blade

noun
\ˈblād \

Definition of blade 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : leaf sense 1a(1) especially : the leaf of an herb or a grass

b : the flat expanded part of a leaf as distinguished from the petiole

2 : something resembling the blade of a leaf: such as

a : the broad flattened part of an oar or paddle

b : an arm of a screw propeller, electric fan, or steam turbine

c : the broad flat or concave part of a machine (such as a bulldozer or snowplow) that comes into contact with the material to be moved

d : a broad flat body part specifically : scapula used chiefly in naming cuts of meat

e : the flat portion of the tongue immediately behind the tip also : this portion together with the tip

3a : the cutting part of an implement

b(1) : sword

(2) : swordsman

(3) : a dashing lively man

c : the runner of an ice skate

blade

verb
bladed; blading

Definition of blade (Entry 2 of 2)

1 transitive golf : to hit (a ball or shot) with the leading edge of the clubface : skull I hit a wedge from 45 yards and basically bladed it over the green.— Tiger Woods

2 intransitive : to skate on in-line skates Connect a pair of these wild things to your feet and you are blading—cruising with all the cool of ice skating but without the ice.— Bob Batz Jr.

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Other Words from blade

Noun

bladelike \ ˈblād-​ˌlīk \ adjective

Verb

blader \ ˈblā-​dər \ noun

Synonyms for blade

Synonyms: Noun

cutter, knife, shank [slang], shiv [slang]

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Examples of blade in a Sentence

Noun

the blade of an ax dueled with blades rather than guns

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

That business has been plagued by issues like dropping global demand and turbine blade failures, which have contributed to the stock’s swoon in recent months. Saumya Vaishampayan, WSJ, "GE Shares Fall Again, Hit New Low," 12 Nov. 2018 Always make sure to cut away from your hands and on a steady surface, and never stick your hand into a machine or a device with blades while it's plugged in. Audrey Bruno, SELF, "What to Do When You Inevitably Cut Yourself in the Kitchen," 10 Nov. 2018 It can be used with straight-edge or serrated blades. Francine Maroukian, Popular Mechanics, "How To Buy Kitchen Knives Like a Pro," 24 Oct. 2018 Here it’s used in a NASA simulation of the flow around an oscillating rotor blade. Lee Phillips, Ars Technica, "Turbulence, the oldest unsolved problem in physics," 10 Oct. 2018 While soft-drink sales decline, Sodastream — which uses the razors-and-blades model — has projected 23% revenue growth this year. Recode Staff, Recode, "Recode Daily: Have we broken Elon Musk?," 20 Aug. 2018 The containers can reportedly separate from the base, causing blades to be exposed. Lindsey Murray, Good Housekeeping, "Why 100K Vitamix Blending Containers Have Been Recalled," 13 Aug. 2018 Safety and straight razors are a different story: All blades must be packed in your checked bag, no matter what. Katherine Lagrave, Condé Nast Traveler, "The TSA Gets Asked About These 5 Items The Most," 8 Aug. 2018 At one point while the singer was onstage, a fan handed her an inflatable sword, complete with an impressive handle and long pointed blade. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Someone Gave Carly Rae Jepsen a Sword at Lollapalooza," 5 Aug. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Burr grinders, as opposed to blade grinders, grind the coffee more evenly and consistently. Rachel Marlowe, Vogue, "How to Make the Perfect Cup, According to California’s Coolest Coffee Brand," 5 July 2017 Sami Vatanen had a clear shot at goalie Cam Talbot but missed up high, and Andrew Cogliano had a chance to blade a puck out of the air at close range. Mark Whicker, Orange County Register, "Whicker: A new face stops the Ducks’ Game 7 jinx," 10 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blade

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1959, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for blade

Noun

Middle English, from Old English blæd; akin to Old High German blat leaf, Latin folium, Greek phyllon, Old English blōwan to blossom — more at blow

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Statistics for blade

Last Updated

18 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for blade

The first known use of blade was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for blade

blade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blade

: the flat sharp part of a weapon or tool that is used for cutting

: one of the flat spinning parts that are used on some machines to push air or water

: the wide flat part of an oar or paddle

blade

noun
\ˈblād \

Kids Definition of blade

1 : a leaf of a plant and especially of a grass

2 : the broad flat part of a leaf

3 : something that widens out like the blade of a leaf the blade of a propeller the blade of an oar

4 : the cutting part of a tool, machine, or weapon a knife blade

5 : sword

6 : the runner of an ice skate

Other Words from blade

bladed \ ˈblā-​dəd \ adjective

blade

noun
\ˈblād \

Medical Definition of blade 

1 : a broad flat body part (as the shoulder blade)

2 : the flat portion of the tongue immediately behind the tip also : this portion together with the tip

3 : a flat working and especially cutting part of an implement (as a scalpel)

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