commonplace

noun
com·​mon·​place | \ˈkä-mən-ˌplās \

Definition of commonplace 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 archaic : a striking passage entered in a commonplace book

2a : an obvious or trite comment : truism It is a commonplace that a fool and his money are soon parted.

b : something commonly found A smartphone is a commonplace.

commonplace

adjective

Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: commonly found or seen : ordinary, unremarkable a commonplace occurrence the large mergers that had become commonplace Computers are commonplace in classrooms.

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Other Words from commonplace

Adjective

commonplaceness noun

Examples of commonplace in a Sentence

Noun

It is a commonplace that we only use a small part of our brain's capacity. We now accept cell phones and laptop computers as commonplaces of everyday life.

Adjective

Drug use has become commonplace at rock concerts. He photographed commonplace objects like lamps and bowls.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In surgery and medicine, as in everything else, today’s eccentricity is tomorrow’s commonplace, and some of today’s norms will certainly seem barbaric sooner or later. Laura Kolbe, WSJ, "‘Under the Knife’ Review: The Kindest Cuts," 14 Nov. 2018 As has now become commonplace, people have already dug up an old Trump tweet that perfectly contradicts his latest words and actions. Andrea Park, Glamour, "Trump Bragged About His ‘Accomplishments' and the U.N. General Assembly Cracked Up," 25 Sep. 2018 Plastic surgery is becoming more and more commonplace, and everything from injectables to more traditional procedures (like breast augmentations and face-lifts) are on the table. Rosemary Donahue, Allure, "YouTuber Karissa Pukas Says She Removed Her Breast Implants After Years of Painful Side Effects," 4 Aug. 2018 Facebook and YouTube have both been under pressure to stop the spread of disinformation, which has become commonplace and can lead to serious offline consequences. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Spotify is removing some Alex Jones podcasts because they are ‘hate content’," 1 Aug. 2018 Without the dramatic light shows that became commonplace later into Friday evening, Baker's voice, clear and pure, rang out across the thousands. Erin Richards, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Eaux Claires IV review: Day 1 music," 7 July 2018 Far from seeming extraordinary, men and women in capes, masks and electronic suits have now become avatars of the unimaginative and the commonplace — a development that Bird and his collaborators could hardly have anticipated. Justin Chang, latimes.com, "How the dazzling, overstuffed ‘Incredibles 2’ holds up a cracked mirror to present-day reality," 4 July 2018 Hadley, across this collection, shows off a brilliance for hiding the uncanny in the commonplace; in the title story, a child in the middle of the night upends all the furniture in the living room, with profound consequences for her mother. Joumana Khatib, New York Times, "New in Paperback: ‘Rising Star,’ ‘Mrs. Fletcher’," 8 June 2018 And if not, the occasional trip—combined with a daily routine that’s rich with the commonplace—is just as rewarding. Glenn Ruffenach, WSJ, "Should New Retirees Travel a Lot? We Did.," 1 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Gasoline-electric powertrains are commonplace now, but Toyota has taken steps to make sure its Prius still stands out. Michael Simari, Car and Driver, "2018 Toyota Prius," 17 Jan. 2018 In the real world, public tantrums have become commonplace and even ratified as legitimate expressions of policy grievance. Daniel Henninger, WSJ, "Serena Williams’s Time Out," 12 Sep. 2018 Beers with some sort of fruity component have become pretty commonplace in the lighter beer world, and exhibit A is the radler genre. Markus Haas, San Antonio Express-News, "Your guide to 8 great summer beers," 12 July 2018 Beheadings were commonplace, hearts pulled out of carcasses, screaming men nailed to tables, brawls so primal that adversaries bit chunks of flesh out of one another. Lorraine Ali, latimes.com, "After that wild 'Westworld' finale, the robots aren't the only ones disoriented," 26 June 2018 Paul Goodnight was an artist in the South End long before the neighborhood was fashionable — before million-dollar condos became commonplace, before chic restaurants became the norm. Adrian Walker, BostonGlobe.com, "Ousting of South End artists sounds a sour note," 20 May 2018 When coupled, Cancers must remember that misunderstanding and miscommunications are commonplace, and a simple disagreement does not make your lover your enemy. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "What Your Zodiac Sign Says About Your Worst Relationship Habit," 14 May 2018 For people of color, these experiences are commonplace and familiar, ranging from being followed or obtrusively asked to justify one’s presence in a space, to having institutional power (police, media, law) levied against us. Richard J. Reddick, Fortune, "Existing While Black: Irrational Fear Is the New Breed of Racism," 11 May 2018 Background conversations with reporters in Washington are commonplace, and McCabe had the authority, as the FBI's deputy director, to authorize them. The Washington Post, AL.com, "DOJ refers findings on Andrew McCabe to US Attorney," 19 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commonplace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of commonplace

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1609, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for commonplace

Noun

translation of Latin locus communis widely applicable argument, translation of Greek koinos topos

Adjective

see commonplace entry 1

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Last Updated

15 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for commonplace

The first known use of commonplace was in 1561

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More Definitions for commonplace

commonplace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new or interesting

: something that happens or appears in many places and is not unusual

commonplace

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: happening or appearing in many places and not unusual : very common or ordinary

commonplace

adjective
com·​mon·​place | \ˈkä-mən-ˌplās \

Kids Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: often seen or met with : ordinary He draws commonplace objects, like fences.

commonplace

noun

Kids Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is often seen or met with Crowds are a commonplace of city life.

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