scapula

noun
scap·​u·​la | \ ˈska-pyə-lə How to pronounce scapula (audio) \
plural scapulae\ ˈska-​pyə-​ˌlē How to pronounce scapula (audio) , -​ˌlī \ or scapulas

Definition of scapula

: either of a pair of large triangular bones lying one in each dorsal lateral part of the thorax, being the principal bone of the corresponding half of the shoulder girdle, and articulating with the corresponding clavicle or coracoid

called also shoulder blade

Examples of scapula in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Mets fans have grown painstakingly accustomed to the Friday news that Jacob deGrom would be out for at least four weeks with a stress reaction to his scapula. Andrew Tredinnick, USA TODAY, 2 Apr. 2022 DeGrom won’t throw for up to four weeks and there is no timetable for his return, the Mets said, after an MRI exam earlier in the day showed a stress reaction on his scapula that caused inflammation. San Francisco Chronicle, 1 Apr. 2022 This is a great routine for training the opposite muscles of your back, scapula and posterior delts. Ben Walker, Outside Online, 28 Aug. 2020 One of Suntok’s fossil finds, a partial scapula with fine fractures, posed a unique challenge, says Rohlicek. Devon Bidal, Smithsonian Magazine, 18 Feb. 2022 The trapezius muscle stabilizes, elevates, depresses, retracts and rotates the scapula (shoulder blade). Amy Marturana Winderl, SELF, 26 Jan. 2022 Using your scapula as your lever, keep your arms straight and slowly resist the pull of the band back together. Ben Walker, Outside Online, 28 Aug. 2020 The rhomboids play a role in stabilizing and retracting the scapula. Amy Marturana Winderl, SELF, 26 Jan. 2022 Why This exercise focuses on strengthening the muscles around the shoulder blade or the scapula by targeting the lower traps and improving their ability to keep the shoulders down and back. Ben Walker, Outside Online, 28 Aug. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scapula.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of scapula

1578, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for scapula

New Latin, from Latin, shoulder blade, shoulder

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Time Traveler for scapula

Time Traveler

The first known use of scapula was in 1578

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Dictionary Entries Near scapula

scapul-

scapula

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Statistics for scapula

Last Updated

15 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Scapula.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scapula. Accessed 16 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for scapula

scapula

noun
scap·​u·​la | \ ˈskap-yə-lə How to pronounce scapula (audio) \
plural scapulae\ -​ˌlē How to pronounce scapula (audio) , -​ˌlī How to pronounce scapula (audio) \ or scapulas

Medical Definition of scapula

: either of a pair of large essentially flat and triangular bones lying one in each dorsolateral part of the thorax, being the principal bone of the corresponding half of the shoulder girdle, divided on the posterior surface into the supraspinous and infraspinous fossae by an oblique transverse bony process or spine terminating in the acromion, having a hook-shaped bony coracoid process on the anterior surface of the superior border of the bone, providing articulation for the humerus, and articulating with the corresponding clavicle

called also shoulder blade

More from Merriam-Webster on scapula

Nglish: Translation of scapula for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scapula for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about scapula

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