commonplace

adjective

Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: commonly found or seen : ordinary, unremarkable a commonplace occurrence the large mergers that had become commonplace Computers are commonplace in classrooms.

commonplace

noun
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : an obvious or trite comment : truism It is a commonplace that a fool and his money are soon parted.
b : something commonly found A smartphone is a commonplace.
2 archaic : a striking passage entered in a commonplace book

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Other Words from commonplace

Adjective

commonplaceness noun

Examples of commonplace in a Sentence

Adjective Drug use has become commonplace at rock concerts. He photographed commonplace objects like lamps and bowls. Noun It is a commonplace that we only use a small part of our brain's capacity. We now accept cell phones and laptop computers as commonplaces of everyday life.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective White is one of several women who, in the late 1940s and early 1950s, defined television standards that, for better or worse, became commonplace. Michael Magras, Star Tribune, "Review: 'When Women Invented Television,' by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong," 26 Mar. 2021 But early guidance against wearing masks (in part fearing a shortage for healthcare workers) evolved and face coverings became commonplace. Meredith Deliso, ABC News, "How life has changed 1 year into the COVID-19 pandemic: Masks, restrictions largely endure," 7 Mar. 2021 While working from home became more commonplace, Pew Research Center found that 60% of jobs can’t be performed remotely and those were the first ones to be cut when the economic downturn started. Jean Marbella, baltimoresun.com, "‘It’s put the future on hold’ — A year of shutdown has changed how we work, play and navigate a pandemic-altered world," 4 Mar. 2021 Calls for ending the use of IQ tests became commonplace. Jason L. Riley, WSJ, "An Intelligent Discussion About Race and IQ Is Possible," 15 Dec. 2020 As medical advances and breakthroughs became more commonplace, Jonsen said the need for bioethics and the obligation to consult frankly and forthrightly with patients increased. Steve Rubenstein, SFChronicle.com, "Albert Jonsen, a founding scholar of bioethics and S.F. native, dies at 89," 29 Oct. 2020 When emission controls became commonplace in the late 1960s, some cars had dozens of vacuum lines and connections—each one a source for a potential vacuum leak. Mike Allen, Popular Mechanics, "How to Find a Vacuum Leak," 2 Oct. 2020 Nonetheless, the practice is commonplace and has kept thousands of New Yorkers like Padilla trapped in a cycle of poverty. Caroline Spivack, Curbed, "Everything We Know About the Sweeping New Housing Discrimination Lawsuit," 17 Mar. 2021 Today, theoretical research and modeling chemical reactions to understand experimental results is commonplace, as the theoretical discipline became more sophisticated and bench chemists gradually began to incorporate these models into their work. Jeannette Garcia, Scientific American, "How Quantum Computing Could Remake Chemistry," 15 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Sweat suits, joggers, leggings, and T-shirts have all become commonplace to see on your video work calls. Chris Hachey, BGR, "Best Beard Grooming Kit," 24 Mar. 2021 Human papillomavirus, also known as HPV, is the most commonplace, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Megan Marples, CNN, "What is HPV? What you should know about vaccines, symptoms and cancer risks," 4 Mar. 2021 This combination is typical of Casey’s style, in which the commonplace flows into a glistening divine. Washington Post, "In the galleries: A focus on the intersection of art and movement," 26 Feb. 2021 In Ferlinghetti’s world, what comes through is an abiding affection for the commonplace. Los Angeles Times, "Lawrence Ferlinghetti, poet and titan of the Beat era, dies at 101," 23 Feb. 2021 Outside of frigid climes, ice is always a miracle, even if the ingenious invention of vapor-compression refrigeration has made the miracle commonplace. Helen Rosner, The New Yorker, "Pellet Ice Is the Good Ice," 27 Jan. 2021 The sight of people flaunting assault rifles is becoming commonplace at political rallies of Trump supporters and right-wing causes. John Marty, Star Tribune, "It's time to restore the gun ban at the Capitol," 17 Mar. 2021 For many parents, even progressive ones, that sentiment has become commonplace: everyone wants schools to reopen, but the teachers’ unions are dragging their feet. The Economist, "More non-white than white parents prefer remote learning for their children," 14 Mar. 2021 The violent riots have become commonplace in the city and occurred on 100 consecutive nights at one point last year. Andrew Mark Miller, Washington Examiner, "Portland mayor asks for additional police funding to address rising crime months after slashing budget," 13 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commonplace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of commonplace

Adjective

1609, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for commonplace

Noun and Adjective

translation of Latin locus communis widely applicable argument, translation of Greek koinos topos

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Time Traveler for commonplace

Time Traveler

The first known use of commonplace was in 1561

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Statistics for commonplace

Last Updated

4 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Commonplace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/commonplace. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for commonplace

commonplace

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or appearing in many places and not unusual : very common or ordinary

commonplace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

formal
: an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new or interesting
: something that happens or appears in many places and is not unusual

commonplace

adjective
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Kids Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: often seen or met with : ordinary He draws commonplace objects, like fences.

commonplace

noun

Kids Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is often seen or met with Crowds are a commonplace of city life.

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Comments on commonplace

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