlett (who also masterminded Robbie's tribute looks) with a ‘60s-leaning take on graphic eyeliner. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Lily Rose Depp Channels Sharon Tate With ‘60s-Inspired Eyeliner," 28 May 2019 Typically worn in smooth or beachy waves, Lively's hair was a gorgeous cascade of golden curls — a look created by stylist Orlando Pita using his namesake products. Marci Robin, Allure, "Blake Lively Is Pregnant, Sure, But Did You See Her Curly Hair?," 3 May 2019 This stunning loop hike climbs and winds along a ridge line between the craggy peaks of the cascades. Audrey Bruno, SELF, "The 15 Best Places to Go Hiking in the Fall," 28 Oct. 2018 Merkel, however, is determined that Germany shouldn’t take unilateral action without agreement with other EU countries, fearing a cascade of uncoordinated decisions that could further fray European unity. Washington Post, "Germany’s Merkel faces race against time in migrant standoff," 27 June 2018 For an unexpected, subtle look, tie a skinny scarf in a sweet little bow and let the ends cascade down the side of your outfit. 5. Kaitlin Menza, Redbook, "11 Fun, Fresh Ways to Wear a Scarf," 22 Aug. 2017 So [learning of the firm’s work] started a whole cascade of questions. Samantha Weiss Hills, Curbed, "Embracing nature—and minimalism—in North Carolina," 26 Nov. 2018 Trout had faced Cook 12 times previously, but not since 2015, after which Cook suffered a cascade of injuries. Tom Verducci, SI.com, "The Star That Still Won't Shine: The Incredible, Unprecedented but Unseen Greatness of Mike Trout," 12 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

If forced to move beyond Walker, there could be a cascading effect in play as the Lakers look for guard help in lower tiers. Rob Mahoney, SI.com, "After Year of Turmoil, Lakers Look Ready to Contend," 15 June 2019 Since then, California has struggled to deal with a cascading series of problems and almost constant oversight by federal judges. ProPublica, "Cruel and Unusual: A Guide to California’s Broken Prisons and the Fight to Fix Them," 28 May 2019 Those regions were especially at risk of life being damaged or dying off and having cascading effects on neighboring ecosystems. Sarah Gibbens, National Geographic, "Ocean heat waves are killing underwater life, threatening biodiversity," 4 Mar. 2019 The move is expected to cascade through the economy, in particular nudging up rates for variable-rate consumer loans such as credit cards and adjustable-rate mortgages. Paul Davidson, USA TODAY, "Fed decision: Federal Reserve hikes rates to range of 1.75% to 2%, ups forecast to 4 hikes in '18," 13 June 2018 The singer/Met Gala co-host/Queen of Camp showed up to this year's Met Gala in a massive hot pink Brandon Maxwell gown, complete with a cascading train and a giant matching bow on her head. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "Lady Gaga Just Had 4 Outfit Changes on the Met Gala Red Carpet and We’re Deceased," 6 May 2019 My guess is that there was a cascading event — a pole that fell, and that pole pulled down the other poles. Lewis Kamb, The Seattle Times, "City Light releases more details on poles that collapsed, but says it still doesn’t know why they toppled," 11 Apr. 2019 The piece itself is an expression of the celebrated Chaine d’Ancre link created by Robert Dumas in 1938, and it can just as easily be worn classically in front or cascading down the back. Vogue, "Hermès’s Chaine d’Ancre Turns 80 This Year, and Pierre Hardy Has Created a High Jewelry Collection to Celebrate It," 3 July 2018 The mid-April floods sent brown mud and water cascading into these fields. The muck is packed with nitrogen, so it’s as though a big kick of fertilizer walloped taro patches. Audrey Mcavoy, BostonGlobe.com, "Shortage of key Hawaii crop expected after rains swamp farms," 28 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cascade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cascade

Noun

1641, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1702, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for cascade

Noun and Verb

French, from Italian cascata, from cascare to fall, from Vulgar Latin *casicare, from Latin casus fall

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Statistics for cascade

Last Updated

18 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for cascade

The first known use of cascade was in 1641

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More Definitions for cascade

cascade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a small, steep waterfall especially : one that is part of a series of waterfalls
: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down
: a large number of things that happen quickly in a series

cascade

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or hang down in large amounts

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ ka-ˈskād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Kids Definition of cascade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a steep usually small waterfall

cascade

verb
cascaded; cascading

Kids Definition of cascade (Entry 2 of 2)

: to flow or fall rapidly and in large quantity Tears cascaded from the baby's eyes.

cascade

noun
cas·​cade | \ (ˌ)kas-ˈkād How to pronounce cascade (audio) \

Medical Definition of cascade

: a molecular, biochemical, or physiological process occurring in a succession of stages each of which is closely related to or depends on the output of the previous stage a cascade of enzymatic reactions the cascade of events comprising the immune response

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Comments on cascade

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