fade

1 of 3

verb

faded; fading

intransitive verb

1
: to lose freshness, strength, or vitality : wither
fading flowers
2
: to lose freshness or brilliance of color
The fabrics faded in the strong sunshine.
3
: to sink away : vanish
a fading memory
The smile faded from his face.
4
: to change gradually in loudness, strength, or visibility
used of a motion-picture image or of an electronics signal and usually with in or out
One scene fades out as the next scene fades in.The radio signal faded out as we got further away from the station.
5
of an automobile brake : to lose braking power gradually
6
: to move back from the line of scrimmage
used of a quarterback
7
of a ball or shot : to move in a slight to moderate slice

transitive verb

: to cause to fade
time has not completely faded the humor of these versesG. H. Genzmer
fader noun

fade

2 of 3

noun

1
a
b
: a gradual changing of one picture to another in a motion-picture or television sequence
2
: a fading of an automobile brake
3
: a slight to moderate and usually intentional slice in golf
4
: a hairstyle similar to a crew cut in which the hair on top of the head stands high

fade

3 of 3

adjective

Example Sentences

Verb The flowers were fading in the vase. the fading light of late afternoon She was fading fast from the effects of the pneumonia. We watched the ship gradually fade from view as it sailed away. The smile faded from his face. Hopes for a quick end of the crisis are fading fast. Their reasons for leaving have faded from memory. He's trying to recapture the faded glory of his youth. The band's popularity has faded in recent years. The fabric will fade unless you protect it from the sunlight. Noun The movie ends with a fade to black. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
When the novelty of that life starts to fade, the harsh reality of it might sting. Carine Bizet, Vogue, 17 Jan. 2023 The Steinmetz Hall crowd was cheering before the final note even had a chance to fade. Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel, 16 Jan. 2023 That immune memory appears to fade over time, however. Brenda Goodman, CNN, 16 Jan. 2023 Last Holiday Queen Latifah plays a quiet woman named Georgia who has always been one to fade into the background. Aimée Lutkin, ELLE, 14 Jan. 2023 When to toss: After one to two days Why toss it: Exposure to oxygen, heat, and daylight will cause wine's aromas and flavors to fade. Jessica Bennett, Better Homes & Gardens, 13 Jan. 2023 The Vikings have been expected to fade all season, largely because of their propensity for winning games through unpredictable factors like turnovers and coming out ahead in the penalty battle. David Hill, New York Times, 12 Jan. 2023 Other symptoms — such as chest pain, cough, muscle aches and hair loss — tended to fade away within a year. Erika Edwards, NBC News, 11 Jan. 2023 So, too, has the criticism of Trump become more robust as his fortunes appear to fade. Diane Brady, Forbes, 20 Dec. 2022
Noun
Do not put dining chairs in direct sunlight, which can cause the wood’s stain, upholstery, or plastic color to fade. Samantha S. Thorpe, Better Homes & Gardens, 3 Nov. 2022 But a combination of Mitch Garver’s early-season forearm injury, lack of productive catching depth and Jonah Heim’s second-half offensive fade kept them just out of the top 10. Dallas News, 30 Sep. 2022 This is a bit of a scary fade to me as both these players project out very well. Nick Hennion, Chicago Tribune, 28 Sep. 2022 Once top notes start to fade, the middle notes will become more apparent. Dallas News, 30 Nov. 2022 His fade is partly a function of his own missteps and miscalculations in recent months. Maggie Haberman, New York Times, 19 Dec. 2022 The deep cultural significance of the skin fade and North Face jacket combo. Los Angeles Times, 17 Dec. 2022 As for the incomplete fade to Peoples-Jones on fourth and 6 late in the game, Van Pelt is confident the those will hit soon. cleveland, 14 Dec. 2022 Service costs excluding energy are now contributing about 3.9 percentage points of overall inflation and are expected to keep price increases rapid even as other types of inflation fade. Arkansas Online, 14 Dec. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French *fader, from fade feeble, insipid, from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, alteration of Latin fatuus fatuous, insipid

Noun

derivative of fade entry 1

Adjective

Middle English, from Anglo-French

First Known Use

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1918, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of fade was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near fade

Cite this Entry

“Fade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fade. Accessed 31 Jan. 2023.

Kids Definition

fade

1 of 2 verb
faded; fading
1
: to lose freshness or health
fading flowers
2
: to lose or cause to lose brightness of color
3
: to disappear gradually
a fading memory
4
: to change gradually in loudness or visibility
used of a motion-picture image or of an electronics signal and usually with in or out

fade

2 of 2 noun
: a gradual changing of one picture to another in a motion-picture or television sequence

More from Merriam-Webster on fade

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